City Heat


1h 37m 1984

Brief Synopsis

A Kansas City police lieutenant who is on the trail of a horde of underworld scumbags with a private detective that keeps getting in his way.

Film Details

Also Known As
Cidade Ardente, Ciudad Ardiente, Ciudad muy caliente
MPAA Rating
Genre
Comedy
Action
Crime
Release Date
1984

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 37m

Synopsis

A Kansas City police lieutenant who is on the trail of a horde of underworld scumbags with a private detective that keeps getting in his way.

Crew

Edward Aiona

Property Master

Dick Alexander

Sound

Harold Arlen

Song

Bub Asman

Sound Effects Editor

Matt Earl Beesley

Assistant Director

Paul Calabria

Animal Trainer

Jacqueline Cambas

Editor

Irene Cara

Song Performer

Irene Cara

Song

Edward C Carfagno

Production Designer

Mike Cassidy

Stunts

Gordon Davidson

Sound Effects Editor

Sandra Davis

Assistant Editor

Vince Deadrick

Stunts

Karin Dew

Animal Trainer

Mort Dixon

Song

Richard Drown

Stunts

Clint Eastwood

Song Performer

Blake Edwards

From Story

Blake Edwards

Screenplay

Bud Ekins

Stunts

Tom Ellingswood

Makeup

Arlene Encell

Wardrobe

Les Fresholtz

Sound

George Gaines

Set Decorator

George Gershwin

Music

Ira Gershwin

Theme Lyrics

Allan Graf

Stunts

Jack N Green

Other

Donald Harris

Music Editor

Bob Henderson

Sound Effects Editor

Chuck Hicks

Stunts

Al Jarreau

Song Performer

Pete Jolly

Song Performer

L Dean Jones

Assistant Director

Marie Kenney

Script Supervisor

Linda Sony Kinney

Other

Charles Darin Knight

Sound

Ted Koehler

Song

Sherman Labby

Production

Barbara Lampson

Hair

Mike Lang

Song Performer

Eloise Laws

Song Performer

Julius Leflore

Stunts

Fritz Manes

Unit Production Manager

Fritz Manes

Producer

Fritz Manes

Stunts

Nick Mclean

Director Of Photography

Alan Robert Murray

Sound Effects Editor

Lennie Niehaus

Music

Lennie Niehaus

Song

Michael O'shea

Camera Operator

Vern Poore

Sound

Cole Porter

Song

Debby Porter

Stunts

Marcia Reed

Photography

James Reynolds

Stunts

Bruce Roberts

Song

Mic Rodgers

Stunts

Billy Rose

Song

Charlie Saldana

Key Grip

Norman Saling

Costume Designer

Sharon Schaffer

Stunts

Robert Sessa

Set Designer

Paula H Shaw

Location Manager

Stephen St John

Other

Tom Stern

Gaffer

Joseph C Stinson

Screenplay

Daniel C Striepeke

Makeup

Joe Unsinn

Special Effects

David Valdes

Assistant Director

Rudy Vallee

Song Performer

Wayne Van Horn

Stunts

Wayne Van Horn

Stunt Coordinator

Harry Warren

Song

Chuck Waters

Stunts

Steve Wax

Music Coordinator

George Wilbur

Stunts

Glenn Wilder

Stunts

Joe Williams

Song Performer

Glenn T Wright

Wardrobe

Film Details

Also Known As
Cidade Ardente, Ciudad Ardiente, Ciudad muy caliente
MPAA Rating
Genre
Comedy
Action
Crime
Release Date
1984

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 37m

Articles

Hamilton Camp (1934-2005)


Hamilton Camp, the diminutive yet effervescent actor and singer-songwriter, who spent nearly his entire life in show business, including several appearances in both television and films, died of a heart attack on October 2 at his Los Angeles home. He was 70.

He was born October 30, 1934, in London, England. After World War II, he moved to Canada and then to Long Beach with his mother and sister, where the siblings performed in USO shows. In 1946, he made his first movie, Bedlam starring Boris Karloff as an extra (as Bobby Camp) and continued in that vein until he played Thorpe, one of Dean Stockwell's classmates in Kim (1950).

