A League of Their Own


2h 8m 1992
A League of Their Own

Brief Synopsis

Two sisters become rivals while playing women's baseball during World War II.

Film Details

Also Known As
League of Their Own, Tjejligan, Une équipe hors du commun, équipe hors du commun
MPAA Rating
Genre
Comedy
Drama
Sports
Period
Release Date
1992
Production Company
C Douglas Cameron
Distribution Company
Sony Pictures Releasing
Location
Cooperstown, New York, USA; Chicago, Illinois, USA; Henderson, Kentucky, USA; Evansville, Indiana, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
2h 8m

Synopsis

Story of the formation of the first professional female baseball league, during World War II.

Crew

Elliot Abbott

Producer

Jerry Abbott

Song

Michael Adkins

Wardrobe

Alexis Alexanian

Production Coordinator

David Allen

Assistant Property Master

Tom Allen

Property Master

Danny Anglin

Transportation Captain

Harold Arlen

Song

Lissa August

Special Thanks To

Mary Bailey

Script Supervisor

Alan Balsam

Editor

Bobbi Banks

Adr Editor

Lisa A Beasley

Extras Agent/Coordinator

Laura Behary

Assistant Editor

Dennis Benatar

Location Manager

Pamela Bentkowski

Foley Editor

Beth Bergeron

Adr Editor

Adam Bernardi

Editor

Ted Bessell

Special Thanks To

Jamie Boscardin-martin

Other

Timothy M. Bourne

Unit Production Manager

George Bowers

Editor

Jane Brody

Location Casting

Bill Brooks

Special Thanks To

Ray Bulinski

Craft Service

C Douglas Cameron

Cable Operator

Joseph A Campayno

Makeup Artist

Kelly Candaele

Story By

Kelly Candaele

From Story

Hoagy Carmichael

Song

Madonna Louise Ciccone (madonna)

Song

Madonna Louise Ciccone (madonna)

Song Performer

Jane Clarke

Storyboard Artist

Ronnie Clemmer

Coproducer

George M. Cohan

Song

Harold F Collins

Construction Coordinator

Bobby Conners

Lighting Technician

Ken Conners

Lighting

Anthony Cortino

Hair Stylist

Melissa Crowe

Assistant

D Kelly Cummins

Property Master

Denver Darling

Song

Rod Dedeaux

Advisor

George Detitta Jr.

