Cops And Robbersons


1h 35m 1994

Brief Synopsis

Meet the Robbersons, the very model of the '90s suburban family. There's Norman, a mild-mannered accountant who's addicted to TV cop shows. Helen Robberson is supermom, equally adept at whipping up a lobster crab souffle or a functioning volcano for her son's latest science project. Then there's vet

Film Details

MPAA Rating
PG
Genre
Comedy
Thriller
Release Date
1994
Production Company
Brydon Bertram Baker III
Distribution Company
TriStar Pictures
Location
Sony Pictures Studios, Culver City, California, USA; Los Angeles, California, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 35m

Synopsis

Meet the Robbersons, the very model of the '90s suburban family. There's Norman, a mild-mannered accountant who's addicted to TV cop shows. Helen Robberson is supermom, equally adept at whipping up a lobster crab souffle or a functioning volcano for her son's latest science project. Then there's veteran cop Jake Stone, who knows only one way to get things done--alone--and hates nothing more than interfering civilians. On the trail of a mobster named Osborn, Jake finds out that he's holed up in a house in the suburbs. Taking along his unwanted rookie partner, Jake becomes Osborn's new neighbor, staking out the gangster from the Robberson's house. The problem is, Jake is being staked out too--by Norman, Helen and the three Robberson kids.

Crew

Peter Afterman

Music Supervisor

Pamela Alch

Script Supervisor

Mark Anderson

Assistant Camera Operator

Harold Arlen

Song

James Ashwill

Foley Mixer

Christopher Aud

Sound Editor

Rick Avery

Stunts

Brydon Bertram Baker Iii

Cable Operator

Sidney R. Baldwin

Photography

Tracy Barone

Associate Producer

Rita Bellissimo

Hair Stylist

Tricia Bercsi

Costumes

Sharon Bialy

Casting

Bo Diddley

Song Performer

Jana Brooks

Stunts

Michael Caiozzo

Construction Coordinator

Kathleen Callahan

Assistant

Greg Callas

Construction Coordinator

Bill Cancienne

Assistant Property Master

Harry Cheney

Sound Editor

Susan Chernus

Assistant Editor

Albert Cho

Assistant Director

Jeff Clark

Assistant Camera Operator

David B Cohn

Adr Editor

Damon Cohoon

Apprentice

Clayton Collins

Sound Editor

Tom Connole

Camera Operator

Mike Connors

Dolly Grip

Kurt Courtland

Assistant Sound Editor

Steve Cowie

Production Assistant

Gary L Dagg

Key Grip

Howard Davidson

Transportation Captain

Huw Davies

Location Manager

Lisa Davis

Apprentice

Steve Day

Production Assistant

Caroline Digiulio

Production Assistant

Willie Dixon

Song

Bryan Dresden

Assistant Director

John M. Elliott Jr.

Makeup Artist

Steve Ellsworth

Costumes

Dan Etheridge

Assistant

Dane Farwell

Stunts

Gary Fettis

Set Decorator

Wayne Finkelman

Costume Designer

Gerry Fisher

Director Of Photography

Frank Foster

Titles

Thomas W Foster

Other

Douglas Fox

Property Master

Nerses Gezalyan

Foley Recordist

Don Hall Jr.

