L.A. Confidential


2h 15m 1997
L.A. Confidential

Brief Synopsis

Detectives clash while investigating political corruption.

Film Details

Also Known As
L.A. konfidentiellt
MPAA Rating
Genre
Romance
Drama
Action
Crime
Mystery
Thriller
Period
Adaptation
Film Noir
Release Date
1997
Production Company
20th Century Fox Studio Facilities; Associated Press; Budget Films Inc; Chapman/Leonard Studio Equipment, Inc.; City of Los Angeles; Film L.A., Inc.; Framestore Cfc; Getty Images; Howard Anderson Company; Image Bank; Michaelson'S Catering; New Regency Productions; Panavision, Ltd.; Paramount Pictures; Streamline Archives; Studio Animal Services; Technicolor; The Wolper Organization; Title House, Inc.; Todd-Ao; UCLA Film & Television Archives; Universal Clearances; Vista Group; Warner Bros. Pictures International; Wpa Film Library
Distribution Company
WARNER BROS. PICTURES DISTRIBUTION (WBPD); Bbc Worldwide; Sam Film; Village Roadshow Limited; Warner Bros. Home Entertainment Group; Warner Bros. Pictures Distribution; Warner Bros. Pictures International
Location
Los Angeles, California, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
2h 15m

Synopsis

Set against the glamorous backdrop of 1950's Los Angeles, Sid Hudgeons is the sleazy reporter for the tabloid "Hush-Hush" who has always helped ferret out a scandal that Sid can mine for a potential celebrity bust. Jack Vincennes is a celebrity cop who serves as the technical advisor for a TV show called "Badge of Honor." He becomes involved in a murder investigation which will link him to a web of corruption and scandal involving fellow detectives Ed Exley and Bud White. White and Exley are involved with Lynn Bracken, a woman who is the key to a murder investigation both men are trying to solve under the watchful eyes of the DA and the entire police department.

Cast

Kevin Spacey

Jack Vincennes

Russell Crowe

Bud White

Kim Basinger

Lynn Bracken

Guy Pearce

Editor Exley

James Cromwell

Dudley Smith

Danny De Vito

Sid Hudgens

David Strathairn

Pierce Patchett

Ron Rifkin

District Attorney Ellis Loew

Matt Mccoy

'Badge Of Honor' Star Brett Chase

Paul Guilfoyle

Mickey Cohen

Paolo Seganti

Johnny Stompanato

Elisabeth Granli

Mickey Cohen'S Mambo Partner

Sandra Taylor

Mickey Cohen'S Mambo Partner

Steve Rankin

Officer Arresting Mickey Cohen

Graham Beckel

Dick Stensland

Allan Graf

Wife Beater

Precious Chong

Wife

Symba Smith

Jack'S Dancing Partner

Robert Clendenin

Lennie Loftin

Photographer At Hollywood Station

Will Zahrn

Liquor Store Owner

Amber Smith

Susan Lefferts

Darrell Sandeen

Buzz Meeks

Michael Warwick

Sid'S Assistant

Simon Baker-denny

Matt Reynolds

Shawnee Free Jones

Tammy Jordan

Matthew Allen Bretz

Officer Escorting Mexicans

Thomas Rosales Jr.

1st Mexican

Shane Dixon

Officer--Detective At Hollywood Station

Norman Howell

Officer--Detective At Hollywood Station

Brian Lally

Officer--Detective At Hollywood Station

Don Pulford

Officer--Detective At Hollywood Station

Chris Short

Officer--Detective At Hollywood Station

John Mahon

Police Chief

Tomas Arana

Breuning--Dudley'S Guy

Michael Mccleery

Carlisle--Dudley'S Guy

George Yager

Gangster At Victory Motel

Jack Conley

Vice Captain

Ginger Slaughter

Secretary In Vice

Jack Knight

Detective At Detective Bureau

John H. Evans

Patrolman At Nite Owl Cafe

Gene Wolande

Forensic Chief

Brian Bossetta

Forensic Officer

Michael Chieffo

Coroner

Gwenda Deacon

Mrs Lefferts

Mike Kennedy

Bud'S Rejected Partner

Ingo Neuhaus

Jack'S Rejected Partner

Robert Harrison

Pierce Patchett'S Bodyguard

Jim Metzler

City Councilman

Robert Barry Fleming

Boxer

Jeremiah W Birkett

Ray Collins (Nite Owl Suspect)

