Harold Arlen


Composer

About

Also Known As
H. Arlen, Harold Arluck, Hyman Arluck
Birth Place
Buffalo, New York, USA
Born
February 15, 1905
Died
April 23, 1986
Cause of Death
Cancer

Biography

A giant of American song, Harold Arlen wrote the music to some of the most enduring musical numbers of the 20th century, including the songs from "The Wizard of Oz," most famously its signature song, "Over the Rainbow," as well as such classic standards as "Get Happy," "Stormy Weather," "It's Only a Paper Moon," "Blues in the Night," "That Old Black Magic" and hundreds more. An accomplis...

Family & Companions

Frances Williams
Companion
Actor. Dated briefly in early 1930s.
Anya Taranda
Wife
Showgirl, model. Was an early model for the Breck (shampoo) Girl; married January 8, 1937 in Harrison, NY; died of a cerebral tumor on March 9, 1970.

Biography

A giant of American song, Harold Arlen wrote the music to some of the most enduring musical numbers of the 20th century, including the songs from "The Wizard of Oz," most famously its signature song, "Over the Rainbow," as well as such classic standards as "Get Happy," "Stormy Weather," "It's Only a Paper Moon," "Blues in the Night," "That Old Black Magic" and hundreds more. An accomplished arranger and jazz musician in his teens, Arlen began writing songs for the Cotton Club during its heyday in the 1930s before graduating to Broadway and Hollywood. He collaborated with some of the greatest lyricists of his day, from Ira Gershwin and Johnny Mercer to E.A. "Yip" Harburg, who penned the words to his memorable "Oz" songs. His work for feature films was no less memorable, though the films they accompanied rarely met the high standards of his music, save perhaps for "A Star is Born" (1952), which featured "The Man That Got Away." Arlen's work declined along with his health in the late 1960s, though his songs remained evergreen thanks to countless cover versions in nearly every genre of music - from jazz and pop to rock and blues. In a career that spanned over half a decade, Harold Arlen brought swing, bounce, blues and joy to the sound of modern-day America.

Born Hyman Arluck on Feb. 15, 1905 in Buffalo, NY, he was one of two twin boys born to cantor Samuel Arluck and his wife, Celia. Arlen's twin brother passed away a day after their birth, and a third son, Julius, was born seven years later in 1911. Arlen began singing at his father's synagogue at an early age, and was introduced to the piano by his mother, who hoped that he would pursue a career as a music teacher. He began piano studies at the age of eight, but found that his interests lay more with modern compositions like jazz than the classical works of the past. At 12, he penned his first original composition, "Indianola," which drew inspiration from ragtime music. Arlen soon began playing piano in various bands and at local movie and vaudeville houses before forming his own act, The Snappy Trio, at the age of just 15. The group proved lucrative, and Arlen decided to drop out of high school to pursue music as a career. His parents objected strongly, so he attended a vocational school to allay their concerns. Meanwhile, The Snappy Trio had expanded to a five-piece called The Southbound Shufflers, which featured his brother Julius on saxophone. They soon became a popular fixture on the summer beach resort circuit.

Arlen began experimenting with songwriting in the summer of 1924. Though the entire material amounted to nothing, he was soon invited to join a larger group, The Yankee Six, which enjoyed a devoted audience among college crowds. The band later expanded into an 11-piece outfit called The Buffalodians, which played larger ballrooms as well as society events While performing at Geyer's, a restaurant in downtown Buffalo, Arlen met and befriended a young dancer from Boston named Ray Bolger, who would accompany the Buffalodians on their first national tour in 1925. The following year, Arlen returned to songwriting, penning a solo piano piece, "Minor Gaff (Blues Fantasy"), which became his first composition to bear his new stage name, Harold Arlen. Though he enjoyed composing, he viewed it as a means of drawing a paycheck, much like arranging, en route to his goal of becoming a popular singer.

