Lorenz Hart


Lyricist

About

Also Known As
Lorenz Milton Hart
Birth Place
New York City, New York, USA
Born
May 02, 1895
Died
November 22, 1943
Cause of Death
Complications From Pneumonia

Biography

Music aficionados are generally divided into two camps when discussing the work of composer Richard Rodgers. There are those who feel his best work was written in collaboration with Oscar Hammerstein II, especially as the pair are credited with re-inventing and re-structuring the musical comedy form from the early 1940s through the 1950s. Then, there are the partisans of Rodgers' work wi...

Bibliography

"Lorenz Hart: A Poet on Broadway"
Frederick Nolan, Oxford University Press (1994)
"The Lyrics of Lorenz Hart"
Dorthy Hart and Robert Kimball (editors), Alfred A. Knopf (1986)
"Rodgers and Hart: Bewitched, Bothered and Bedeviled"
Samuel Marx and Jan Clayton, G.P. Putnam's Sons (1976)
"Thou Swell, Thou Witty: The Life and Lyrics of Lorenz Hart"
Dorothy Hart, Harper & Row (1976)

Notes

"Unfortunately, I never knew Larry Hart--I never met him--but when I I was growing up, I became aware of the tremendous impact of this man on lyric writing. A lot of people thought he overrhymed. I don't think he did. I think he invented some of the most fantastic new rhymes I have ever heard. The psychology of analyzing this man in his lyrics convinces me he was the minstrel of masochism.Part of it is that in the twenties and thirties it was not what it is today, which is the Age of the Uglies ... Larry was a little gnome and consequently he thought--and this is just a theory--but certainly in all his work was 'I hate me.' It was 'beat me.' It was 'I'm no good.' ... These were the theme songs of this man's life. ... Every lyric has some masochism, every single one." --Jerome Lawrence quoted in "Rodgers and Hart: Bewitched, Bothered and Bedeviled" by Samuel Marx and Jan Clayton (New York: G.P. Putnam's Sons, 1976).

Biography

Music aficionados are generally divided into two camps when discussing the work of composer Richard Rodgers. There are those who feel his best work was written in collaboration with Oscar Hammerstein II, especially as the pair are credited with re-inventing and re-structuring the musical comedy form from the early 1940s through the 1950s. Then, there are the partisans of Rodgers' work with lyricist Lorenz Hart, a partnership that yielded songs noted more for their emotional content than for psychological depth.

Like many of the great composers and lyricists of the early part of the 20th Century, Lorenz Milton Hart was the child of immigrants. He was born on May 2, 1895, the second son (and first to survive infancy) of German-born parents. While at summer camp, he began his show business career as an actor, appearing in productions at the Weingart Institute in the Catskills. The earliest extant verse written by Hart is a poem commemorating his parents' twenty-fifth wedding anniversary in 1911. While attending Columbia Grammar School and later Columbia University, Hart met and was befriended by future songwriters like Herbert Fields and Arthur Schwartz. In 1916, he began his lyric career in earnest, translating German songs into English. He went on to contribute lyrics to Columbia's 1919 varsity show and to camp songs written in tandem with Schwartz. That same year, he and a teenaged Richard Rodgers wrote their first song together, "Any Old Place With You," featured in the Broadway show "A Lonely Romeo."

With their partnership off and running, the pair set to work on their first score for "Poor Little Ritz Girl." During the show's try-out in Boston, however, the producers substantially revised the show and by the time it reached Broadway, most of the Rodgers and Hart songs had been dropped and the score was supplemented with work by Sigmund Romberg and Alex Gerber. It would be another five years before the duo had their first hit, "Manhattan," which was featured in "The Garrick Gaieties." For the remainder of the decade, the prolific team produced scores for at least two shows (and sometimes as many as four) each year. The 1926 edition of "The Garrick Gaieties" yielded "Mountain Greenery." Other shows were generally of the period, with sketchy plots upon which the score was hung. Some (like "Betsy") folded quickly; others (i.e., "A Connecticut Yankee") were hits that ran for hundreds of performances.

