Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil


2h 15m 1997

Brief Synopsis

A visiting city reporter's assignment suddenly revolves around the murder trial of a local millionaire.

Film Details

Also Known As
Medianoche en el jardín del bien y del mal, Midnatt i ondskans och godhetens trädgård
MPAA Rating
Genre
Drama
Crime
Mystery
Adaptation
Release Date
1997
Distribution Company
Warner Bros. Pictures International (WBI)
Location
Savannah, Georgia, USA; Los Angeles, California, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
2h 15m

Synopsis

The murder of a troublesome young man rocks Savannah, Georgia when the crime is pinned on a top high society figure who also happens to be the man's employer and, it's later learned, his gay lover.

Crew

John Anderson

Set Decorator

Harold Arlen

Song

Bub Asman

Sound Editor

Cate Bangs

Set Designer

David Becton

Animal Wrangler

Tony Bennett

Song Performer

John Berendt

Book As Source Material

David Bernstein

Assistant Director

Rube Bloom

Song

Henry Bumstead

Production Designer

Ralph Burns

Song

Neil Burrow

Foley Editor

Scott Burrow

Foley Editor

Willie Burton

Sound Mixer

Stephen S. Campanelli

Steadicam Operator

David E Campbell

Rerecording

Hoagy Carmichael

Song

Kevin E Carpenter

Rerecording

Rosemary Clooney

Song Performer

Lucy Coldsnow-smith

Dialogue Editor

Paula Cole

Song Performer

Joel Cox

Editor

Samuel C Crutcher

Dialogue Editor

Mike Dobie

Sound Effects Editor

Alison Eastwood

Song Performer

Clint Eastwood

Producer

Juno J. Ellis

Adr Supervisor

Ziggy Elman

Other

Jann Engel

Set Designer

Megan Fogarty

Animal Trainer

Patrick J. Foley

Dialogue Editor

John Frazier

Consultant

Richard Goddard

Set Decorator

Sybil Gray

Costume Designer

Jack N Green

Dp/Cinematographer

Jack N Green

Director Of Photography

Shay Griffin

Casting

Jeffrey J. Haboush

Rerecording

John Lee Hancock

Screenplay

Cate Hardman

Script Supervisor

Donald Harris

Music Editor

Olivia Harris

Casting Associate

Woody Herman

Song

Deborah Hopper

Wardrobe

Denise Horta

Adr Editor

David H Horton

Foley

Craig Hosking

Helicopter Pilot

Phyllis Huffman

Casting

Doug Jackson

Sound Effects Editor

Scott D Jackson

Foley Editor

Stephen Janisz

Adr Editor

Gordon Jenkins

Song

Adam Johnston

Sound Effects Editor

Constance A Kazmer

Dialogue Editor

Peter J Kelly

Set Designer

Andy Kopetzky

Foley Editor

Joseph Kosma

Song

Alison Krauss

Song

Gary Krivacek

Sound Effects Editor

Eryn Krueger

Makeup Artist

K.d. Lang

Song Performer

Antoinette Levine

Location Manager

Robert Lorenz

Assistant Director

Kevin Mahogany

Song Performer

Henry Mancini

Song

Michael Maurer

Production Manager

Michael Maurer

Associate Producer

Vivian Mcateer

Hair Stylist

Tania Mccomas

Makeup Artist

Jason Mcgatlin

Production Coordinator

Brad Mehldau

Song Performer

April Melcher

Animal Trainer

Johnny Mercer

Song

James J Murakami

Art Director

Alan Robert Murray

Sound Editor

Lennie Niehaus

Music

Carol A. O'connell

Hair

Joseph G. Pacelli

Set Designer

Joe Pancake

Special Effects Coordinator

Jayme S Parker

Sound Effects Editor

Jacques Prevert

Song

David Raksin

Song

Joshua Redman

Song Performer

John F Reynolds

Dialogue Editor

Bruce Richardson

Dialogue Editor

Steven Riley

Special Effects Coordinator

Tom Rooker

Assistant Director

Tom Rooker

Coproducer

Dodi Lee Rubenstein

Assistant Director

Victor Schertzinger

Song

Karen Spangenberg

Dialogue Editor

Arnold Stiefel

Producer

Jack G Taylor

Art Director

Rose Unite

Assistant Director

Paul Varrieur

Camera Operator

Sadie Vimmerstedt

Song

Harry Warren

Song

Richard A. Whiting

Song

Jay Wilkinson

Sound Effects Editor

Joe Williams

Song Performer

Butch Wolf

Foley Editor

Doris Wood

Choreographer

Anita Zuckerman

Executive Producer

Film Details

Also Known As
Medianoche en el jardín del bien y del mal, Midnatt i ondskans och godhetens trädgård