Salim Grant

Louis Fontaine (Nite Owl Suspect)

Karreem Washington

Ty Jones (Nite Owl Suspect)

Noel Evangelisti

Stenographer

Marisol Padilla Sanchez

Inez Soto (Rape Victim)

Jeff Sanders

Sylvester Fitch

Steve Lambert

Roland Navarette

Jordan Marder

Officer At Detective Bureau

Gregory White

Mayor

April Breneman

Look-Alike Dancer

Lisa Worthy

Look-Alike Dancer

Beverly Sharpe

Witness On

Colin Mitchell

Reporter At Hospital

John Slade

Photographer At Hospital

Brenda Bakke

Lana Turner

Kevin Maloney

Frolic Room Bartender

Patrice Walters

Police File Clerk

Rebecca Klingler

Police File Clerk

Irene Roseen

District Attorney Ellis Loew'S Secretary

Scott Eberlein

West Hollywood Sheriff'S Deputy

David St James

Detective At Hush-Hush Office

Bodie Newcomb

Officer At Hush-Hush Office

Jeff Austin

Detective

Henry Meyers

Detective

Robert Foster

Detective

Michael Ossman

Detective

Kevin Kelly

Detective

Dick Stilwell

Detective

Henry Marder

Detective

Jess Thomas

Detective

Monty Mckee

Detective

Samuel Thompson

Detective

Jody Wood

Detective

Malcolm Mcnab

Performer

Scott Bailey

Lead Person

Kevin Kelly

Crew

Elizabeth Abate

Special Effects

G Roger Abell

Swing Gang

Renee Lee Alito

Construction

David Amberik

Driver

Alex Anderson

Song ("Mele Kalikimaka")

Lance Anderson

Makeup Artist

James Apted

Camera Loader

Harold Arlen

Songs ("Ac-Cent-Tchu-Ate The Positive" "Hit The Road To Dreamland")

William David Arnold

Art Director

Rick Avery

Stunts

Chet Baker

Song Performer ("Look For The Silver Lining" "Makin' Whoopee")

Randy Barrett

Grip

Michael Battaglia

Unit Publicist

John Baumhauer

Set Production Assistant

Shauna Beal

Assistant (To Arnon Milchan)

Julie Beattie-iiams

Swing Gang

Bob Beher

Foley Editor

Anna Behlmer

Re-Recording Mixer

Bennie Benjamin

Songs ("Wheel Of Fortune" "How Important Can It Be")

Brian T Best

Apprentice Sound Editor

Beth Jochem Besterveld

1st Assistant Editor

Peter Bianco

Transportation Captain

Corwin Bibb

Electrician

Kai Blomberg

Swing Gang

Gary Blufer

Sound Effects Recordist

Kiim Bodner

Production Accountant

Louisa Bonnie

Set Designer

Bruce Botnick

Music Scoring Mixer

Joey Box

Stunts

Richard M. Brasic

Driver

Rick Broderman

Other

Chuck Brooks

Other

Troy Brown

Stunts

Nancy Bullock

Construction Accounting Assistant

Nancy Bullock

Other

John Bush

Transportation Co-Captain

Joe Bushkin

Song ("Oh! Look At Me Now")

Sammy Cahn

Song ("The Christmas Blues")

Hunter Cain

Set Production Assistant

John C Cales

Props Maker

Alex Carrillo

Props Maker Foreman

Javier Carrillo

Other

Javier Carrillo

Construction Foreman

Marila Chappelle

Post-Production Accountant

Richard Chouinard

Driver

Janis Clark

Key Hair Stylist

Ralph Clark

Other

Reed Cohan

Driver

Tommy Cole

Makeup Artist

Kay Colvin

Utility Sound Technician

Norm Compton

Stunts

Stephanie Cooney

Other

Danny Costa

Stunts

Carolyn Crittenden

Production Office Coordinator

Bing Crosby

Song Performer ("Mele Kalikimaka")