Sound Editor

Lee C Harman

Makeup

Jim Harrison

Music Editor

Gary Hecker

Foley Artist

Tory Herald

Casting Associate

Gilbert S Hernandez

Costumes

Mildred Hill

Song

Patty Hill

Song

Richard Hoffenberg

Props

Bruce R Hogard

Costume Supervisor

Larry Holt

Stunts

Vaughn Horton

Song

K J Jag

Assistant Production Accountant

Roxanne Jones

Foley Editor

Elyse Katz

Production Coordinator

Michael Kehoe

Craft Service

Joe Kelly

Dolly Grip

Mark Lapointe

Sound Editor

Catt Lebaigue

Sound Editor

Stephen J Lineweaver

Production Designer

Christi Manders

Other

Mark L. Mangino

Sound Editor

Debra L. Manwiller

Casting

Antonio Martinez Garcia

Assistant

Brian Mceachen

Best Boy

James M Mcewen

Lighting Technician

Peter Mckernan

Other

Johnny Mercer

Song

David Clayton Miller

Production Assistant

Todd Park Mohr

Song

Tom Morga

Stunts

Deborah Newman

Assistant Property Master

Dan O'connell

Foley Artist

Kim Ornitz

Sound Mixer

David Orr

Color Timer

Robert Osterman

Makeup Artist

Richard Pagano

Casting

Patti Page

Song Performer

Gary D Paulsen

Transportation Co-Captain

John Platt

Stunts

Joseph Ponticelle

Assistant Camera Operator

Jason Poteet

Grip

Darryl Pryor

Production Assistant

Roger J Pugliese

Unit Production Manager

Sergio Reyes

Sound Re-Recording Mixer

Lauren Ritchie

Assistant Production Coordinator

Eric Roberts

Special Effects

Stephen F Robinett

Hair Stylist

John Robotham

Stunts

Bill Roe

Camera Operator

William Ross

Music

Stephen Rotter

Editor

Miklos Rozsa

Song

Stacy Saravo

Assistant Sound Editor

William S. Scharf

Editor

Walter Schumann

Song

Ronald L Schwary

Producer

Susan Carol Schwary

Hair Stylist

B Tennyson Sebastian Ii

Sound Re-Recording Mixer

Albert Shapiro

Assistant Director

Paul Simon

Song

Paul Simon

Song Performer

Bernie Somers

Screenplay

Joanie Spates

Assistant Production Accountant

Scott Spiegal

Assistant Camera Operator

Teresa Ekwall Spiegel

Assistant

John J Stephens

Sound Re-Recording Mixer

Morton Stevens

Theme Music

Donald Sylvester

Sound Editor

Nancy Tanen

Producer

Ned Tanen

Producer

Tink Ten Eyck

Production Accountant

Gary Theard

Boom Operator

Steven Ticknor

Sound Editor

Tara Timpone

Assistant Editor

Philip Toolin

Art Director

Chuck Waters

Stunt Coordinator

Jim Waters

Stunts

Clifford P Wenger

Special Effects Supervisor

George Wilbur

Stunts

John Wilde

Sound Editor

David L Wolfson

Assistant Location Manager

Charles W Wright

Song

Charles W Wright

Song Performer

Film Details

MPAA Rating
PG
Genre
Comedy
Thriller
Release Date
1994
Production Company
Brydon Bertram Baker III
Distribution Company
TriStar Pictures
Location
Sony Pictures Studios, Culver City, California, USA; Los Angeles, California, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 35m

Articles

TCM Remembers - Michael Ritchie


Director Michael Ritchie died April 16th at the age of 62. A Wisconsin native, Ritchie studied at Harvard before succumbing to the attractions of the theatre. He started working in television during the 1960s where he directed episodes of The Big Valley and The Man from UNCLE among others. He moved into feature films with Downhill Racer (1969) at star Robert Redford's invitation and later directed Redford again in The Candidate (1972). The latter is a classic look at American political life that hasn't lost any of its power or insights over the years. This was the start of Ritchie's most productive period when he made several films that were both popular and critically acclaimed. You can find his sly wit and sense of critical drama in Smile (1975), The Bad News Bears (1976) and Semi-Tough (1978). By the 1980s, though, Ritchie's films focused less on social criticism and more on stars. The Survivors (1983) with Robin Williams remains under-rated but Ritchie-directed vehicles for Eddie Murphy (1986's The Golden Child), Bette Midler (1980's Divine Madness) and Chevy Chase (two Fletch films) didn't quite achieve their potential. Some of the old Ritchie spark and intelligence appeared in the made-for-cable The Positively True Adventures of the Alleged Texas Cheerleader-Murdering Mom (1993) which earned him a Directors Guild Award. One of his final films was the long-awaited screen adaptation of The Fantasticks (1995) which partly brought Ritchie back to his theatrical roots.