It was only a matter of time before Hollywood would beckon and Rodgers and Hart were hired to contribute songs to the feature adaptation of "Follow Thru" (1930), a vehicle for Charles Rogers, Nancy Carroll and Jack Haley. When the final film was released, only one of the four Rodgers and Hart songs, "I'm Hard to Find," was included. Ironically, the film opened in NYC and L.A. the same week as "Leathernecking" (also 1930), the uneven screen version of their Broadway hit "Present Arms." First National hired the songwriters for three films, but after the first, "The Hot Heiress" (1931), tanked at the box office, the contract was nullified. Rodgers and Hart then moved to Paramount to provide the songs for the superb "Love Me Tonight" (1932). Directed by Rouben Mamoulian and teaming Maurice Chevalier and Jeanette MacDonald as a tailor and a princess, respectively, it is considered by many critics as one of the best movie musicals ever made, a pure integration of music and story. The score includes the now classic "Isn't It Romantic?" and "Mimi" and marked the apotheosis of their Hollywood experience. They even appeared briefly in the film, with Rodgers as a photographer and Hart as a banker with the single line, "No!."

Many of the subsequent films to which Rodgers and Hart contributed songs were star vehicles of varying quality. Al Jolson headlined "Hallelujah, I'm a Bum!" (1933), noted more for S N Berman's script written in rhyming couplet than for the score (although the title song garnered some notice). "The Phantom President" (1933), a political satire with George M Cohan, featured what most feel is sub-standard work by the writing team. (In fact, Cohan proved to be a difficult presence on the set and hardly inspired Rodgers and Hart to their best efforts, although they later wrote the 1937 stage show "I'd Rather Be Right" which featured Cohan as Franklin D Roosevelt.) "Evergreen" (1935), however, had Jessie Matthews in a dual role as a stage star and her daughter and strong songs by Rodgers and Hart, especially "Dancing on the Ceiling." Bing Crosby headed the cast of "Mississippi" (1935), which lacked a full score but included hits like "Down by the River" and "Easy to Remember but So Hard to Forget." By the time of the Carole Lombard misfire "Fools for Scandal" (1938), Rodgers and Hart had grown weary of films. They only worked on one later picture, the lackluster "They Met in Argentina" (1941).

Returning to the NYC stage in the mid-30s, Rodgers and Hart had the first of a string of hits with the Billy Rose-produced "Jumbo" (1935), starring Jimmy Durante and including the lilting ballad "My Romance" and the popular "The Most Beautiful Girl in the World." Within two years, they had two more hits, "On Your Toes" (1936), notable for its "Slaughter on Tenth Avenue" ballet choreographed by George Ballanchine, and "Babes in Arms" (1937), which includes such standards as "Where or When" and "The Lady Is a Tramp." "The Boys From Syracuse" (1938) with a book by George Abbott, turned Shakespeare's "The Comedy of Errors" into a jaunty musical comedy, featured Hart's brother Teddy in a leading role and introduced "Falling in Love With Love."

By the 40s, however, Rodgers was wearying of Hart's growing alcoholism. "Pal Joey" (1940) proved to be a great success and provided Gene Kelly with a star-making turn in the title role (although Frank Sinatra landed the role in the 1957 feature). "By Jupiter" (1942) turned mythological figures into fodder for musical comedy. Among the songs in its score was the ironically titled "Nobody's Heart," which also reflected the lyricist's frustration in his own personal life ("Nobody writes his songs to me/no one belongs to me.") The final collaboration between Rodgers and Hart was a revival of "A Connecticut Yankee" (1943) for which they wrote what is considered their final song, "To Keep My Love Alive." Rodgers had offered Hart the opportunity to collaborate on "Green Grows the Lilacs" (later "Oklahoma!") but Hart was not physically or emotionally up to it. Rodgers began his partnership with Oscar Hammerstein II and shortly after the opening of "Oklahoma!," Hart was hospitalized and succumbed to complications from pneumonia.