Blaise R Dahlquist

Other

Blaise Dahlquist

Other

Bonnie Daniels

Production Controller

Al De Gaetano

Construction Buyer

Vince Deamicis

Driver

Dave Degaetano

Construction Coordinator

Russ Della

Driver

Mark S Derosa

Transportation Office Coordinator

Marc Deschaine

Adr Editor

Robert Deschane

Adr Recording Mixer

Bud Desilva

Song ("Look For The Silver Lining")

John Devries

Song

Keith Dillin

Transportation Coordinator

Gino Divitale

Driver

Joe Divitale

Sound Effects Editor

Walter Donaldson

Song ("Makin' Whoopee")

Peter Donen

Visual Effects Supervisor

Jessica Drake

Russell Crowe'S Dialect Coach

Michael Dressel

Foley Editor

Richard Drown

Stunts

Bob Duggan

Best Boy Grip

Jim Duggan

Key Rigging Grip

Jim Duggan

Key Rigging Grip

Doc Duhame

Stunts

Jeff Durling

Electrician

Joe Durrenberger

Stand-In

Gordon Ecker

Sound Effects Editor

Scott Eddo

Makeup Supervisor

Thom Ehle

Dolby Stereo Consultant

Al Eisenmann Ii

Assistant Property Master

John M. Elliott Jr.

Makeup Supervisor

James Ellroy

Source Material (Novel)

James Ellroy

Source Material (From Novel)

Jane English

Body Makeup (For Kim Basinger)

Gary Epper

Stunts

Ray Evans

Song ("Silver Bells")

Pablo Ferro

Main Title

Ralph J Fierro

Props Maker

Tracy Fikes

Props Maker

Mali Finn

Casting

Stephen Fischer

Assistant Location Manager

Sara Flamm

Other

Andy Flores

Other

Jim Flowers

Set Production Assistant

Kirk Francis

Production Sound Mixer

Sandra Freeman

Driver

Ed Galik

Props Maker

Carlos M Gallardo

Grip

Richie Gaona

Stunts

Frankie Garbutt

Stunts

Dariea Garibaldi

Stand-In

Lonnie Gatlin

Assistant Chief Lighting Technician

Steven Gerrior

Assistant Sound Editor

George Gershwin

Song ("But Not For Me")

Ira Gershwin

Song ("But Not For Me")

Moira Gill

Art Department Coordinator

Jackie Gleason

Song Performer ("But Not For Me")

Jerry Goldsmith

Music

Jim Goldthwait

2nd Assistant Director

Bradley L Gordon

Accounting Clerk

Mack Gordon

Song ("At Last")

Chris Grantz

Swing Gang

William N Green

Special Effects

Franz Gruber

Song ("Silent Night")

Lisa Grundy

Assistant (To Curtis Hanson)

Bob Hagman

Props Maker Foreman

Kenneth Hall

Music Editor

Curtis Hanson

Screenwriter

Curtis Hanson

Producer

Barbara Harris

Adr Voice Casting

Jay R. Hart

Set Decorator

Lorenz Hart

Song ("The Lady Is A Tramp")

Brian Helgeland

Screenwriter

Brian Helgeland

Other

Brian Helgeland

Co-Producer

Mo Henry

Negative Cutter

Bob Herron

Stunts

Robert Herron

Stunts

Daryl Herzon

Other

Stephen Hienrich

Driver

John K Hill

Labor Foreman

John Hinkle

Other

Hilda Hodges

Foley Artist

Marie Hoke

Other

Toby Holguin

Stunts

David Holt

Song ("The Christmas Blues")

Peter Honess

Editor

Andrea Horta

Adr Editor

Denise Horta

Adr Editor

Glenn Hoskinson

Sound Effects Editor

Mark D Houston

Accounting Clerk

Betty Hutton

Song Performer ("Hit The Road To Dreamland")

Jeff Imada

Stunt Coordinator

Kevin Lamont Jackson

Stunts

Joni James

Song Performer ("How Important Can It Be" (Performed On 'The Perry Como Show'))

Gary Jay

Camera Operator

Manny Jimenez

Grip

Fred Jin

Stunts

L Dean Jones

Unit Production Manager

Gail Just

Costumer

Gus Kahn

Song ("Makin' Whoopee")