MPAA Rating
Genre
Drama
Crime
Mystery
Adaptation
Release Date
1997
Distribution Company
Warner Bros. Pictures International (WBI)
Location
Savannah, Georgia, USA; Los Angeles, California, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
2h 15m

Articles

Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil


John Berendt's original 1994 book Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil was a work of non-fiction told in novel form, ostensibly a portrait of the antebellum culture of Savannah, Georgia, as told by a visiting writer turned resident Berendt, that becomes a true-life crime story: a rich antique dealer and member of the city's social aristocracy, Jim Williams, was accused of murdering his younger lover, a male prostitute named Danny Hansford. The book, rich in atmosphere and filled with vivid characters and larger-than-life personalities, became a bestseller, remaining on The New York Times list for 216 weeks.

Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil (1997) was not a typical Clint Eastwood project. The book was a meandering portrait of a town and a culture with numerous diversions and supporting characters and a murder mystery weaving through the narrative, but it nonetheless intrigued the director. "This isn't the South the way it's portrayed most of the time, with an overabundance of clichés," he explained. His intention was to show modern Savannah society as "sophisticated, cultured, intelligent, very much in the public view, people no one would ever think could be interested in sorcery."

It was Clint Eastwood's twentieth feature as a director but only his third directorial effort in which he did not appear on screen. John Cusack took the lead, playing a fictional replacement for the author, renamed Kelso for the film and given an active role in the story beyond mere observer. Kevin Spacey, fresh from an Oscar®-winning turn in The Usual Suspects (1994), brings an easy confidence and lived-in drawl to the charming, enigmatic Williams. The actor spent weeks researching the part in Savannah, talking to people who knew the real person and soaking up the atmosphere. Jude Law, whose star was on the rise (he appeared in Wilde and Gattaca the same year Midnight was released), is his lover and murder victim (renamed Billy Hanson for the film). Mandy, a minor character in the book, was changed and expanded for the film, transforming her into a flirtatious love interest for Kelso. The part was tailored for Alison Eastwood, Clint's daughter, as a way to launch her fledgling acting career with a substantial role.

The original book, often described as a "non-fiction novel" in the manner of Truman Capote and Norman Mailer, was not strictly reportage; Berendt rearranged events for dramatic effect. The screen adaptation by John Lee Hancock (who scripted A Perfect World [1993] for Eastwood) continued the process, paring away side stories and supporting characters to focus on Williams, and condensing his unprecedented four murder trials (a record number for the state of Georgia) into a single courtroom trial. But Eastwood made a concerted effort to capture the atmosphere that the book so vividly communicated by shooting on location and using locals as extras and in small roles. "I liked the atmosphere of Savannah.... It's a town with a tremendous history and an interesting social structure." He cast the real-life Lady Chablis, the preoperative transsexual woman and local drag queen who was such an integral part of the book, to play herself, and Sonny Seiler, the real-life attorney who represented Jim Williams in his trial, took the gavel as the judge on screen. (Australian actor Jack Thompson played Sonny for the film, appearing opposite his real-life counterpart in the courtroom scenes.) The movie recreates two of Jim Williams' legendary parties from the book and Eastwood invited many of the real-life partygoers to appear in these screen recreations.