Theater music generally works on at least two levels. Hart's songs, like most Broadway music written in the first half of the 20th century, especially, were meant to serve plot functions, exploring an emotion or commenting on the show's actions. They were also written to transcend the theater and move into the realm of popular music which audiences could play or listen to at home. Hart's lyrics, however, also function on another level and mirror his own concerns. Suffering from a form of dwarfism, Hart was short, with a head that seemed too large for his body. Openly homosexual, he also lived through the period of repression that coincided with Prohibition. Hart was never able to find a lover and many of the lyrics of his songs deal with unrequited love or with romantic fantasy figures. In "My Funny Valentine," Hart's lyrics are hardly complimentary ("Your looks are laughable, unphotographable") but they are overlooked by the singer ("Don't change a hair for me/Not if you care for me"). At other times, there is regret ("I Wish I Were in Love Again") or confusion ("This Can't Be Love"). Even one Rodgers and Hart song standard not featured in a musical, "Blue Moon," is addressed to a fantasy: "You heard me saying a prayer for/somebody I really could care for/And then there suddenly appeared before me,/the only one my arms will ever hold." Hart, however, was never able to fully marry his ideals with reality. Instead, he sought out refuge in parties and alcohol, with the latter a contributing factor in his untimely death at age 47. He was portrayed by Mickey Rooney in the highly sanitized 1948 biopic "Words and Music."

Filmography

 

Writer (Feature Film)

The Merry Widow (1934)
Contract Writer

Music (Feature Film)