Barry Kellogg

Costumer

Jerome Kern

Song ("Look For The Silver Lining")

Bruce Kerner

Sign Writer

Bob King

Special Effects

Bob King

Special Effects

Craig Kitson

Main Title Assistant Editor

Jerry L Knight

Driver

Dan Kolsrud

Executive Producer

Eric Kops

Publicity (Pogachefsky Company)

Kevin Koster

Dga Trainee

Anthony E Kountz

Set Production Assistant

Heather Kritzer

Second 2nd Assistant Director

Dave Krupnick

Construction Medic

Robert Lamkin

Other

Gene Lebell

Stunts

Linda Leiter-sharp

Hair Stylist

Fred M. Lerner

Stunts

John Leveque

Supervising Sound Editor

Julia Levine

Set Designer

Roger W. Lifsey

Special Effects

Diane Linn

Adr Recordist

Jay Livingston

Song ("Silver Bells")

Carmen Lombardo

Song ("Powder Your Face With Sunshine")

Lisa Lovaas

Costume Supervisor

Tom Lupo

Stunts

Tom Macdonald

Costumes

Tom Macdonald

Costumer

Steve Mann

Sound Effects Editor

Duane 'dc' Manwiller

1st Camera Assistant

Dean Martin

Song Performer ("The Christmas Blues" "Powder Your Face With Sunshine")

Lori Martino

Foley Editor

R Patrick Mcgee

Swing Gang

Patti Mcguire

Assistant Production Coordinator

Cheryl Mchugh

Payroll Accountant

John Meier

Stunts

John C. Meier

Stunts

Rochelle Mellon

Driver

Steven B. Melton

Property Master

Johnny Mercer

Song; Song ("Hit The Road To Dreamland")

Johnny Mercer

Song Performer ("Ac-Cent-Tchu-Ate The Positive")

Arnon Milchan

Producer

Joseph Mohr

Song ("Silent Night")

Linda Montanti

1st Assistant Director

Susan Montgomery

Production Accountant

Film Details

Also Known As
L.A. konfidentiellt
MPAA Rating
Genre
Romance
Drama
Action
Crime
Mystery
Thriller
Period
Adaptation
Film Noir
Release Date
1997
Production Company
20th Century Fox Studio Facilities; Associated Press; Budget Films Inc; Chapman/Leonard Studio Equipment, Inc.; City of Los Angeles; Film L.A., Inc.; Framestore Cfc; Getty Images; Howard Anderson Company; Image Bank; Michaelson'S Catering; New Regency Productions; Panavision, Ltd.; Paramount Pictures; Streamline Archives; Studio Animal Services; Technicolor; The Wolper Organization; Title House, Inc.; Todd-Ao; UCLA Film & Television Archives; Universal Clearances; Vista Group; Warner Bros. Pictures International; Wpa Film Library
Distribution Company
WARNER BROS. PICTURES DISTRIBUTION (WBPD); Bbc Worldwide; Sam Film; Village Roadshow Limited; Warner Bros. Home Entertainment Group; Warner Bros. Pictures Distribution; Warner Bros. Pictures International
Location
Los Angeles, California, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
2h 15m

Award Wins

Best Adapted Screenplay

1997

Best Supporting Actress

1997
Kim Basinger

Award Nominations

Set Decoration

1997

Best Cinematography

1997

Best Director

1997

Best Editing

1997

Best Picture

1997

Best Score (Dramatic Picture)

1997

Best Sound

1997

Articles

L.A. Confidential


Synopsis: Beneath the illusion of glamour, Los Angeles of the early 1950s is a corrupt and dangerous place. The Los Angeles Police Department sees--and sometimes participates in--the very worst of it. Some of the characters we encounter: Dudley Smith, the shrewd and streetwise Captain of the L.A.P.D. Ed Exley, the ambitious, clean-nosed and widely despised son of a legendary cop. Bud White, a specialist in domestic abuse cases who is prone to violence himself. Jack Vincennes, the slick consultant for Badge of Honor, a popular police show. Sid Hudgens, the editor for the tabloid publication Hush-Hush. And Lynn Bracken, a ringer for Veronica Lake. When a shooting rampage occurs at a cafe, the investigation leads in all sorts of directions, including the owner of a high-class prostitution ring and possibly someone in the police force itself.