However, it was his arrangements that drew the greatest notice, especially among other musicians. Bandleader Arnold Johnson hired him to arrange several songs for a revue, which Arlen accepted on condition that he also sing in the production. The position soon focused almost primarily on arranging, so Arlen left the band to become a solo singing act in vaudeville. His fortunes, however, continued to pull towards songwriting rather than singing; in 1929, his tune "The Album of My Dreams" became a hit for singer Rudy Vallee. That same year, he landed a performing gig in the musical "The Great Day." During rehearsals, he was asked to fill in for the show's ailing piano accompanist. While waiting between numbers, Arlen picked out a new arrangement for one of the show's numbers, which the composers liked enough to suggest that he create a new song out of it. With lyricist Ted Koehler, Arlen transformed the arrangement into one of his earliest hits, "Get Happy." Soon afterward, he abandoned his singing aspirations to pursue songwriting on a fulltime basis.

"Get Happy" was picked up the following year as the first act finale for a show called "The Nine-Fifteen Review." Though a flop, the song became exceptionally popular, drawing attention to the Arlen-Koehler team. They soon became in-demand writers on the New York stage and cabaret scenes. In the former capacity, they wrote such enduring tunes as "Sweet and Hot" and "It's Only a Paper Moon" for a string of forgotten musicals. However, their work for the famed Cotton Club in Harlem enjoyed greater popularity; between 1930 and 1934, Arlen and Koehler penned their signature material - a blend of upbeat rhythm numbers like "Get Happy," as well as jazz tunes, ballads and torch songs - for two shows a year at the Cotton Club. Among the songs penned during this period were such classics as "Between the Devil and the Deep Blue Sea," "I Love a Parade" and "I've Got the World on a String." They also began writing for one of the Cotton Club's biggest stars, Cab Calloway, including "Stormy Weather," which became a sizable hit for Ethel Waters in 1933.

That same year, Arlen and Koehler headed to Hollywood for their first film assignment, "Let's Fall in Love" (1933), which featured their song of the same name. Upon returning to New York, they wrote their final numbers for the Cotton Club, which closed in 1936, before joining forces with George Gershwin and lyricist E.A. "Yip" Harburg for the show "Life Begins at 8:40," which featured Bolger, comic Bert Lahr, and a young actress-model named Anya Taranda, with whom Arlen had fallen hopelessly in love. The project marked the beginning of Arlen's long, fruitful collaboration with Harburg, which would soon come to encompass some of their most famous work.

After marrying Taranda in 1937, Arlen and his new bride moved to Los Angeles, where they befriended many fellow New York composers who had moved west to try their hand at the movie business, including Jerome Kern and Irving Berlin. The Arlens also moved among the Hollywood acting elite, counting such figures as Groucho Marx, Danny Kaye, George Burns and Jack Benny among their immediate friends. In 1938, Arlen himself would become a major Hollywood star when he and Harburg were contracted by producer Arthur Freed to pen the score for "The Wizard of Oz," which featured old friends Ray Bolger and Bert Lahr in the cast. Given only two months to complete all of the music for the film, Arlen quickly knocked out some of the film's more upbeat numbers, including "We're Off to See the Wizard" and "Ding-Dong! The Witch is Dead," but struggled to produce a sweeping ballad which he felt was necessary to the film.

The melody of "Over the Rainbow" came to him while driving down Sunset Boulevard, with the bridge surfacing the following day. However, Yarburg felt that the song was too grand a tune for a young Kansas girl like Dorothy Gale to sing, and that it clashed with the simplicity of the film's other songs. Arlen stood his ground, and after receiving Ira Gershwin's approval, the duo completed what was arguably one of the most memorable musical numbers in Hollywood history. To their dismay, the song was struck from the film three times before producer Arthur Freed demanded that the studio retain the song. The following year, "Over the Rainbow" received the Oscar for Best Film Song of the year and it became Judy Garland's signature number for her entire life, as well as continuing to delight generations of children who watched the classic film each year on television, singing along to the timeless tune.