The Good Liar (2019)
Song
The Children Act (2018)
Music Lyrics
Can You Ever Forgive Me? (2018)
Song
1:30 Train (2015)
Song
Bridge of Spies (2015)
Song
Born to Be Blue (2015)
Song
And So It Goes (2014)
Song
Fading Gigolo (2014)
Song
Harry Dean Stanton: Partly Fiction (2013)
Song
American Hustle (2013)
Song
Kill Your Darlings (2013)
Song
The Last Stand (2013)
Song
The Campaign (2012)
Song
Jack Goes Boating (2010)
Song
Sex and the City 2 (2010)
Song
A Single Man (2009)
Song
Me and Orson Welles (2009)
Song
The Answer Man (2009)
Song
Youth in Revolt (2009)
Song
Speed Racer (2008)
Song
Perfect Stranger (2007)
Song
Happy Feet (2006)
Composer
The History Boys (2006)
Song
Last Holiday (2006)
Song
The Bad News Bears (2005)
Song
Mona Lisa Smile (2003)
Song
It Runs in the Family (2003)
Song ("Where Or When")
How To Lose a Guy in 10 Days (2003)
Song
God is Great, I'm Not (2002)
Song ("I Didn'T Know What Time It Was")
The Adventures of Pluto Nash (2002)
Song
Amelie (2001)
Song ("With A Song In My Heart")
Domestic Disturbance (2001)
Song
Kissing Jessica Stein (2001)
Song
Wonder Boys (2000)
Composer
Small Time Crooks (2000)
Song
U-571 (2000)
Song
Duets (2000)
Song
Return to Me (2000)
Song
At First Sight (1999)
Song
The Talented Mr. Ripley (1999)
Song
Superstar (1999)
Song
The Out of Towners (1999)
Song
Runaway Bride (1999)
Song
Notting Hill (1999)
Song
Meet Joe Black (1998)
Song
Rodgers & Hammerstein's Cinderella (1997)
Theme Lyrics
Dante's Peak (1997)
Song
Selena (1997)
Song
That Old Feeling (1997)
Song
Love! Valour! Compassion! (1997)
Song ("Bewitched, Bothered And Bewildered")
L.A. Confidential (1997)
Song ("The Lady Is A Tramp")
Deconstructing Harry (1997)
Song
Everyone Says I Love You (1996)
Song
The English Patient (1996)
Words And Music ("Where Or When")
One Fine Day (1996)
Song
The Evening Star (1996)
Song
The Neon Bible (1995)
Song Composer ("My Romance")
Beverly Hills Cop III (1994)
Song
When a Man Loves a Woman (1994)
Song
That's Entertainment! III (1994)
Theme Lyrics
The Remains Of The Day (1993)
Music Composer
Flesh and Bone (1993)
Song
Malice (1993)
Song
In the Line of Fire (1993)
Song
Manhattan Murder Mystery (1993)
Song
School Ties (1992)
Song
Rich in Love (1992)
Song ("Blue Moon")
Father of the Bride (1991)
Song
Dead Again (1991)
Song
Billy Bathgate (1991)
Song
True Colors (1991)
Song
Stepping Out (1991)
Song
Late for Dinner (1991)
Song
Where the Heart Is (1990)
Song
Funny About Love (1990)
Song
Joe Versus the Volcano (1990)
Song
The Fabulous Baker Boys (1989)
Song
Crimes And Misdemeanors (1989)
Song
Cousins (1989)
Song ("Isn'T It Romantic?")
When Harry Met Sally... (1989)
Song
Gross Anatomy (1989)
Song
Bert Rigby, You're a Fool (1989)
Song
Catch Me If You Can (1989)
Song
Great Balls Of Fire (1989)
Song
Let's Get Lost (1988)
Song
Working Girl (1988)
Song
Biloxi Blues (1988)
Song
Surrender (1987)
Theme Lyrics
Broken Noses (1987)
Song
Heartburn (1986)
Song
Haunted Honeymoon (1986)
Song
Children Of A Lesser God (1986)
Song
Hannah and Her Sisters (1986)
Song
D.A.R.Y.L. (1985)
Theme Lyrics
Real Genius (1985)
Song
Desert Hearts (1985)
Song ("Blue Moon")
Terms Of Endearment (1983)
Music
Tempest (1982)
Theme Lyrics
Diner (1982)
Theme Lyrics
An American Werewolf in London (1981)
Theme Lyrics
Four Friends (1981)
Song ("Blue Moon")
Paternity (1981)
Song
Sharky's Machine (1981)
Song
The Dollar Bottom (1981)
Song
Mommie Dearest (1981)
Theme Lyrics
Joe Albany... A Jazz Life (1980)
Song
Players (1979)
Song
Valentine (1979)
Theme Lyrics
Grease (1978)
Song ("Blue Moon")
Alice Doesn't Live Here Any More (1974)
Song
Dusty and Sweets McGee (1971)
Composer
Going Home (1971)
Composer
The Swinger (1966)
Composer
Jumbo (1962)
Composer
Pepe (1961)
Composer
Night of the Quarter Moon (1959)
Composer
Beau James (1957)
Composer
The Helen Morgan Story (1957)
Composer
Pal Joey (1957)
Composer
Gaby (1956)
Composer
The Eddy Duchin Story (1956)
Composer
Love Me or Leave Me (1955)
Composer
Gentlemen Marry Brunettes (1955)
Composer
Sabrina (1954)
Composer
A Star Is Born (1954)
Composer
The Jazz Singer (1953)
Composer
Don't Bother to Knock (1952)
Composer
With a Song in My Heart (1952)
Composer
Two Tickets to Broadway (1951)
Composer
Painting the Clouds with Sunshine (1951)
Composer
Tea for Two (1950)
Composer
Young Man with a Horn (1950)
Composer
Love That Brute (1950)
Composer
Malaya (1949)
Composer
Words and Music (1948)
Composer
Isn't It Romantic (1948)
Composer
Because of Him (1946)
Composer
Ten Cents a Dance (1945)
Composer
Meet the People (1944)
Composer
This Is the Life (1944)
Composer
Higher and Higher (1943)
Composer
Moonlight in Vermont (1943)
Composer
Stage Door Canteen (1943)
Composer
This Was Paris (1942)
Composer
I Married an Angel (1942)
Composer
The Palm Beach Story (1942)
Composer
Yankee Doodle Dandy (1942)
Composer
They Met in Argentina (1941)
Composer
Too Many Girls (1940)
Composer
The Boys from Syracuse (1940)
Composer
Babes in Arms (1939)
Composer
Fools for Scandal (1938)
Composer
Dancing Pirate (1936)
Composer
Mississippi (1935)
Composer
Manhattan Melodrama (1934)
Composer
The Merry Widow (1934)
Composer
Nana (1934)
Composer
Hollywood Party (1934)
Composer
Evergreen (1934)
Composer
Hallelujah I'm a Bum (1933)
Music dial by
Hallelujah I'm a Bum (1933)
Composer
Dancing Lady (1933)
Composer
Love Me Tonight (1932)
Composer
The Phantom President (1932)
Composer
The Hot Heiress (1931)
Composer
Ten Cents a Dance (1931)
Composer
Heads Up (1930)
Composer
Spring Is Here (1930)
Composer