One aspect which appealed directly to Eastwood's interests is that much of the story took place in Mercer House, the family mansion built by the grandfather of legendary songwriter Johnny Mercer and purchased and restored by Jim Williams in 1968. Eastwood, an aficionado of jazz and the classic American songbook and a jazz pianist in his own right, was a longtime fan of Mercer (he later produced the 2009 documentary Johnny Mercer: The Dream's on Me). Eastwood was able to shoot on location at the mansion and he filled the soundtrack with Mercer songs, performed by such artists as Tony Bennett, k.d. lang, and Diana Krall, as well as Clint and Alison Eastwood themselves.

Film critic and Eastwood biographer Richard Schickel described Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil as "the most languid film Clint ever made...." It ended up one of the few financial failures of the director's career, failing to even make back its negative cost on its theatrical release. And the film became embroiled in a minor controversy because of its poster, which featured an image of the "Bird Girl" sculpture at Savannah's Bonaventure Cemetery, made famous when it was featured on the book cover on its original release. The sculpture became synonymous with the book and turned into a tourist attraction in Savannah. It was a logical defining image for the poster, but the studio was sued by the photographer, who maintained that their use of the image was nearly identical to his original photo. The suit was settled out of court.

Producers: Clint Eastwood, Arnold Stiefel
Director: Clint Eastwood
Screenplay: John Lee Hancock (screenplay); John Berendt (book)
Cinematography: Jack N. Green
Art Direction: Jack G. Taylor, Jr.
Music: Lennie Niehaus
Film Editing: Joel Cox
Cast: John Cusack (John Kelso), Kevin Spacey (Jim Williams), Jack Thompson (Sonny Seiler), Irma P. Hall (Minerva), Jude Law (Billy Hanson), Alison Eastwood (Mandy Nicholls), Paul Hipp (Joe Odom), The Lady Chablis (Chablis Deveau), Dorothy Loudon (Serena Dawes), Anne Haney (Margaret Williams).
C-155m.

by Sean Axmaker

Bibliography
"American Rebel: The Life of Clint Eastwood," Marc Eliot. Harmony, 2009.
"Eastwood: A Biography," Richard Schickel. Knopf, 1996
"Clint: A Retrospective," Richard Schickel. Sterling, 2010.
IMDB
Midnight In The Garden Of Good And Evil

Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil

John Berendt's original 1994 book Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil was a work of non-fiction told in novel form, ostensibly a portrait of the antebellum culture of Savannah, Georgia, as told by a visiting writer turned resident Berendt, that becomes a true-life crime story: a rich antique dealer and member of the city's social aristocracy, Jim Williams, was accused of murdering his younger lover, a male prostitute named Danny Hansford. The book, rich in atmosphere and filled with vivid characters and larger-than-life personalities, became a bestseller, remaining on The New York Times list for 216 weeks. Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil (1997) was not a typical Clint Eastwood project. The book was a meandering portrait of a town and a culture with numerous diversions and supporting characters and a murder mystery weaving through the narrative, but it nonetheless intrigued the director. "This isn't the South the way it's portrayed most of the time, with an overabundance of clichés," he explained. His intention was to show modern Savannah society as "sophisticated, cultured, intelligent, very much in the public view, people no one would ever think could be interested in sorcery." It was Clint Eastwood's twentieth feature as a director but only his third directorial effort in which he did not appear on screen. John Cusack took the lead, playing a fictional replacement for the author, renamed Kelso for the film and given an active role in the story beyond mere observer. Kevin Spacey, fresh from an Oscar®-winning turn in The Usual Suspects (1994), brings an easy confidence and lived-in drawl to the charming, enigmatic Williams. The actor spent weeks researching the part in Savannah, talking to people who knew the real person and soaking up the atmosphere. Jude Law, whose star was on the rise (he appeared in Wilde and Gattaca the same year Midnight was released), is his lover and murder victim (renamed Billy Hanson for the film). Mandy, a minor character in the book, was changed and expanded for the film, transforming her into a flirtatious love interest for Kelso. The part was tailored for Alison Eastwood, Clint's daughter, as a way to launch her fledgling acting career with a substantial role. The original book, often described as a "non-fiction novel" in the manner of Truman Capote and Norman Mailer, was not strictly reportage; Berendt rearranged events for dramatic effect. The screen adaptation by John Lee Hancock (who scripted A Perfect World [1993] for Eastwood) continued the process, paring away side stories and supporting characters to focus on Williams, and condensing his unprecedented four murder trials (a record number for the state of Georgia) into a single courtroom trial. But Eastwood made a concerted effort to capture the atmosphere that the book so vividly communicated by shooting on location and using locals as extras and in small roles. "I liked the atmosphere of Savannah.... It's a town with a tremendous history and an interesting social structure." He cast the real-life Lady Chablis, the preoperative transsexual woman and local drag queen who was such an integral part of the book, to play herself, and Sonny Seiler, the real-life attorney who represented Jim Williams in his trial, took the gavel as the judge on screen. (Australian actor Jack Thompson played Sonny for the film, appearing opposite his real-life counterpart in the courtroom scenes.) The movie recreates two of Jim Williams' legendary parties from the book and Eastwood invited many of the real-life partygoers to appear in these screen recreations. One aspect which appealed directly to Eastwood's interests is that much of the story took place in Mercer House, the family mansion built by the grandfather of legendary songwriter Johnny Mercer and purchased and restored by Jim Williams in 1968. Eastwood, an aficionado of jazz and the classic American songbook and a jazz pianist in his own right, was a longtime fan of Mercer (he later produced the 2009 documentary Johnny Mercer: The Dream's on Me). Eastwood was able to shoot on location at the mansion and he filled the soundtrack with Mercer songs, performed by such artists as Tony Bennett, k.d. lang, and Diana Krall, as well as Clint and Alison Eastwood themselves. Film critic and Eastwood biographer Richard Schickel described Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil as "the most languid film Clint ever made...." It ended up one of the few financial failures of the director's career, failing to even make back its negative cost on its theatrical release. And the film became embroiled in a minor controversy because of its poster, which featured an image of the "Bird Girl" sculpture at Savannah's Bonaventure Cemetery, made famous when it was featured on the book cover on its original release. The sculpture became synonymous with the book and turned into a tourist attraction in Savannah. It was a logical defining image for the poster, but the studio was sued by the photographer, who maintained that their use of the image was nearly identical to his original photo. The suit was settled out of court. Producers: Clint Eastwood, Arnold Stiefel Director: Clint Eastwood Screenplay: John Lee Hancock (screenplay); John Berendt (book) Cinematography: Jack N. Green Art Direction: Jack G. Taylor, Jr. Music: Lennie Niehaus Film Editing: Joel Cox Cast: John Cusack (John Kelso), Kevin Spacey (Jim Williams), Jack Thompson (Sonny Seiler), Irma P. Hall (Minerva), Jude Law (Billy Hanson), Alison Eastwood (Mandy Nicholls), Paul Hipp (Joe Odom), The Lady Chablis (Chablis Deveau), Dorothy Loudon (Serena Dawes), Anne Haney (Margaret Williams). C-155m. by Sean Axmaker Bibliography "American Rebel: The Life of Clint Eastwood," Marc Eliot. Harmony, 2009. "Eastwood: A Biography," Richard Schickel. Knopf, 1996 "Clint: A Retrospective," Richard Schickel. Sterling, 2010. IMDB

TCM Remembers - Kim Hunter


KIM HUNTER, 1922-2002

Kim Hunter, the versatile, distinguished actress who won the Supporting Actress Academy Award for her portrayal as the long-suffering Stella in A Streetcar Named Desire (1951) and appeared as Dr. Zira in three Planet of the Apes movies, died in her Greenwich Village apartment from an apparent heart attack on September 11, 2002. She was 79.

Born Janet Cole in Detroit on November 12, 1922, where her mother was a concert pianist, she made her professional debut at 17 with a small theatre company in Miami. She gained notice immediately with her strong voice and alluring presence, and eventually studied at the Actors' Studio in New York.

She made a striking film debut in an eerie, low-budget RKO horror film, The Seventh Victim (1943), produced by Val Lewton. She played a similar ingenue role in another stylish cult flick, When Strangers Meet (1944) - a film directed by William Castle and notable for featuring Robert Mitchum in one of his first starring roles. Hunter's big break came two years later when Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger cast her in their splendid romantic fantasy, Stairway to Heaven (1946).