In the years that followed "Oz," Arlen retained his status as one of the motion picture industry's most in-demand composers. That year 1939 also saw the release of the Marx Brothers classic "At the Circus," which featured one of Groucho's signature tunes, "Lydia the Tattooed Lady." Two years later, he teamed with Johnny Mercer to compose a blues number for a feature called "Hot Nocturne." The end result was "Blues in the Night," one of Arlen's most enduring songs, which also became the title of the picture it accompanied. Between 1942 and 1946, the Arlen-Mercer team wrote such high-water marks of the American songbook as "That Old Black Magic," "One for My Baby (And One More for the Road)," and "Ac-Cent-Tchu-Ate the Positive," all tremendous hits during their heyday. Ironically, each was better remembered than the films in which they were featured, including "Here Comes the Waves" (1944), a Betty Hutton programmer that gave rise to "Ac-Cent-Tchu-Ate." Similarly, songs like "Anyplace I Hang My Hat" and I Wonder What Became of Me?" were the centerpiece of an otherwise forgettable 1946 musical called "St. Louis Woman."

In 1952, Arlen reunited with Ira Gershwin for a screen musical based on "A Star is Born" (1937). Leading the film's cast was Judy Garland, who had blossomed into a movie icon thanks to "Over the Rainbow," and the duo wrote a number for the film that was tailor-made for her larger-than-life talents: "The Man That Got Away," which was singled out by many critics as the highlight of the film. "A Star is Born" would also mark the end of Arlen's tenure in Hollywood. His string of mediocre film projects, as well as the passing of his father in 1953, spurred him to return to New York. There, he continued to write for Hollywood, including the score for "The Country Girl" (1953), with Bing Crosby and Grace Kelly. Arlen also collaborated with Truman Capote on "House of Flowers," based on one of the author's short stories. While working on the score long-distance with Capote, who was based in Paris, Arlen was hospitalized with an ulcer that bled so gravely that it required three transfusions. He recovered to complete "House of Flowers," which opened to mixed reviews in 1954.

In 1956, Arlen re-teamed with Harburg for "Jamaica," a musical romance set in the tropics. He convinced Lena Horne, an old friend from the Cotton Club days, to star in the show, which became his first bona fide Broadway success in years, running some 500 performances. The Arlens then returned to California, which began a lengthy fallow period for the composer. He spent much of the time mourning the loss of his mother, who died that same year, and his own health had begun a marked decline. But the grief was tempered by the arrival of a son, Samuel, who was born in 1958. Arlen recovered sufficiently to begin work on a new musical with Mercer called "Saratoga." The project, based on Edna Ferber's novel Saratoga Trunk, featured Broadway leading man Howard Keel, who received good notices for his work, but the show itself was capsized by a ponderous script and sluggish direction.

"Saratoga" would be Arlen's final stage effort (1959), though he would continue to write songs for the next decade. Among his works during this period were the score for "Gay Purr-ee" (1962), an animated musical featuring the voice of Judy Garland, and "Happy with the Blues," a collaboration with singer Peggy Lee. But his final years were also marked by deep sadness. His wife, Anya, suffered a brain tumor that robbed her of her speech and motor control. Her death on March 9, 1970 sent Arlen into a depression that caused him to withdraw from family and friends. He remained largely homebound, struggling with Parkinson's disease, until his death in New York City on April 23, 1986. Less than two decades later, "Over the Rainbow" was recognized as the top song of the 20th century by the Recording Industry Association of America and the National Endowment of the Arts. The American Film Institute further honored the song by naming it the greatest movie song of all time in 2004.

By Paul Gaita

Filmography

 

Music (Feature Film)