After Kim he received some more slightly prominent parts in films: a messenger boy in Titanic (1953); and a mailroom attendant in Executive Suite (1954), but overall, Camp was never a steadily working child actor.

Camp relocated to Chicago in the late '50s and rediscovered his childhood passion - music. He began playing in small clubs around the Chicago area, and he struck oil when he partnered with a New York based folk artist, Bob Gibson in 1961. The pair worked in clubs all over the midwest and they soon became known for their tight vocal harmonies and Gibson's 12-string guitar style. Late in 1961, they recorded an album - Gibson and Camp at the Gate of Horn, the Gate of Horn being the most renowned music venue in Chicago for the burgeoning folk scene. The record may have aged a bit over the years, but it is admired as an important progress in folk music by most scholars, particularly as a missing link between the classic era of Woody Guthrie and the modern singer-songwriter genre populated by Bob Dylan and Joan Baez.

Gibson and Camp would split within two years, and after recording some albums as a solo artist and a brief stint with Chicago's famed Second City improvisational comedy troupe, Camp struck out on his own to work as an actor in Los Angeles. His changed his name to Hamilton from Bob, and despite his lack of vertical presence (he stood only 5-foot-2), his boundless energy and quick wit made him handy to guest star in a string of familiar sitcoms of the late '60s: The Monkees, Bewitched, and Love, American Style. By the '70s there was no stopping him as he appeared on virtually every popular comedy of the day: The Mary Tyler Moore Show, M*A*S*H, Laverne & Shirley, Three's Company, and WKRP in Cincinnati.

Eventually, Camp's film roles improved too, and he did his best film work in the latter stages of his career: Blake Edward's undisciplined but still funny S.O.B. (1981); Paul Bartel's glorious cult comedy Eating Raoul (1982); and Clint Eastwood's jazz biopic on Charlie Parker Bird (1988). Among his recent work was a guest spot last season as a carpenter on Desperate Housewives, and his recent completion of a Las Vegas based comedy Hard Four which is currently in post-production. Camp is survived by six children and thirteen grandchildren.

by Michael T. Toole
Hamilton Camp (1934-2005)

Hamilton Camp (1934-2005)

Hamilton Camp, the diminutive yet effervescent actor and singer-songwriter, who spent nearly his entire life in show business, including several appearances in both television and films, died of a heart attack on October 2 at his Los Angeles home. He was 70. He was born October 30, 1934, in London, England. After World War II, he moved to Canada and then to Long Beach with his mother and sister, where the siblings performed in USO shows. In 1946, he made his first movie, Bedlam starring Boris Karloff as an extra (as Bobby Camp) and continued in that vein until he played Thorpe, one of Dean Stockwell's classmates in Kim (1950). After Kim he received some more slightly prominent parts in films: a messenger boy in Titanic (1953); and a mailroom attendant in Executive Suite (1954), but overall, Camp was never a steadily working child actor. Camp relocated to Chicago in the late '50s and rediscovered his childhood passion - music. He began playing in small clubs around the Chicago area, and he struck oil when he partnered with a New York based folk artist, Bob Gibson in 1961. The pair worked in clubs all over the midwest and they soon became known for their tight vocal harmonies and Gibson's 12-string guitar style. Late in 1961, they recorded an album - Gibson and Camp at the Gate of Horn, the Gate of Horn being the most renowned music venue in Chicago for the burgeoning folk scene. The record may have aged a bit over the years, but it is admired as an important progress in folk music by most scholars, particularly as a missing link between the classic era of Woody Guthrie and the modern singer-songwriter genre populated by Bob Dylan and Joan Baez. Gibson and Camp would split within two years, and after recording some albums as a solo artist and a brief stint with Chicago's famed Second City improvisational comedy troupe, Camp struck out on his own to work as an actor in Los Angeles. His changed his name to Hamilton from Bob, and despite his lack of vertical presence (he stood only 5-foot-2), his boundless energy and quick wit made him handy to guest star in a string of familiar sitcoms of the late '60s: The Monkees, Bewitched, and Love, American Style. By the '70s there was no stopping him as he appeared on virtually every popular comedy of the day: The Mary Tyler Moore Show, M*A*S*H, Laverne & Shirley, Three's Company, and WKRP in Cincinnati. Eventually, Camp's film roles improved too, and he did his best film work in the latter stages of his career: Blake Edward's undisciplined but still funny S.O.B. (1981); Paul Bartel's glorious cult comedy Eating Raoul (1982); and Clint Eastwood's jazz biopic on Charlie Parker Bird (1988). Among his recent work was a guest spot last season as a carpenter on Desperate Housewives, and his recent completion of a Las Vegas based comedy Hard Four which is currently in post-production. Camp is survived by six children and thirteen grandchildren. by Michael T. Toole