Despite her growing popularity as a screen actress, Hunter returned to the stage to make her Broadway debut as Stella in Tennessee Williams'A Streetcar Named Desire (1951). When Elia Kazan adapted the production for the silver screen, she continued her role as Stella opposite Marlon Brando, and won an Oscar as best supporting actress. A few more film roles followed, but sadly her screen career entered a lull in the late 1950s, after Hunter, a liberal Democrat, was listed as a communist sympathizer by Red Channels, a red-hunting booklet that influenced hiring by studios and the Television networks. Kim was blacklisted from both mediums despite never having been labeled a Communist, yet as a strong believer in civil rights she signed a lot of petitions and was a sponsor of a 1949 World Peace Conference in New York. She was widely praised in the industry for her testimony to the New York Supreme Court in 1962 against the publishers of Red Channels, and helped pave the way for clearance of many performers unjustly accused of Communist associations.

Hunter spent the next few years on the stage and didn't make a strong impression again in films until she was cast as Dr. Zira in the Planet of the Apes (1968), as a simian psychiatrist in the classic science fiction film. The success of that film encouraged her to continue playing the same character in two back-to-back sequels - Beneath the Planet of the Apes (1970) and Escape from the Planet of the Apes (1971). Hunter spent the remainder of her career on the stage and television, but she a terrific cameo role in Clint Eastwood's Midnight In The Garden Of Good And Evil (1997), one of her last films. She is survived by her daughter Kathryn, from her first marriage to William Baldwin, and her son Sean, from her marriage to actor and producer Robert Emmett.

By Michael T. Toole

TCM REMEMBERS J. LEE THOMPSON, 1914 - 2002

Oscar-nominated director J. Lee Thompson died August 30th at the age of 88. Though he worked in several genres, Thompson was best-known for his action films. Thompson was born in Bristol England on August 1, 1914. After graduating from college he became a playwright and it was the appearance of one of his plays on London's famous West End that got him noticed by the British film studio, Elstree. His first filmed script was The Pride of Folly in 1937 and others appeared sporadically until his career was side-tracked during the war when Thompson served in the RAF as a B-29 tail gunner. (He also reportedly worked as a dialogue coach on Hitchcock's Jamaica Inn, 1939.) Thompson's directorial debut came in 1950 when he adapted his own play Double Error to the screen as Murder Without Crime. Throughout the decade he directed a variety of dramas and comedies until hitting it big in 1958 with Ice Cold in Alex (released in the US minus 50 minutes under the title Desert Attack). It was nominated for three BAFTAs and was enough of a commercial success that Thompson landed the film that made his career: The Guns of Navarone (1961). This enormous international hit snagged Thompson an Oscar nomination for Best Director. He immediately followed that with the original Cape Fear (1962) and his reputation was set. Though Thompson remained active almost three more decades he didn't reach that level again. He worked on Westerns (Mackenna's Gold, 1969), horror films (Eye of the Devil, 1967), literary adaptations (Huckleberry Finn, 1974) and others. During this time, Thompson directed two Planet of the Apes sequels but was kept most busy working with Charles Bronson, for whom he directed nine films. Thompson's last film was in 1989.

KATRIN CARTLIDGE, 1961 - 2002

The news of actress Katrin Cartlidge's death at the age of 41 has come as a shock. It's not just the age but the thought that even though Cartlidge was already a major actress--despite a slender filmography--she held out the promise of even greater work, a promise that so few artists of any type can make. "Fearless" is perhaps the word most often used to describe Cartlidge but emotions are never enough for an actor; much more is required. Director Mike Leigh said she had "the objective eye of an artist" while remarking on her "her deep-seated suspicion of all forms of woolly thinking and received ideas."

Cartlidge was born in London on May 15, 1961. Her first acting work was on the stage, in tiny independent theatres before she was selected by Peter Gill for the National Theatre. Cartlidge also worked as a dresser at the Royal Court where she later made one of her final stage appearances. She began appearing in the popular British TV series Brookside before making her first film in 1985, Sacred Hearts. A small role in the Robbie Coltrane-Rik Mayall vehicle Eat the Rich (1987) followed before Cartlidge had her first leading role in Mike Leigh's scathing Naked (1993).