The Aftermath (2019)
Song
The Goldfinch (2019)
Song
A Star is Born (2018)
Song
Green Book (2018)
Song
Wonder (2017)
Song
Blade Runner 2049 (2017)
Song
Ghostbusters (2016)
Song
Dirty Grandpa (2016)
Song
The Wedding Ringer (2015)
Song
Born to Be Blue (2015)
Song
RoboCop (2014)
Song
Blended (2014)
Song
Fort McCoy (2014)
Song
Killing Them Softly (2012)
Song
Ghost Rider: Spirit of Vengeance (2012)
Song
Glee The 3D Concert Movie (2011)
Song
Did You Hear About the Morgans? (2009)
Song
9 (2009)
Song
A Single Man (2009)
Song
Kit Kittredge: An American Girl (2008)
Song
Australia (2008)
Song
Milk (2008)
Song
Fred Claus (2007)
Song
Spider-Man 3 (2007)
Song
P.S. I Love You (2007)
Song
Evening (2007)
Song
The Water Horse (2007)
Song
The Notorious Bettie Page (2006)
Song
Idlewild (2006)
Song
The Break-Up (2006)
Song
Alpha Dog (2006)
Song
The Wedding Weekend (2006)
Song
Invincible (2006)
Song
Good Night, and Good Luck (2005)
Composer
Bewitched (2005)
Song
The Last Shot (2004)
Song
50 First Dates (2004)
Song
Mona Lisa Smile (2003)
Song
How To Lose a Guy in 10 Days (2003)
Song
Down With Love (2003)
Song
Catch Me If You Can (2002)
Song
Pearl Harbor (2001)
Song
What Women Want (2000)
Song
Autumn in New York (2000)
Song
Finding Forrester (2000)
Song
Little Nicky (2000)
Song
Blast from the Past (1999)
Songs ("Ac-Cent-Tchu-Ate The Positive" "That Old Black Magic")
The Story of Us (1999)
Song
Analyze This (1999)
Song
The Out of Towners (1999)
Song
Molly (1999)
Song
My Favorite Martian (1999)
Song
The Other Sister (1999)
Song
Bicentennial Man (1999)
Song
Summer of Sam (1999)
Song
One True Thing (1998)
Song
Permanent Midnight (1998)
Song
City of Angels (1998)
Song
Meet Joe Black (1998)
Song
You've Got Mail (1998)
Song
Sphere (1998)
Song
A Night at the Roxbury (1998)
Song
Selena (1997)
Song
Rocketman (1997)
Song
Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil (1997)
Song
Lolita (1997)
Song ("Stormy Weather")
L.A. Confidential (1997)
Songs ("Ac-Cent-Tchu-Ate The Positive" "Hit The Road To Dreamland")
One Fine Day (1996)
Song
The English Patient (1996)
Words And Music ("It'S Only A Paper Moon")
My Fellow Americans (1996)
Song
Mad Dog Time (1996)
Song
The Wizard of Oz in Concert (1995)
Music
Last Summer in the Hamptons (1995)
Song
Georgia (1995)
Song ("Optimistic Voices")
Radioland Murders (1994)
Song
Dumb & Dumber (1994)
Song
Cops And Robbersons (1994)
Song
That's Entertainment! III (1994)
Music
Jimmy Hollywood (1994)
Song
Mad Dog and Glory (1993)
Song
My Life (1993)
Song
Sleepless In Seattle (1993)
Song
Made In America (1993)
Song
A League of Their Own (1992)
Song
Ruby (1992)
Song
The Mighty Ducks (1992)
Song
Innocent Blood (1992)
Song
School Ties (1992)
Song
Medicine Man (1992)
Song
The Water Engine (1992)
Music
For the Boys (1991)
Song
My Girl (1991)
Song
Grand Canyon (1991)
Song
Bugsy (1991)
Song
The Naked Gun 2 1/2: The Smell of Fear (1991)
Song Performer
The Fisher King (1991)
Song
The Fred Astaire Songbook (1991)
Music
New York Stories (1989)
Song
Sophisticated Lady (1989)
Music
Man Against the Mob: The Chinatown Murders (1989)
Theme Song
Hider in the House (1989)
Song
Ray's Male Heterosexual Dance Hall (1989)
Music
The Presidio (1988)
Song
Torch Song Trilogy (1988)
Song ("This Time The Dream'S On Me")
Shoot To Kill (1988)
Song
Working Girl (1988)