One of the most highly acclaimed dramas of the 1990s, Curtis Hanson's L.A. Confidential (1997) is based on the 1990 novel of the same title by James Ellroy, arguably the leading crime writer today. Ellroy, who was born and raised in Los Angeles, has made the city his special turf, perhaps most spectacularly in the "L.A. Quartet" that includes The Black Dahlia (1987), The Big Nowhere (1988), White Jazz (1992) and this work. As his 1996 memoir My Dark Places details, crime has played a major role in his own life--his mother was murdered when he was ten years old and he spent much of his adolescence and early adult life in trouble with the law. His fiction is distinguished by a terse, punchy prose style that is invariably described as "staccato" and minutely detailed accounts of criminal investigations and police procedures. One of his most interesting earlier novels, The Black Dahlia, is a fictionalized attempt to crack the notorious 1947 murder case that remains officially unsolved to this day. In L.A. Confidential, Ellroy once again uses facts as his starting point, cleverly weaving in real-life people such as the crime boss Meyer Harris "Mickey" Cohen and Lana Turner's boyfriend Johnny Stompanato (who was later stabbed to death by her daughter, Cheryl Crane), locations such as the Frolic Room and the Formosa Café, and events such as Robert Mitchum's pot bust and the "Bloody Christmas" police abuse case.

At first glance, the source novel would seem difficult to adapt successfully for the screen. It has an exceedingly complex plot, dense with incident and intricate connections between the characters. Ellroy's legendary telegraphic style takes us directly inside the heads of his characters, who more often than not think the most unsavory thoughts; his prose is littered with arcane slang and racial epithets. Ellroy also introduces articles from the tabloid Hush-Hush and various newspapers, as well as police reports. This gives the reader a fragmented but multi-layered perspective on events. For the film, co-screenwriters Brian Helgeland and Curtis Hanson pared down and radically reshaped the plot to focus on the dynamics between the main characters. So while the film still has a complicated plot and an exceptionally large number of speaking parts (about eighty), it is more of a well-constructed film narrative in the usual sense. The screenwriters also use voice-over narration by Sid Hudgens (Danny DeVito), editor of Hush-Hush, to help create a unified tone and retain some of the pulpy flavor of Ellroy's style. In interviews, Ellroy has expressed great satisfaction with how the novel was adapted, and Helgeland and Hanson won an Academy Award for Best Adapted Screenplay.

Although L.A. Confidential has its share of nighttime scenes and shadows, Dante Spinotti as cinematographer wisely avoids excessive chiaroscuro effects, instead trying to create a realistic atmosphere. His chief source of visual inspiration was the work of Swiss-born photographer Robert Frank, whose 1958 book The Americans offered realistic, at times gritty images from a wide range of American society at that time. In an interview published in the October 1997 issue of American Cinematographer, Spinotti says: "I tried to compose shots as if I were using a still camera. I was constantly asking myself, 'Where would I be if I were holding a Leica?' This is one reason I suggested shooting in the Super 35 widescreen format; I wanted to use spherical lenses, which for me have a look and feel similar to still-photo work." He also took Frank's lead in using "practical" lights such as desk lamps as primary lighting sources, often incorporating them into the composition. While this occasionally results in "burn-outs" and halos around the lights, Spinotti embraced these effects as "enhancing the period and mood."

When L.A. Confidential was released it received the best reviews of Curtis Hanson's career. Kenneth Turan of the Los Angeles Times wrote that it "looks to be the definitive noir for this particular time and place," praising Hanson's "command of narrative drive," the film's ensemble acting, and its attention to period detail. Janet Maslin of the New York Times described it as a "vastly entertaining throwback to the Hollywood that did things right." Among its many awards and nominations--too many to list fully here--included Academy Award nominations for Best Picture, Director, Supporting Actress (Kim Basinger), Adapted Screenplay, Cinematography, Dramatic Score, Art Direction, Editing, and Sound. Ultimately only Kim Basinger and the co-screenwriters took home Oscars®, though one can't help but feel that it would have won more awards if it weren't competing with the Titanic juggernaut that year.