Set Decorator

Craig Dibona

Camera Operator

Kim Druce

Assistant Costume Designer

Dennis Drummond

Sound Editor

David Dumais

Wardrobe

Edwin A Effrein

Assistant Camera Operator

Duke Ellington

Song

Irene Ferrari

Wardrobe

Dorothy Fields

Song

Alison Fisher

Dialogue Editor

Carmen Flores De Tanis

Adr

Cynthia Flynt

Costume Designer

Sukey Fontelieu

Foley Editor

Ken Fundus

Dolly Grip

Milt Gabler

Song

Timothy Galvin

Art Director

Lowell Ganz

Screenplay

Art Garfunkel

Song Performer

Paul Gebbia

Makeup Artist

Louis Goldman

Photography

James W Greenhut

Assistant Director

Jennifer Greenhut

Production Assistant

Robert Greenhut

Producer

Wayne Griffin

Sound Editor

Don Grolnick

Song

Bill Groom

Production Designer

Rudy Guess

Song

Ted Haigh

Graphic Designer

Michael Haley

Assistant Director

Penny Lee Hallin

Apprentice

Wendy S Hallin

Production Assistant

E. Y. Harburg

Song

Kimberly Harris

Adr Editor

Joseph R Hartwick

Coproducer

Tim Hauser

Song

Robert Heffernan

Adr Editor

Paul Herold

Special Thanks To

Bonnie Hlinomaz

Assistant

Kim S Hobbs

Assistant Set Decorator

Sam Hoffman

Assistant Director

Vaughn Horton

Song

Robert Huberman

Assistant Director

William E Hughes

Advisor

Adam Jenkins

Rerecording

Chris Jenkins

Rerecording

Amanda A Jobe

Extras Casting Assistant

Bill Joel

Song

Bill Joel

Song Performer

Ingrid Johanson

Production Coordinator

Isham Jones

Song

Gus Kahn

Song

Uri Katoni

Assistant Editor

Billy Kerwick

Dolly Grip

Carole King

Song

Carole King

Song Performer

George Kohut

Camera Operator

Karen S Kunkel

Technical Advisor

Emanuel Kurtz

Song

Jay Landers

Song

Ted E Larkowski

Transportation Co-Captain

Les Lazarowitz

Sound

Clare Leavenworth

Assistant

Amy Lemisch

Associate Producer

Gaetano Lisi

Assistant Director

Frank Loesser

Song

George Loomis

Camera Operator

Gloria Mallah

Production Assistant

Mollie S Mallinger

Assistant Camera Operator

Mark Mamalakis

Assistant

Babaloo Mandel

Screenplay

Richard Marks

Special Thanks To

Penny Marshall

Executive Producer

Richard Marx

Song

Bernadette Mazur

Makeup Artist

Suzanne Mccabe

Assistant Costume Designer

Jimmy Mchugh

Song

Scott Millan

Rerecording

Irving Mills

Song

Karen Minahan

Assistant Sound Editor

Dick Mingalone

Camera Operator

Gary Muller

Assistant Camera Operator

Ted Nathanson

Special Thanks To

Linda B Neuffer

Makeup Artist

Jack Norworth

Song

David Obermeyer

Sound Mixer

Terry Odem

Assistant

Miroslav Ondricek

Director Of Photography

Miroslav Ondricek

Dp/Cinematographer

Bill Pace

Coproducer

Richard Padgett

Transportation Co-Captain

Lavone Pepper Paire Davis

Song

Lavone Pepper Paire Davis

Technical Advisor

Francesca Paris

Hair Stylist

Andrew G Patterson

Dialogue Editor

Doug Pelligrino

Assistant Camera Operator

Laura Perlman

Music Editor

Michele Perrone

Adr Editor

Shep Pettibone

Song

Shep Pettibone

Song Performer

Andrew Priestley

Assistant Camera Operator

Tom Priestley

Photography

Tom Priestley

Camera Operator

Mitch Ptaszek

Transportation Co-Captain

Ed Quinn

Key Grip

Shannon Rayle

Art Department Coordinator

Cleve Reinhard

Production Accountant

Ilyse A. Reutlinger

Assistant

Jay Rifkin

Music

Linda R Rizzuto

Hair Stylist

Richard Rodgers

Song

Billy Rose

Song

John Rusk

Assistant Director

Rebecca Saionz

Dga Trainee

Matthew Salvato

Assistant Location Manager

Monique Salvato

Assistant Sound Editor

Chris Scheetz

Foreman

Doron Shauly

Assistant Editor

Christopher Shihar

Hair Stylist

Fredda Slavin

Assistant Art Director

Jon-michael Smith

Special Thanks To

Rusty Smith

Assistant Art Director

Armin Steiner

Other

James Taylor

Song Performer

Douglas Tirola

Production Secretary

Robert Topol

Scenic Artist

Tony Trotta

Scenic Artist

Albert Von Tilzer

Song

Shirley Walker

Music Conductor

Jim Weis

Production Assistant

Charles B. Wessler

Special Thanks To

Kimberly Whitehead

Production Assistant

Patty Willett

Production Assistant

Jeffrey A. Williams

Boom Operator

Kim Wilson

Story By

Kim Wilson

From Story

John Wolanczyk

Scenic Artist

Hans Zimmer

Music

Videos

Movie Clip

Hosted Intro

Film Details

Also Known As
League of Their Own, Tjejligan, Une équipe hors du commun, équipe hors du commun
MPAA Rating
Genre
Comedy
Drama
Sports
Period
Release Date
1992
Production Company
C Douglas Cameron
Distribution Company
Sony Pictures Releasing
Location
Cooperstown, New York, USA; Chicago, Illinois, USA; Henderson, Kentucky, USA; Evansville, Indiana, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
2h 8m

Articles

A League of Their Own


In 1992, Columbia Pictures released A League of Their Own, a fictionalized account of the All-American Girl's Professional Baseball League. The brainchild of chewing gum mogul P. K. Wrigley, the A.A.G.P.B.L. propelled women to the forefront of baseball during WWII in the absence of male players. Created in 1942, the chronicles of the league were parlayed into a 1988 documentary by Kelly Candaele, son of one of the most talented players of her time, Helen Callaghan. Four years later, Penny Marshall borrowed the same title for her flick--A League of Their Own became a phenomenon of its own, grossing over $107 million. Bolstered by an impressive cast, including Tom Hanks and Geena Davis, the film succeeded in educating a global audience about an unprecedented gender experiment in the male-dominated history of baseball.