ANN SOTHERN: 1909 - 2001
Actress Ann Sothern passed away on March 15th at the age of 89. Her film career spanned sixty years and included a Best Supporting Actress Oscar nomination for The Whales of August (1987) and several Emmy nominations for her roles in the TV shows Private Secretary (1953) and The Ann Sothern Show (1958). Sothern was born as Harriette Lake in North Dakota. She made her first film appearance in 1927 in small roles (so small, in fact, that some sources omit any films before 1929) before deciding to work on Broadway instead. Shortly afterwards she signed with Columbia Pictures where studio head Harry Cohn insisted she change her name because there were already too many actors with the last name of Lake. So "Ann" came from her mother's name Annette and "Sothern" from Shakespearean actor E.H. Sothern. For most of the 1930s she appeared in light comedies working with Eddie Cantor, Maurice Chevalier, Mickey Rooney and Fredric March. However, it wasn't until she switched to MGM (after a brief period with RKO) and made the film Maisie (1939) that Sothern hit pay dirt. It proved enormously popular and led to a series of nine more films through 1947 when she moved into dramas and musicals. During the 50s, Sothern made a mark with her TV series but returned to mostly second tier movies in the 1960s and 1970s. Finally she earned an Oscar nomination for her work in 1987's The Whales of August (in which, incidentally, her daughter Tisha Sterling played her at an earlier age). Turner Classic Movies plans to host a retrospective film tribute to her in July. Check back for details in June.

Tcm Remembers - Michael Ritchie

TCM Remembers - Michael Ritchie

Director Michael Ritchie died April 16th at the age of 62. A Wisconsin native, Ritchie studied at Harvard before succumbing to the attractions of the theatre. He started working in television during the 1960s where he directed episodes of The Big Valley and The Man from UNCLE among others. He moved into feature films with Downhill Racer (1969) at star Robert Redford's invitation and later directed Redford again in The Candidate (1972). The latter is a classic look at American political life that hasn't lost any of its power or insights over the years. This was the start of Ritchie's most productive period when he made several films that were both popular and critically acclaimed. You can find his sly wit and sense of critical drama in Smile (1975), The Bad News Bears (1976) and Semi-Tough (1978). By the 1980s, though, Ritchie's films focused less on social criticism and more on stars. The Survivors (1983) with Robin Williams remains under-rated but Ritchie-directed vehicles for Eddie Murphy (1986's The Golden Child), Bette Midler (1980's Divine Madness) and Chevy Chase (two Fletch films) didn't quite achieve their potential. Some of the old Ritchie spark and intelligence appeared in the made-for-cable The Positively True Adventures of the Alleged Texas Cheerleader-Murdering Mom (1993) which earned him a Directors Guild Award. One of his final films was the long-awaited screen adaptation of The Fantasticks (1995) which partly brought Ritchie back to his theatrical roots. ANN SOTHERN: 1909 - 2001 Actress Ann Sothern passed away on March 15th at the age of 89. Her film career spanned sixty years and included a Best Supporting Actress Oscar nomination for The Whales of August (1987) and several Emmy nominations for her roles in the TV shows Private Secretary (1953) and The Ann Sothern Show (1958). Sothern was born as Harriette Lake in North Dakota. She made her first film appearance in 1927 in small roles (so small, in fact, that some sources omit any films before 1929) before deciding to work on Broadway instead. Shortly afterwards she signed with Columbia Pictures where studio head Harry Cohn insisted she change her name because there were already too many actors with the last name of Lake. So "Ann" came from her mother's name Annette and "Sothern" from Shakespearean actor E.H. Sothern. For most of the 1930s she appeared in light comedies working with Eddie Cantor, Maurice Chevalier, Mickey Rooney and Fredric March. However, it wasn't until she switched to MGM (after a brief period with RKO) and made the film Maisie (1939) that Sothern hit pay dirt. It proved enormously popular and led to a series of nine more films through 1947 when she moved into dramas and musicals. During the 50s, Sothern made a mark with her TV series but returned to mostly second tier movies in the 1960s and 1970s. Finally she earned an Oscar nomination for her work in 1987's The Whales of August (in which, incidentally, her daughter Tisha Sterling played her at an earlier age). Turner Classic Movies plans to host a retrospective film tribute to her in July. Check back for details in June.

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States Spring April 15, 1994

Released in United States on Video November 16, 1994

Completed shooting May 18, 1993.

Began shooting March 8, 1993.

Released in United States Spring April 15, 1994

Released in United States on Video November 16, 1994