Executive Producers: David L. Wolper and Dan Kolsrud
Producers: Arnon Milchan and Michael Nathanson
Director: Curtis Hanson
Screenplay: Brian Helgeland and Curtis Hanson, based on the novel by James Ellroy
Cinematography: Dante Spinotti
Score: Jerry Goldsmith
Editing: Peter Honess Art Direction: Jeannine Oppewall and Jay R. Hart
Costumes: Ruth Myers
Cast: Guy Pearce (Ed Exley), Russell Crowe (Bud White), Kim Basinger (Lynn Bracken), Kevin Spacey (Jack Vincennes), Danny DeVito (Sid Hudgens), James Cromwell (Dudley Smith), David Strathairn (Pierce Patchett), Amber Smith (Susan Lefferts), Paolo Seganti (Johnny Stompanato), Paul Guilfoyle (Mickey Cohen), Graham Beckel (Dick Stensland).
C-138m. Letterboxed.

by James Steffen
L.a. Confidential

L.A. Confidential

Synopsis: Beneath the illusion of glamour, Los Angeles of the early 1950s is a corrupt and dangerous place. The Los Angeles Police Department sees--and sometimes participates in--the very worst of it. Some of the characters we encounter: Dudley Smith, the shrewd and streetwise Captain of the L.A.P.D. Ed Exley, the ambitious, clean-nosed and widely despised son of a legendary cop. Bud White, a specialist in domestic abuse cases who is prone to violence himself. Jack Vincennes, the slick consultant for Badge of Honor, a popular police show. Sid Hudgens, the editor for the tabloid publication Hush-Hush. And Lynn Bracken, a ringer for Veronica Lake. When a shooting rampage occurs at a cafe, the investigation leads in all sorts of directions, including the owner of a high-class prostitution ring and possibly someone in the police force itself. One of the most highly acclaimed dramas of the 1990s, Curtis Hanson's L.A. Confidential (1997) is based on the 1990 novel of the same title by James Ellroy, arguably the leading crime writer today. Ellroy, who was born and raised in Los Angeles, has made the city his special turf, perhaps most spectacularly in the "L.A. Quartet" that includes The Black Dahlia (1987), The Big Nowhere (1988), White Jazz (1992) and this work. As his 1996 memoir My Dark Places details, crime has played a major role in his own life--his mother was murdered when he was ten years old and he spent much of his adolescence and early adult life in trouble with the law. His fiction is distinguished by a terse, punchy prose style that is invariably described as "staccato" and minutely detailed accounts of criminal investigations and police procedures. One of his most interesting earlier novels, The Black Dahlia, is a fictionalized attempt to crack the notorious 1947 murder case that remains officially unsolved to this day. In L.A. Confidential, Ellroy once again uses facts as his starting point, cleverly weaving in real-life people such as the crime boss Meyer Harris "Mickey" Cohen and Lana Turner's boyfriend Johnny Stompanato (who was later stabbed to death by her daughter, Cheryl Crane), locations such as the Frolic Room and the Formosa Café, and events such as Robert Mitchum's pot bust and the "Bloody Christmas" police abuse case. At first glance, the source novel would seem difficult to adapt successfully for the screen. It has an exceedingly complex plot, dense with incident and intricate connections between the characters. Ellroy's legendary telegraphic style takes us directly inside the heads of his characters, who more often than not think the most unsavory thoughts; his prose is littered with arcane slang and racial epithets. Ellroy also introduces articles from the tabloid Hush-Hush and various newspapers, as well as police reports. This gives the reader a fragmented but multi-layered perspective on events. For the film, co-screenwriters Brian Helgeland and Curtis Hanson pared down and radically reshaped the plot to focus on the dynamics between the main characters. So while the film still has a complicated plot and an exceptionally large number of speaking parts (about eighty), it is more of a well-constructed film narrative in the usual sense. The screenwriters also use voice-over narration by Sid Hudgens (Danny DeVito), editor of Hush-Hush, to help create a unified tone and retain some of the pulpy flavor of Ellroy's style. In interviews, Ellroy has expressed great satisfaction with how the novel was adapted, and Helgeland and Hanson won an Academy Award for Best Adapted Screenplay. Although L.A. Confidential has its share of nighttime scenes and shadows, Dante Spinotti as cinematographer wisely avoids excessive chiaroscuro effects, instead trying to create a realistic atmosphere. His chief source of visual inspiration was the work of Swiss-born photographer Robert Frank, whose 1958 book The Americans offered realistic, at times gritty images from a wide range of American society at that time. In an interview published in the October 1997 issue of American Cinematographer, Spinotti says: "I tried to compose shots as if I were using a still camera. I was constantly asking myself, 'Where would I be if I were holding a Leica?' This is one reason I suggested shooting in the Super 35 widescreen format; I wanted to use spherical lenses, which for me have a look and feel similar to still-photo work." He also took Frank's lead in using "practical" lights such as desk lamps as primary lighting sources, often incorporating them into the composition. While this occasionally results in "burn-outs" and halos around the lights, Spinotti embraced these effects as "enhancing the period and mood." When L.A. Confidential was released it received the best reviews of Curtis Hanson's career. Kenneth Turan of the Los Angeles Times wrote that it "looks to be the definitive noir for this particular time and place," praising Hanson's "command of narrative drive," the film's ensemble acting, and its attention to period detail. Janet Maslin of the New York Times described it as a "vastly entertaining throwback to the Hollywood that did things right." Among its many awards and nominations--too many to list fully here--included Academy Award nominations for Best Picture, Director, Supporting Actress (Kim Basinger), Adapted Screenplay, Cinematography, Dramatic Score, Art Direction, Editing, and Sound. Ultimately only Kim Basinger and the co-screenwriters took home Oscars®, though one can't help but feel that it would have won more awards if it weren't competing with the Titanic juggernaut that year. Executive Producers: David L. Wolper and Dan Kolsrud Producers: Arnon Milchan and Michael Nathanson Director: Curtis Hanson Screenplay: Brian Helgeland and Curtis Hanson, based on the novel by James Ellroy Cinematography: Dante Spinotti Score: Jerry Goldsmith Editing: Peter Honess Art Direction: Jeannine Oppewall and Jay R. Hart Costumes: Ruth Myers Cast: Guy Pearce (Ed Exley), Russell Crowe (Bud White), Kim Basinger (Lynn Bracken), Kevin Spacey (Jack Vincennes), Danny DeVito (Sid Hudgens), James Cromwell (Dudley Smith), David Strathairn (Pierce Patchett), Amber Smith (Susan Lefferts), Paolo Seganti (Johnny Stompanato), Paul Guilfoyle (Mickey Cohen), Graham Beckel (Dick Stensland). C-138m. Letterboxed. by James Steffen