Clint and Burt in City Heat


Back in the early '80s, it was a project that you could almost visualize the studio decisionmakers injuring themselves in their mad rush to greenlight: the two preeminent male box-office draws of the last decade teaming for the first time in an action-comedy slated for holiday release. What they wound up with were good-but-not-great returns on an interesting misfire, which Warner Home Video has just bowed on DVD as part of its new Clint Eastwood Collection: Clint's one-and-only pairing with macho contemporary Burt Reynolds in the period crime farce City Heat (1984).

The setting is the streets of Depression-era Kansas City, where the tough plainclothes cop Lt. Speer (Eastwood) keeps a wary eye on the activities of his one-time colleague on the force, a slightly shady private eye named Mike Murphy (Burt Reynolds). While boastful of his success since the career change, Murphy is essentially staying one jump ahead of his creditors. Business seems to be picking up for Murphy's agency when his dapper partner Dehl Swift (Richard Roundtree) shows up flashing a lucrative retainer, but Murphy is uneasy.

It seems that Dehl has made the dangerous choice of playing the city's two leading crime lords against one another and believing he'd come out on top. Having been paid off $25,000 by second-ranked capo Primo Pitt (Rip Torn) to procure the incriminating ledgers of Leon Coll (Tony Lo Bianco), Swift figures Coll will pay double that for their return. Pitt and his thugs treat Swift to an impromptu skydiving lesson once news of his dickering with Coll gets out.

From there, City Heat puts Murphy on the spot as Coll expects him to honor Swift's agreement to turn over the ledgers. Not only does he not know where they're located, but Pitt ups the ante by kidnapping Murphy's wifty society girlfriend Caroline (Madeline Kahn) to ransom for the goods. He comes to realize that his only way of getting himself and Caroline out in one piece is to join forces with Speer to recover the evidence and take down the hoods.

The set of City Heat was famously unhappy, as Eastwood clashed with originally-slated writer/director Blake Edwards; Edwards left the project, and his story and co-screenplay credit went to the pseudonymous "Sam O. Brown." Richard Benjamin was brought in to shepherd the film to completion, and while he might have done so without further incident, the finished product is a very standard crime story with flat attempts at humor. Much of the hard-bitten dialogue lands on the ear with a clank, and the moments where the two stars patently burlesque their own tough-guy images draw the occasional smile, but not much more.

The supporting cast is game, with Jane Alexander making the most of it as Murphy's long-suffering secretary and Speer's love interest, a thankless task on a number of levels. Note has to be given to the production design of Edward Carfagno and the costuming of Norman Salling, whose evocation of period look was a shade on the too-clean side, but effective nonetheless. After its December 1984 release, City Heat pulled in domestic grosses of $38 million, not bad for the time but not the huge hit Warner had counted on. While Eastwood would rebound nicely from the experience, City Heat is today representative of the phase in Reynolds' career where his superstardom began to leak oil.