Misc. Crew (Feature Film)

The English Patient (1996)
Other

Music (Special)

The Rodgers & Hart Story: Thou Swell, Thou Witty (1999)
Theme Lyrics
A Grand Night For Singing - Public Television's Gift to You (1996)
Music
TIBOR RUDAS PRESENTS CARRERAS, DOMINGO, PAVAROTTI WITH MEHTA: THE THREE TENORS IN CONCERT (1994)
Theme Lyrics
Michael Feinstein & Friends (1991)
Song
Harry Connick, Jr. & His Orchestra: Swinging Out With Harry (1990)
Song
Jacksonville Jazz IX (1989)
Theme Lyrics
Keith Jarrett: Standards (1988)
Music ("It'S Easy To Remember")
A Tribute to American Music: Rodgers and Hart (1987)
Songs
Sylvia Fine Kaye's Musical Comedy Tonight III (The Spark and the Glue) (1985)
Theme Lyrics
A Connecticut Yankee (1955)
Lyrics

Cast (Short)

An Intimate Dinner in Celebration of Warner Bros. Silver Jubilee (1930)
Himself

Music (Short)

Hollywood Party (1937)
Music Lyrics
Yours Sincerely (1933)
Music Lyrics

Music (TV Mini-Series)

I'll Take Manhattan (1987)
Song

Life Events

1908

Made first stage appearances as actor at Weingart Institute, a summer camp in the Catskills

1911

Earliest surving verse, a poem written in honor of his parents twenty-fith wedding anniversary

1912

Made first visit to Europe

1916

Wrote first lyrics for a show; adapted German songs into English for Gustave Amberg

1917

Met Richard Rodgers (date approximate)

1919

Collaborated with Arthur Schwartz; wrote camp songs

1919

Contributed to first Columbia University varsity show

1919

Wrote first song with Rodgers, "Any Old Place With You"; performed in Broadway show "A Lonely Romeo"

1920

First professional show, "Poor Little Ritz Girl"; show opened in Boston but was substantially revised before it moved to Broadway; Rodgers and Hart's score was supplemented by works by Sigmund Romberg and Alex Gerber

1925

With Rodgers, co-wrote score for the "Garrick Gaieties"; had first hit song "Manhattan"

1927

Had big success with stage musical "A Connecticut Yankee"

1929

Contributed four songs to the feature "Follow Thru" (1930), only one, "I'm Hard to Find", used in final film

1930

First feature film adaptation of a Rodgers and Hart show, "Leathernecking" (based on "Present Arms")

1932

Hired by Paramount to score "Love Me Tonight", starring Maurice Chevalier and Jeanette MacDonald

1933

Worked with Moss Hart on unproduced musical film "I Married an Angel"

1933

Moved to United Artists to score "Hallelujah, I'm a Bum!"

1933

Wrote songs for second Paramount feature, "The Phantom President", starring George M Cohan

1935

Had Broadway success with score for Billy Rose's "Jumbo", starring Jimmy Durante

1938

"The Boys From Syracuse" opened

1938

Stage version of "I Married an Angel" premiered

1941

Final feature score, "They Met in Argentina"

1943

Last feature work, contributed song "The Girl I Love to Leave Behind" to "Stage Door Canteen"

1943

Final collaboration with Rodgers, oversaw Broadway revival of "A Connecticut Yankee"; wrote new songs including "To Keep My Love Alive", which is believed to be their last completed collaboration

Photo Collections

Words and Music - Scene Stills - "The Slaughter on 10th Avenue"
Here are a number of scene stills from MGM's Words and Music (1948), featuring Gene Kelly and Vera-Ellen in "The Slaughter on 10th Avenue" sequence.