Song
Ishtar (1987)
Music
Heaven (1987)
Song ("Over The Rainbow")
Haunted Honeymoon (1986)
Song
Round Midnight (1986)
Song
Vamp (1986)
Song
Target (1985)
Song
Before Stonewall (1985)
Song
Crimes of Passion (1984)
Song ("Get Happy")
The Cotton Club (1984)
Song
Star Trek III: The Search for Spock (1984)
Song
City Heat (1984)
Song
Terms Of Endearment (1983)
Music
The King Of Comedy (1983)
Song
Jazz in Exile (1982)
Song
Joe Albany... A Jazz Life (1980)
Song
The Brink's Job (1978)
Song
Dr. Phibes Rises Again (1972)
Composer
The Abominable Dr. Phibes (1971)
Composer
Alex in Wonderland (1970)
Composer
Downhill Racer (1969)
Composer
The Swinger (1966)
Composer
Seconds (1966)
Composer
Sylvia (1965)
Composer
I Could Go On Singing (1963)
Composer
Gay Purr-ee (1962)
Composer
All the Fine Young Cannibals (1960)
Composer
Senior Prom (1959)
Composer
Juke Box Rhythm (1959)
Composer
Jazz Ball (1958)
Composer
The Unholy Wife (1957)
Composer
That Certain Feeling (1956)
Composer
Bus Stop (1956)
Composer
Cha-Cha-Cha Boom! (1956)
Composer
Interrupted Melody (1955)
Composer
I'll Cry Tomorrow (1955)
Composer
5 Against the House (1955)
Composer
The Country Girl (1955)
Composer
Young at Heart (1954)
Composer
Dangerous Mission (1954)
Composer
A Star Is Born (1954)
Composer
The Glenn Miller Story (1954)
Composer
Down Among the Sheltering Palms (1953)
Music
The Farmer Takes a Wife (1953)
Composer
Down Among the Sheltering Palms (1953)
Composer
The Marrying Kind (1952)
Composer
Macao (1952)
Composer
With a Song in My Heart (1952)
Composer
My Man and I (1952)
Composer
Meet Danny Wilson (1952)
Composer
Mr. Imperium (1951)
Composer
Dark City (1950)
Composer
When You're Smiling (1950)
Composer
All About Eve (1950)
Composer
Young Man with a Horn (1950)
Composer
The Petty Girl (1950)
Composer
I'll Get By (1950)
Composer
Summer Stock (1950)
Composer
My Blue Heaven (1950)
Composer
Down Memory Lane (1949)
Composer
Slightly French (1949)
Composer
Casbah (1948)
Composer
Road House (1948)
Composer
Wake Up and Dream (1946)
Composer
Swing Parade of 1946 (1946)
Composer
Earl Carroll Sketchbook (1946)
Composer
Junior Miss (1945)
Composer
Out of This World (1945)
Composer
Radio Stars on Parade (1945)
Composer
Too Young to Know (1945)
Composer
Here Come the Waves (1944)
Composer
Ever Since Venus (1944)
Composer
Kismet (1944)
Composer
Up in Arms (1944)
Composer
Meet the People (1944)
Composer
Riding High (1943)
Composer
Stormy Weather (1943)
Composer
The Sky's the Limit (1943)
Composer
They Got Me Covered (1943)
Composer
Star Spangled Rhythm (1943)
Composer
Cabin in the Sky (1943)
Composer
Thank Your Lucky Stars (1943)
Composer
Rio Rita (1942)
Composer
Cairo (1942)
Composer
Captains of the Clouds (1942)
Composer
I Wake Up Screaming (1941)
Composer
Blues in the Night (1941)
Composer
The Wizard of Oz (1939)
Composer
At the Circus (1939)
Composer
Love Affair (1939)
Composer
Babes in Arms (1939)
Composer
Artists and Models (1937)
Composer
The Devil's Saddle Legion (1937)
Composer
Merry-Go-Round of 1938 (1937)
Composer
Stage Struck (1936)
Composer
The Singing Kid (1936)
Composer
Strike Me Pink (1936)
Composer
Gold Diggers of 1937 (1936)
Composer
Mr. Broadway (1933)
Composer
Let's Fall in Love (1933)
Composer
Take a Chance (1933)
Composer
Manhattan Parade (1931)
Composer