Cartlidge never took a safe approach in her films. She told The Guardian that "I try to work with film-makers who I feel will produce something original, revealing and provoking. If something provokes a reaction, it's well worth doing." You can see this in her choice of projects. Before the Rain (1994) dramatized violence in Macedonia in the wake of the Yugoslavian break-up and made Cartlidge something of a star in the area. She appeared in Lars Von Trier's controversial look at redemption, Breaking the Waves (1996), Leigh's sharply detailed story of aging friends Career Girls (1997), as one of Jack the Ripper's victims in From Hell (2001), as a call girl trying to leave the business in Clair Dolan (1998) and in the Oscar-winning film about Bosnia-Herzegovina, No Man's Land (2001). Her last work included a BBC adaptation of Crime and Punishment (2002), playing Salvador Dali's wife Gala in the BBC comedy-drama Surrealissimo (2002) and an appearance in Rosanna Arquette's directorial debut, Searching for Debra Winger (also 2002), a documentary about women in the film industry.

Cartlidge died September 7th from septicaemia brought on by pneumonia.

By Lang Thompson

TCM Remembers - Kim Hunter

KIM HUNTER, 1922-2002 Kim Hunter, the versatile, distinguished actress who won the Supporting Actress Academy Award for her portrayal as the long-suffering Stella in A Streetcar Named Desire (1951) and appeared as Dr. Zira in three Planet of the Apes movies, died in her Greenwich Village apartment from an apparent heart attack on September 11, 2002. She was 79. Born Janet Cole in Detroit on November 12, 1922, where her mother was a concert pianist, she made her professional debut at 17 with a small theatre company in Miami. She gained notice immediately with her strong voice and alluring presence, and eventually studied at the Actors' Studio in New York. She made a striking film debut in an eerie, low-budget RKO horror film, The Seventh Victim (1943), produced by Val Lewton. She played a similar ingenue role in another stylish cult flick, When Strangers Meet (1944) - a film directed by William Castle and notable for featuring Robert Mitchum in one of his first starring roles. Hunter's big break came two years later when Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger cast her in their splendid romantic fantasy, Stairway to Heaven (1946). Despite her growing popularity as a screen actress, Hunter returned to the stage to make her Broadway debut as Stella in Tennessee Williams'A Streetcar Named Desire (1951). When Elia Kazan adapted the production for the silver screen, she continued her role as Stella opposite Marlon Brando, and won an Oscar as best supporting actress. A few more film roles followed, but sadly her screen career entered a lull in the late 1950s, after Hunter, a liberal Democrat, was listed as a communist sympathizer by Red Channels, a red-hunting booklet that influenced hiring by studios and the Television networks. Kim was blacklisted from both mediums despite never having been labeled a Communist, yet as a strong believer in civil rights she signed a lot of petitions and was a sponsor of a 1949 World Peace Conference in New York. She was widely praised in the industry for her testimony to the New York Supreme Court in 1962 against the publishers of Red Channels, and helped pave the way for clearance of many performers unjustly accused of Communist associations. Hunter spent the next few years on the stage and didn't make a strong impression again in films until she was cast as Dr. Zira in the Planet of the Apes (1968), as a simian psychiatrist in the classic science fiction film. The success of that film encouraged her to continue playing the same character in two back-to-back sequels - Beneath the Planet of the Apes (1970) and Escape from the Planet of the Apes (1971). Hunter spent the remainder of her career on the stage and television, but she a terrific cameo role in Clint Eastwood's Midnight In The Garden Of Good And Evil (1997), one of her last films. She is survived by her daughter Kathryn, from her first marriage to William Baldwin, and her son Sean, from her marriage to actor and producer Robert Emmett. By Michael T. Toole TCM REMEMBERS J. LEE THOMPSON, 1914 - 2002 Oscar-nominated director J. Lee Thompson died August 30th at the age of 88. Though he worked in several genres, Thompson was best-known for his action films. Thompson was born in Bristol England on August 1, 1914. After graduating from college he became a playwright and it was the appearance of one of his plays on London's