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Dante Spinotti was nominated in the feature film category for the 1997 Outstanding Achievement Awards sponsored by the American Society of Cinematographers.

Nominated for a 1997 Eddie Award for best editing in a motion picture by the American Cinema Editors (ACE).

Nominated for Outstanding Directorial Achievement in 1997 by the Directors Guild of America.

Winner of four 1997 awards, including Best Film, Best Director, Best Screenplay and Best Actor (Kevin Spacey) from the Boston Society of Film Critics.

Winner of four 1997 awards, including Best Picture, Best Director, Best Screenplay, and Best Cinematography from the Los Angeles Film Critics Association.

Winner of the 1997 award for Best Screenplay Based on Material Previously Produced or Published by the Writers Guild of America (WGA).

Winner of three 1997 awards, including Best Picture, Best Director and Best Screenplay from the Chicago Film Critics Association.

Winner of three 1997 awards, including Best Picture, Best Director, and Best Screenplay from the New York Film Critics Circle.

Winner of two 1997 awards, including Best Picture and Best Director from the National Board of Review.

Released in United States Fall September 19, 1997

Released in United States on Video April 14, 1998

Released in United States September 1997

Shown at San Sebastian Film Festival in Spain September 18-27, 1997.

Began shooting May 6, 1996.

Completed shooting August 22, 1996.

Released in United States Fall September 19, 1997

Released in United States on Video April 14, 1998

Released in United States September 1997 (Shown at San Sebastian Film Festival in Spain September 18-27, 1997.)

Co-winner of the Metro Media Award (with "Boogie Nights") at the 1997 Toronto International Film Festival.