Music (Special)

Taxicab Confessions: New York, New York (2003)
Song
Taxicab Confessions 2003: Girls Like It Hot (2003)
Song ("Over The Rainbow")
Hot! Hot! Hot! The Best of Taxicab Confessions 3 (2001)
Song
Taxicab Confessions 2001: All's Fare in Love & Vegas (2001)
Song
Goodnight Moon and Other Sleepytime Tales (1999)
Song ("Hit The Road To Dreamland")
Great Performers at Lincoln Center: A Celebration of the American Musical (1997)
Music
Ira Gershwin at 100: A Celebration at Carnegie Hall (1997)
Music
Singing Positive (1995)
Song
Michael Feinstein & Friends (1991)
Song
An Evening With Maria Ewing (1990)
Song
Julie Andrews in Concert (1990)
Song
The Wonderful Wizard Of Oz: 50 Years Of Magic (1990)
Music
Bloomer Girl (1956)
Songs

Cast (Short)

Cavalcade of the Academy Awards (1940)
Himself

Music (TV Mini-Series)

Unconditional Love (2002)
Song

Life Events

1934

First work in a feature, supplying songs for "Let's Fall in Love"

1939

Received an Oscar for his work on "The Wizard of Oz"

1939

Provided music and songs for the feature, "At the Circus"

1974

Final original work, composed the songs for the ABC series "Paper Moon"

Videos

Movie Clip

Thank Your Lucky Stars (1943) - Blues In The Night, John Garfield Dinah Shore has just opened with the the title song, as radio host Don Wilson helps her segue to top-billed Eddie Cantor and the first big cameo, John Garfield (who co-founded the armed services pro-bono entertainment club the Hollywood Canteen, to which all the stars donated their salaries), with the Harold Arlen-Johnny Mercer tune, in one of the funniest bits in the bulky Warner Bros. wartime propaganda showcase, Thank Your Lucky Stars, 1943.
Sky's The Limit, The (1943) - One For My Baby Bummed out pilot Fred Astaire introduces the Harold Arlen/Johnny Mercer original that became a Frank Sinatra standard, with lots of real broken glass, which caused some fuss at the time due to wartime shortages, and medics were standing by off camera, in The Sky’s The Limit, 1943.
Cabin In The Sky (1943) - A Thing Called Joe Little Joe (Eddie "Rochester" Anderson) comes back to life, prompting Petunia (Ethel Waters) into her sparkling performance of "Happiness Is A Thing Called Joe" by Harold Arlen and E.Y. Harburg, in MGM's Cabin In The Sky, 1943.
Gold Diggers Of 1937 (1936) - Speaking Of The Weather Dick Powell and Joan Blondell, who married in September of 1936, before this picture was released December 26, with as cute a number as any they did, another Harold Arlen and Yip Harburg original, begun after she, the newly hired secretary, ribs him, the dilettante insurance salesman, for not finding her a job, in Gold Diggers Of 1937, 1936.
Gay Purr-ee (1962) - Mewsette Following the credits, Morey Amsterdam narrates as we meet star Judy Garland voicing heroine Mewsette, Robert Goulet her suitor Jaune-Tom, his song by Harold Arlen and E.Y. Harburg, and Red Buttons the sidekick Robespierre, in Warner Bros. Gay Purr-ee, 1962.
Gay Purr-ee (1962) - Roses Red, Violets Blue Mewsette (voice by Judy Garland) has decided to leave her country home to discover Paris, and her celebrations to a tune by Harold Arlen and E.Y. Harburg are overheard by the maybe dangerous Meowrice (Paul Frees), in the Warner Bros. animated feature Gay Purr-ee, 1962
Blues In The Night (1941) - Hang On To Your Lids! Travel montage to jazz band in a freight car, Priscilla Lane (as "Character"), Elia Kazan (the future famous director) on clarinet, Jack Carson on trumpet, Richard Whorf (also later a prominent director) on guitar, with Harold Arlen and Johnny Mercer's "Hang On To Your Lids," from Blues In The Night, 1941.
Blues In The Night (1941) - The Dream's On Me Priscilla Lane (as "Character") performing the Harold Arlen-Johnny Mercer standard "The Dream's On Me" leading into drama featuring Richard Whorf, Howard Da Silva and Wallace Ford, in Blues In The Night, 1941.
Sky's The Limit, The (1943) - My Shining Hour Fred Astaire is a FlyingTigers hero pilot who’s gone AWOL from a P-R tour, not mentioning that to New York photographer/singer Joan (Leslie) upon whom he’s openly putting the moves, song by Harold Arlen and Johnny Mercer, which she introduced earlier, in The Sky’s The Limit, 1943.
Sky's The Limit, The (1943) - A Lot In Common With You 18-year old Joan Leslie keeps up well with 44-year old Fred Astaire in their first dance number, the tune by Harold Arlen and Johnny Mercer name checking both their recent on-screen musical partners, her character heretofore unaware of his performing skills, in The Sky’s The Limit, 1943.
Star is Born, A (1954) - Man That Got Away Movie star Norman (James Mason) sneaks in to catch Esther (Judy Garland), with Danny (Tom Noonan) and the band, in a casual version of Harold Arlen and Ira Gershwin's The Man That Got Away, in A Star Is Born, 1954.
Wizard Of Oz, The (1939) - If I Only Had A Brain Just begun following the yellow brick road, Dorothy (Judy Garland) meets the Scarecrow (Ray Bolger) who has Harold Arlen and E.Y. Harburg's If I Only Had A Brain all ready, in The Wizard Of Oz, 1939.