famous West End that got him noticed by the British film studio, Elstree. His first filmed script was The Pride of Folly in 1937 and others appeared sporadically until his career was side-tracked during the war when Thompson served in the RAF as a B-29 tail gunner. (He also reportedly worked as a dialogue coach on Hitchcock's Jamaica Inn, 1939.) Thompson's directorial debut came in 1950 when he adapted his own play Double Error to the screen as Murder Without Crime. Throughout the decade he directed a variety of dramas and comedies until hitting it big in 1958 with Ice Cold in Alex (released in the US minus 50 minutes under the title Desert Attack). It was nominated for three BAFTAs and was enough of a commercial success that Thompson landed the film that made his career: The Guns of Navarone (1961). This enormous international hit snagged Thompson an Oscar nomination for Best Director. He immediately followed that with the original Cape Fear (1962) and his reputation was set. Though Thompson remained active almost three more decades he didn't reach that level again. He worked on Westerns (Mackenna's Gold, 1969), horror films (Eye of the Devil, 1967), literary adaptations (Huckleberry Finn, 1974) and others. During this time, Thompson directed two Planet of the Apes sequels but was kept most busy working with Charles Bronson, for whom he directed nine films. Thompson's last film was in 1989. KATRIN CARTLIDGE, 1961 - 2002 The news of actress Katrin Cartlidge's death at the age of 41 has come as a shock. It's not just the age but the thought that even though Cartlidge was already a major actress--despite a slender filmography--she held out the promise of even greater work, a promise that so few artists of any type can make. "Fearless" is perhaps the word most often used to describe Cartlidge but emotions are never enough for an actor; much more is required. Director Mike Leigh said she had "the objective eye of an artist" while remarking on her "her deep-seated suspicion of all forms of woolly thinking and received ideas." Cartlidge was born in London on May 15, 1961. Her first acting work was on the stage, in tiny independent theatres before she was selected by Peter Gill for the National Theatre. Cartlidge also worked as a dresser at the Royal Court where she later made one of her final stage appearances. She began appearing in the popular British TV series Brookside before making her first film in 1985, Sacred Hearts. A small role in the Robbie Coltrane-Rik Mayall vehicle Eat the Rich (1987) followed before Cartlidge had her first leading role in Mike Leigh's scathing Naked (1993). Cartlidge never took a safe approach in her films. She told The Guardian that "I try to work with film-makers who I feel will produce something original, revealing and provoking. If something provokes a reaction, it's well worth doing." You can see this in her choice of projects. Before the Rain (1994) dramatized violence in Macedonia in the wake of the Yugoslavian break-up and made Cartlidge something of a star in the area. She appeared in Lars Von Trier's controversial look at redemption, Breaking the Waves (1996), Leigh's sharply detailed story of aging friends Career Girls (1997), as one of Jack the Ripper's victims in From Hell (2001), as a call girl trying to leave the business in Clair Dolan (1998) and in the Oscar-winning film about Bosnia-Herzegovina, No Man's Land (2001). Her last work included a BBC adaptation of Crime and Punishment (2002), playing Salvador Dali's wife Gala in the BBC comedy-drama Surrealissimo (2002) and an appearance in Rosanna Arquette's directorial debut, Searching for Debra Winger (also 2002), a documentary about women in the film industry. Cartlidge died September 7th from septicaemia brought on by pneumonia. By Lang Thompson

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Nominated for Outstanding Wide-Release Film by the Gay & Lesbian Alliance Against Defamation (GLAAD) Media Awards.

Released in United States Fall November 21, 1997

Released in United States on Video June 2, 1998

Released in United States February 1998

Shown at Berlin International Film Festival (in competition) February 11-22, 1998.

The book is based on actual events that occurred before and during the author's sojourn in Savannah.

Began shooting May 5, 1997.

Completed shooting July 15, 1997.

Released in United States Fall November 21, 1997

Released in United States on Video June 2, 1998

Released in United States February 1998 (Shown at Berlin International Film Festival (in competition) February 11-22, 1998.)