Videos

Movie Clip

Alice Doesn't Live Here Anymore (1974) - Where Or When Alice (Ellen Burtsyn) brings Jacobs (Murray Moston) into a Phoenix bar in hopes of getting hired in his competing bar as a singer, her audition medley beginning with Rodgers and Hart's Where Or When, camera by Kent Wakeford, in Martin Scorsese's Alice Doesn't Live Here Anymore, 1974.
Pal Joey (1957) - Vanessa The Undresser Kim Novak standing by to model fashion, Frank Sinatra the title character, Bobby Sherwood his pal at the piano, all invited from the club to a San Francisco society gig hosted by Rita Hayworth as Vera, in her first scene, some recalling her past, with another Rodgers and Hart tune, this one not from the Broadway musical, in Pal Joey, 1957.
Pal Joey (1957) - Open, Here's Your Ticket Director George Sidney’s opening, shot at the Berkeley, California train station, introduces Frank Sinatra (title character) followed by the first of many San Francisco location scenes, in Pal Joey, 1957, also starring Rita Hayworth and Kim Novak, from the Rodgers & Hart musical.
Higher And Higher (1943) - Disgustingly Rich Jack Haley leads the staff in a song from the Rodgers and Hart Broadway show, about the plan to launch maid Michele Morgan as a debutante, with Mary Wickes, young Mel Tormè, Marcy McGuire, Paul Hartman, Grace Hartman, Ivy Scott, Leon Errol, early in Higher And Higher, 1943.
Merry Widow, The (1934) - Vilia First proper number for the wealthy, reclusive widow Sonia (Jeanette MacDonald), witty staging from director Ernst Lubitsch, Danilo (Maurice Chevalier) among the onlookers, the song by Franz Lehar and Lorenz Hart, in MGM's The Merry Widow, 1934.
Merry Widow, The (1934) - Girls! Girls! Girls! Maurice Chevalier as "Danilo" with the opening number by Franz Lehar and Lorenz Hart, Jeanette MacDonald slipping in as the mysterious widow, from Ernst Lubitsch's celebrated 1934 version of The Merry Widow.
Evergreen (1934) - Dancing On The Ceiling In her London Art Deco flat, British superstar Jessie Matthews as West End theater star “Harriet” (part of a complicated story in which she’s claiming to be her own mother) with a Rodgers and Hart tune from the original stage production, in Evergreen, 1934, from British-Gaumont studios.
Hallelujah I'm A Bum (1933) - P.S. 44 Dist. 11 The mayor (Frank Morgan) lays a groundstone, musical dialogue by Rodgers and Hart, fancy editing by W. Duncan Mansfield, Richard Rodgers' cameo assisting the photographer, in Lewis Milestone's Hallelujah I'm A Bum, 1933.
Hallelujah I'm A Bum (1933) - I'm A Bum Again More Rodgers and Hart song as Bumper (Al Jolson) is relieved he's no longer rich, not realizing he's about to meet disconsolate June (Madge Evans), in Lewis Milestone's Hallelujah I'm A Bum, 1933.
Hallelujah I'm A Bum (1933) - Drop That Goose! Youthful John Carradine in this opening scene from the Al Jolson vehicle Hallelujah I'm A Bum, 1933, in which Al (as "Bumper") and pal Sunday (Chester Conklin) meet the mayor (Frank Morgan), wintering in Florida.
Hallelujah I'm A Bum (1933) - Hoover's Cossacks! Songs and musical dialogue by Rodgers and Hart as Bumper (Al Jolson) and Egghead (Harry Langdon) perform a highly political discourse in director Lewis Milestone's Hallelujah I'm A Bum, 1933.
Meet The People (1944) - I Like To Recognize The Tune June Allyson is the fan-clubber meekly complaining to Vaughn Monroe that his band is drowning out the melody, so she joins him, Ziggie Talent and Virginia O'Brien in this Rodgers and Hart tune first introduced on Broadway in 1939, at a shipboard fund-raiser in MGM's Meet The People, 1944.