Trailer

Wizard of Oz, The (1939) -- (1949 Re-issue Trailer) A Kansas farm girl dreams herself into a magical land where she must fight a wicked witch to escape in The Wizard of Oz (1939), starring Judy Garland.
Young Man with a Horn - (Original Trailer) A young trumpet player (Kirk Douglas) is torn between an honest singer (Doris Day) and a manipulative heiress (Lauren Bacall) in Young Man with a Horn (1950).
Devil's Saddle Legion, The - (Original Trailer) A crooked sheriff tries to pin a rancher's death on the victim's son in The Devil's Saddle Legion (1937) with singing cowboy Dick Foran.
Sky's The Limit, The - (Original Trailer) A pilot on leave (Fred Astaire) falls for a pretty news photographer in the musical The Sky's The Limit (1943).
Gay Purr-Ee - (Original trailer) Gay Purr-Ee (1962), an animated musical in which a French country cat becomes entranced with Parisian city life and featuring the voices of Judy Garland and Robert Goulet.
Gold Diggers Of 1937 - (Original Trailer) Those beautiful, avaricious chorus girls are back in the fourth installment of Warner Brothers' musical series, Gold Diggers Of 1937 (1936).
Country Girl, The - (Re-Issue Trailer) Grace Kelly won as Best Actress for her portrayal of The Country Girl (1954) who fights her love for another man while nursing her alcoholic husband.
Summer Stock - (Original Trailer) A farmer gets sucked into show business when a theatrical troupe invades her farm in Summer Stock (1950) starring Judy Garland & Gene Kelly.
Blues in the Night - (Original Trailer) The members of a traveling jazz band try to keep their leader (Richard Whorf) from drinking himself to death in Blues in the Night (1941).
At The Circus - (Original Trailer) The Marx Brothers team up to keep a circus from going bankrupt while they are At the Circus (1939), co-starring Margaret Dumont.

Family

Samuel Arluck
Father
Cantor. Son of Russian Jews; married Celia Orlin on April 15, 1904.
Celia Arluck
Mother
Daughter of Polish Jews; married Samuel Arluck on April 15, 1904.
Jerry Arlen
Brother
Born November 11, 1912.
Samuel Arlen
Nephew
Adopted by Harold Arlen before his death and made primary heir.

Companions

Frances Williams
Companion
Actor. Dated briefly in early 1930s.
Anya Taranda
Wife
Showgirl, model. Was an early model for the Breck (shampoo) Girl; married January 8, 1937 in Harrison, NY; died of a cerebral tumor on March 9, 1970.

Bibliography