Penny Marshall knows a thing or two about male-dominated fields; starting her career as one-half of the 70's television series Laverne and Shirley, she admirably transitioned to a directorial role with Big (1988), becoming the first female director to gross over $100 million. She was reunited with her star in that film, Tom Hanks, in A League of Their Own and this time he plays Jimmy Dugan, a character loosely based on past baseball great Jimmy Foxx. Like Dugan, Foxx had a shortened career due to alcoholism, forcing him into managing the women's leagues. The film's main storyline centers around two sisters, Dottie and Kit, played by Davis and Lori Petty. The characters were based on siblings Callaghan and Margaret Maxwell, who were both players in the league, although the film's rivalry was invented for the benefit of entertainment. Interestingly enough, one of Callaghan's sons, Casey Candaele, went on to play for the pros - the only child of a women's leaguer to do so. Wrigley himself is characterized in the film as Walter Harvey, a candy bar titan played by Garry Marshall, Penny's brother. The family reunion doesn't end there: Penny's daughter, Tracy Reiner, and her niece, Kathleen Marshall, were cast in supporting roles.

Geena Davis joined the cast following the departure of Debra Winger, supposedly precipitated by the signing on of Madonna. In another substitution, Petty was cast after Moira Kelly was forced to bow out after sustaining an injury during the filming of The Cutting Edge (1992). Rosie O'Donnell took a turn playing Madonna's wiseacre sidekick prior to her talk show success, and SNL alum Jon Lovitz has a memorable featured role as a scouting agent, a part that was drastically cut down from its original proportions.

Sharp-eyed viewers may notice another reunion taking place during the film: two Laverne and Shirley cohorts play bit roles in the film. David L. Lander, a.k.a. Squiggy, has an uncredited role as the Radio sportscaster, and Eddie Mekka, who played Carmine "The Big Ragu" Ragusa in the TV series, is Madonna's dance partner in the jitterbug scene. The bar in which the scene was filmed is Fitzgerald's, located in Berwyn, Illinois; it took three weeks there to film a five-minute sequence.

The role of Jimmy Dugan was originally supposed to be in his mid-fifties, but Hanks pled with Marshall to play him younger. Marshall had concerns about Dugan becoming too appealing to the audience in a younger form, so in a compromise, Hanks gained thirty pounds to amplify the image of a slovenly sot. An early version of the script featuring a romantic subplot between Jimmy and Dottie was also phased out. Bill Pullman, incidentally, played Dottie's husband, prior to his mainstream success in Independence Day (1996). Another bit role in the film is Tea Leoni; she plays a Racine infielder. The success of A League of Their Own inspired a television series of the same name in 1993; although it featured original supporting cast and episodes directed by Hanks, it only lasted one season. The A.A.G.P.B.L., however, spanned twelve seasons, lasting until 1953, and the league was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1988. And that's the final inning, folks!

Producer: Elliot Abbott, Robert Greenhut
Director: Penny Marshall
Screenplay: Lowell Ganz, Babaloo Mandel, Kim Wilson, based on the story by Kelly Candaele
Art Direction: Tim Galvin
Cinematography: Miroslav Ondricek, Michael Yada
Editing: Adam Bernardi, George Bowers
Music: Hans Zimmer
Cast: Geena Davis (Dottie Hinson), Tom Hanks (Jimmy Dugan), Madonna (Mae Mordabito), Lori Petty (Kit Keller), Jon Lovitz (Ernie Capadino), David Strathairn (Ira Lowenstein), Garry Marshall (Walter Harvey), Rosie O'Donnell (Doris Murphy).
C-128m. Letterboxed. Closed captioning.