Warner's packaging job on City Heat is on a par with their other recent Eastwood releases, as it boasts a new digital transfer presented in the original theatrical aspect ratio of 1.85:1. The print is as crisp and clean as expected, and the soundtrack has been remastered in Dolby Digital 5.1. The DVD also features multiple spoken foreign-language tracks, including French, Spanish and Portuguese. The special features menu is less than flush, offering only the original theatrical trailer and a filmography of selected Eastwood career highlights.

For more information about City Heat, visit Warner Video. To order City Heat, go to TCM Shopping.

by Jay S. Steinberg

Clint and Burt in City Heat

Back in the early '80s, it was a project that you could almost visualize the studio decisionmakers injuring themselves in their mad rush to greenlight: the two preeminent male box-office draws of the last decade teaming for the first time in an action-comedy slated for holiday release. What they wound up with were good-but-not-great returns on an interesting misfire, which Warner Home Video has just bowed on DVD as part of its new Clint Eastwood Collection: Clint's one-and-only pairing with macho contemporary Burt Reynolds in the period crime farce City Heat (1984). The setting is the streets of Depression-era Kansas City, where the tough plainclothes cop Lt. Speer (Eastwood) keeps a wary eye on the activities of his one-time colleague on the force, a slightly shady private eye named Mike Murphy (Burt Reynolds). While boastful of his success since the career change, Murphy is essentially staying one jump ahead of his creditors. Business seems to be picking up for Murphy's agency when his dapper partner Dehl Swift (Richard Roundtree) shows up flashing a lucrative retainer, but Murphy is uneasy. It seems that Dehl has made the dangerous choice of playing the city's two leading crime lords against one another and believing he'd come out on top. Having been paid off $25,000 by second-ranked capo Primo Pitt (Rip Torn) to procure the incriminating ledgers of Leon Coll (Tony Lo Bianco), Swift figures Coll will pay double that for their return. Pitt and his thugs treat Swift to an impromptu skydiving lesson once news of his dickering with Coll gets out. From there, City Heat puts Murphy on the spot as Coll expects him to honor Swift's agreement to turn over the ledgers. Not only does he not know where they're located, but Pitt ups the ante by kidnapping Murphy's wifty society girlfriend Caroline (Madeline Kahn) to ransom for the goods. He comes to realize that his only way of getting himself and Caroline out in one piece is to join forces with Speer to recover the evidence and take down the hoods. The set of City Heat was famously unhappy, as Eastwood clashed with originally-slated writer/director Blake Edwards; Edwards left the project, and his story and co-screenplay credit went to the pseudonymous "Sam O. Brown." Richard Benjamin was brought in to shepherd the film to completion, and while he might have done so without further incident, the finished product is a very standard crime story with flat attempts at humor. Much of the hard-bitten dialogue lands on the ear with a clank, and the moments where the two stars patently burlesque their own tough-guy images draw the occasional smile, but not much more. The supporting cast is game, with Jane Alexander making the most of it as Murphy's long-suffering secretary and Speer's love interest, a thankless task on a number of levels. Note has to be given to the production design of Edward Carfagno and the costuming of Norman Salling, whose evocation of period look was a shade on the too-clean side, but effective nonetheless. After its December 1984 release, City Heat pulled in domestic grosses of $38 million, not bad for the time but not the huge hit Warner had counted on. While Eastwood would rebound nicely from the experience, City Heat is today representative of the phase in Reynolds' career where his superstardom began to leak oil. Warner's packaging job on City Heat is on a par with their other recent Eastwood releases, as it boasts a new digital transfer presented in the original theatrical aspect ratio of 1.85:1. The print is as crisp and clean as expected, and the soundtrack has been remastered in Dolby Digital 5.1. The DVD also features multiple spoken foreign-language tracks, including French, Spanish and Portuguese. The special features menu is less than flush, offering only the original theatrical trailer and a filmography of selected Eastwood career highlights. For more information about City Heat, visit Warner Video. To order City Heat, go to TCM Shopping. by Jay S. Steinberg

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States December 1984

Released in United States Winter December 1, 1984

Began shooting April 9, 1984.

Released in United States December 1984

Released in United States Winter December 1, 1984