Trailer

Gaby - (Original Trailer) Gaby (1956), Waterloo Bridge in color and widescreen with Leslie Caron as the woman left behind in World War II.
Words And Music - (Original Trailer) Judy Garland, Lena Horne and Perry Como perform the songs of Rodgers and Hart in Words And Music (1948).
This Was Paris - (Original Trailer) On the eve of the Nazi occupation, spies in Paris try to outguess each other in This Was Paris (1942).
Dancing Lady - (Re-issue Trailer) Joan Crawford loves Clark Gable but sings and dances with Fred Astaire in Dancing Lady (1933) with a guest appearance by the Three Stooges.
Merry Widow, The (1934) - (Re-issue Trailer) A prince (Maurice Chevalier) from a small kingdom courts a wealthy widow to keep her money in the country in Ernst Lubitsch's The Merry Widow (1934).
Too Many Girls -- (Re-issue Trailer) The re-issue trailer for Too Many Girls, 1940, the Rodgers & Hart musical adapted from Broadway on which Lucille Ball met Desi Arnaz.
Sabrina (1954) - (Original Trailer) When a wealthy playboy falls in love with his chauffeur's daughter (Audrey Hepburn) his staid older brother pretends to pursue her himself in Sabrina (1954).
Hot Heiress, The - (Original Trailer) When a society woman falls for a riveter, she tries to pass him off as an architect in the Rodgers and Hart musical The Hot Heiress (1931).
Fools For Scandal - (Original Trailer) Carole Lombard is a Hollywood star whom a broke aristocrat tries to blackmail into marriage in Fools For Scandal (1938).
Billy Rose's Jumbo - (Original Trailer) The daughter of a circus owner fights to save her father from a takeover spearheaded by the man she loves in Billy Rose's Jumbo (1962) starring Doris Day, Jimmy Durante and Martha Raye.
Love Me Tonight - (Original Trailer) Parisian tailor Maurice Chevalier falls in love with princess Jeanette MacDonald in the musical Love Me Tonight (1932).

Family

Max Meyer Hertz
Father
Held various jobs; emigrated to America from Hamburg in 1878 at age 12; Anglicized surname to Hart; married Hart's mother on November 6, 1886; died October 9, 1928.
Frieda Hertz
Mother
German; died April 23, 1943.
James Hart
Brother
Born 1892; died in infancy.
Theodore van Wyck Hart
Brother
Actor. Married to the former Dorothy Lubow; had son named Lorenz.

Bibliography

"Lorenz Hart: A Poet on Broadway"
Frederick Nolan, Oxford University Press (1994)
"The Lyrics of Lorenz Hart"
Dorthy Hart and Robert Kimball (editors), Alfred A. Knopf (1986)
"Rodgers and Hart: Bewitched, Bothered and Bedeviled"
Samuel Marx and Jan Clayton, G.P. Putnam's Sons (1976)
"Thou Swell, Thou Witty: The Life and Lyrics of Lorenz Hart"
Dorothy Hart, Harper & Row (1976)

Notes

"Unfortunately, I never knew Larry Hart--I never met him--but when I I was growing up, I became aware of the tremendous impact of this man on lyric writing. A lot of people thought he overrhymed. I don't think he did. I think he invented some of the most fantastic new rhymes I have ever heard. The psychology of analyzing this man in his lyrics convinces me he was the minstrel of masochism.Part of it is that in the twenties and thirties it was not what it is today, which is the Age of the Uglies ... Larry was a little gnome and consequently he thought--and this is just a theory--but certainly in all his work was 'I hate me.' It was 'beat me.' It was 'I'm no good.' ... These were the theme songs of this man's life. ... Every lyric has some masochism, every single one." --Jerome Lawrence quoted in "Rodgers and Hart: Bewitched, Bothered and Bedeviled" by Samuel Marx and Jan Clayton (New York: G.P. Putnam's Sons, 1976).