by Eleanor Quin
A League Of Their Own

A League of Their Own

In 1992, Columbia Pictures released A League of Their Own, a fictionalized account of the All-American Girl's Professional Baseball League. The brainchild of chewing gum mogul P. K. Wrigley, the A.A.G.P.B.L. propelled women to the forefront of baseball during WWII in the absence of male players. Created in 1942, the chronicles of the league were parlayed into a 1988 documentary by Kelly Candaele, son of one of the most talented players of her time, Helen Callaghan. Four years later, Penny Marshall borrowed the same title for her flick--A League of Their Own became a phenomenon of its own, grossing over $107 million. Bolstered by an impressive cast, including Tom Hanks and Geena Davis, the film succeeded in educating a global audience about an unprecedented gender experiment in the male-dominated history of baseball. Penny Marshall knows a thing or two about male-dominated fields; starting her career as one-half of the 70's television series Laverne and Shirley, she admirably transitioned to a directorial role with Big (1988), becoming the first female director to gross over $100 million. She was reunited with her star in that film, Tom Hanks, in A League of Their Own and this time he plays Jimmy Dugan, a character loosely based on past baseball great Jimmy Foxx. Like Dugan, Foxx had a shortened career due to alcoholism, forcing him into managing the women's leagues. The film's main storyline centers around two sisters, Dottie and Kit, played by Davis and Lori Petty. The characters were based on siblings Callaghan and Margaret Maxwell, who were both players in the league, although the film's rivalry was invented for the benefit of entertainment. Interestingly enough, one of Callaghan's sons, Casey Candaele, went on to play for the pros - the only child of a women's leaguer to do so. Wrigley himself is characterized in the film as Walter Harvey, a candy bar titan played by Garry Marshall, Penny's brother. The family reunion doesn't end there: Penny's daughter, Tracy Reiner, and her niece, Kathleen Marshall, were cast in supporting roles. Geena Davis joined the cast following the departure of Debra Winger, supposedly precipitated by the signing on of Madonna. In another substitution, Petty was cast after Moira Kelly was forced to bow out after sustaining an injury during the filming of The Cutting Edge (1992). Rosie O'Donnell took a turn playing Madonna's wiseacre sidekick prior to her talk show success, and SNL alum Jon Lovitz has a memorable featured role as a scouting agent, a part that was drastically cut down from its original proportions. Sharp-eyed viewers may notice another reunion taking place during the film: two Laverne and Shirley cohorts play bit roles in the film. David L. Lander, a.k.a. Squiggy, has an uncredited role as the Radio sportscaster, and Eddie Mekka, who played Carmine "The Big Ragu" Ragusa in the TV series, is Madonna's dance partner in the jitterbug scene. The bar in which the scene was filmed is Fitzgerald's, located in Berwyn, Illinois; it took three weeks there to film a five-minute sequence. The role of Jimmy Dugan was originally supposed to be in his mid-fifties, but Hanks pled with Marshall to play him younger. Marshall had concerns about Dugan becoming too appealing to the audience in a younger form, so in a compromise, Hanks gained thirty pounds to amplify the image of a slovenly sot. An early version of the script featuring a romantic subplot between Jimmy and Dottie was also phased out. Bill Pullman, incidentally, played Dottie's husband, prior to his mainstream success in Independence Day (1996). Another bit role in the film is Tea Leoni; she plays a Racine infielder. The success of A League of Their Own inspired a television series of the same name in 1993; although it featured original supporting cast and episodes directed by Hanks, it only lasted one season. The A.A.G.P.B.L., however, spanned twelve seasons, lasting until 1953, and the league was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1988. And that's the final inning, folks! Producer: Elliot Abbott, Robert Greenhut Director: Penny Marshall Screenplay: Lowell Ganz, Babaloo Mandel, Kim Wilson, based on the story by Kelly Candaele Art Direction: Tim Galvin Cinematography: Miroslav Ondricek, Michael Yada Editing: Adam Bernardi, George Bowers Music: Hans Zimmer Cast: Geena Davis (Dottie Hinson), Tom Hanks (Jimmy Dugan), Madonna (Mae Mordabito), Lori Petty (Kit Keller), Jon Lovitz (Ernie Capadino), David Strathairn (Ira Lowenstein), Garry Marshall (Walter Harvey), Rosie O'Donnell (Doris Murphy). C-128m. Letterboxed. Closed captioning. by Eleanor Quin

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Nominated by the Hollywood Foreign Press Association for two Golden Globe (1992) awards, including best actress -- musical or comedy (Geena Davis).

Released in United States Summer July 1, 1992

Released in United States on Video February 17, 1993

Released in United States June 25, 1992

Shown at benefit screening in New York City for New York Women in Film and Sloan Hospital for Women June 25, 1992.

Debra Winger was replaced by Geena Davis.

David Anspaugh was once attached as director.

Completed shooting October 30, 1991.

Began shooting July 10, 1991.

Project was with 20th Century Fox before Columbia.

Released in United States Summer July 1, 1992

Released in United States on Video February 17, 1993

Released in United States June 25, 1992 (Shown at benefit screening in New York City for New York Women in Film and Sloan Hospital for Women June 25, 1992.)