Wake Up and Dream


1h 32m 1946

Brief Synopsis

Henry Pecket (Clem Bevans) keeps a land-bound, home-made sloop in the backyard of his boarding house ran by widow Sara March (Charlotte Greenwood), who is tolerant of the fancied trips around the world taken by her "ancient mariner" boarder. Little Nella Cairn (Connie Marshall,)another boarder, is his constant companion on the sloop's "trips." When her brother, Jeff Cairn (John Payne), enlists in the Navy, Nella is sent to board with a cousin, but is unhappy and returns to the boarding house. Pecket sends for Jenny (June Haver), a waitress for Mr. Agrippa (Oliver Blake) at his lunchroom and sweetheart of Jeff. Pecket and Jenny together decide to take care of Nella, when she receives a telegram from the War Department advising that Jeff is missing in action. To console the young girl, Pecket tells her they'll sail out to a wonderful island he knows about where he is sure Jeff can be found. The widow March, incensed about gossip she hears that Pecket is entertaining women guests on his boat, sells it to Mr. Agrippa, who wants to make a hamburger stand out of it. He has a man install wheels on it and plans to tow it away the next day. Pecket, Jenny and Nella have a meeting on the boat, a storm blows up, and since the sails are set, the "Sara March" puts out to "sea,", where it becomes "reefed" in a haystack. A young itinerant dentist, Howard Williams (John Ireland), offers to tow them but runs out of gas just as they reach Dignman's Ferry. He suggests they launch the boat, and all hands, including Williams, who comes in handy when they encounter a scientist in need of dental work, set sail on an enchanted voyage for Pecket's rendezvous island..to find Jeff.

Film Details

Also Known As
Give Me the Simple Life, The Enchanted Voyage
Release Date
Dec 1946
Premiere Information
Los Angeles opening: 27 Nov 1946
Production Company
Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corp.
Distribution Company
Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corp.
Country
United States
Location
Arcadia, California, United States; Lake Pontchartrain, Louisiana, United States; New Orleans, Louisiana, United States
Screenplay Information
Based on the novel The Enchanted Voyage by Robert Nathan (New York, 1936).

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 32m
Sound
Mono
Color
Color (Technicolor)
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1
Film Length
8,289ft (10 reels)

Synopsis

In 1943, in the small town of Pinedale, Jeff Cairns has had a run of bad luck in trying to keep the family farm going after the death of his father. Jeff is secretly in love with Jenny, a waitress at a local diner, but she finds him too humble and lacking in assertiveness. Because her boss, Mr. Agrippa, needs a carpenter, in short supply due to the war, Jenny suggests Henry Pecket, an elderly eccentric who has built a sailboat in his back yard, 300 miles from the nearest body of water, and sails with Jeff's little sister Nella on imaginary voyages. When Jeff, Nella and her dog Tipsy go to eat at the diner, Nella tells Jeff that Jenny will never marry him because he is a farmer. Jeff then announces that he has joined the Navy and intends to send Nella to live with a cousin. When Jeff puts her on a bus to her cousin's the next day, Nella tells him that if he is ever in trouble he should head for a special island with white sand and palm trees where she will be able to find him. Later, Jenny sees Jeff off at the railroad station and realizing her true feelings, asks him to come back to her. Some time after having offered his boat to the Navy, Henry receives a series of misinformed bureaucratic responses. Meanwhile, Jenny receives a letter from Jeff saying that he is enjoying Navy life. One day, Henry discovers Nella and Tipsy at the boat and learns that they have run away and want to stay with him. Henry tells Jenny about Nella's arrival and when she comes to see her, Nella shows her a telegram she has received from the government explaining that Jeff is missing in action. Nella tells Jenny not to worry though, because Jeff will simply go to the special island and wait for them to find him. Henry's landlady, Sara March, after whom he has named his boat, is advised of Jenny's nocturnal visit by a nosy neighbor and, in retaliation, sells Henry's boat to the diner's owner for use as a hamburger stand. That same night, during a heavy rainstorm, Jenny, Nella and Tipsy come to spend the night on the boat as they have been evicted from where they were staying. The intensity of the storm increases, causing the boat, which is on wheels ready to be moved, to break away from its moorings and sail away through the town's streets. The next morning, all four find themselves marooned in a hay field where they meet Howard Williams, a former pharmacist's mate who was given a medical discharge because of his allergies. Because Nella wants to go on to look for the "island," Howard attempts to tow them with his truck. Eventually the roads lead them to a toll bridge where the truck runs out of gas, causing a line of vehicles to form behind it. They then launch the boat into the creek, where it proves to be watertight. Howard heads off on his own but returns the next day with supplies for the voyage and Julie tells him about her relationship with Jeff. When a U.S. Coast Guard patrol intercepts the boat, seeking its registration papers, Nella tells the officer about their search for Jeff, and to everyone's surprise he allows them to continue. Later, after the boat becomes stuck on a mud bank in a swampy area, Jenny starts to think and begins to feel guilty about not having been more appreciative of Jeff's qualities. Nella goes off by herself and encounters an old hermit whom she thinks is Robinson Crusoe. Meanwhile Jeff has returned unscathed to Pinedale where Sara shows him a postcard she has recently received from the trio, apparently from Valparaiso. Sara blames herself for their having left and sets off with Jeff to look for them. They persuade the Coast Guard to mount a search for the boat. When the Coast Guard patrol finally finds them, Nella sees their rescue as the end of their attempts to find the "island" and Jeff. Jenny then must finally tell Nella that the imaginary island does not exsist and the child runs off into the swamp. There she is found by Jeff, who has arrived with the patrol. Jeff and Jenny reunite but when they must appear before the Coast Guard's commanding officer, he severely criticizes their actions. Nella then tells him that he is just jealous that Mr. Pecket's expedition found Jeff while the Coast Guards' did not. After the patrol boat's officer whispers to the commanding officer about the expedition's dream, the C.O. changes his tone, apologizes to "Captain" Pecket, and invites them all to dinner in the officers' mess. There, after he reads several fictitious, congratulatory telegrams attesting to Pecket's belief in the rightness of a child's heart, the officers stand and salute Nella.

Film Details

Also Known As
Give Me the Simple Life, The Enchanted Voyage
Release Date
Dec 1946
Premiere Information
Los Angeles opening: 27 Nov 1946
Production Company
Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corp.
Distribution Company
Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corp.
Country
United States
Location
Arcadia, California, United States; Lake Pontchartrain, Louisiana, United States; New Orleans, Louisiana, United States
Screenplay Information
Based on the novel The Enchanted Voyage by Robert Nathan (New York, 1936).

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 32m
Sound
Mono
Color
Color (Technicolor)
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1
Film Length
8,289ft (10 reels)

Quotes

Trivia

Notes

The film's working titles were The Enchanted Voyage and Give Me the Simple Life. According to documents in the Twentieth Century-Fox Records of the Legal Department and the Twentieth Century-Fox Produced Scripts Collection at the UCLA Arts-Special Collections Library, the studio bought the rights to Robert Nathan's novel for $10,000 in July 1936, as a potential vehicle for Shirley Temple. Treatments were written in 1936 by Sam Hellman, Gladys Lehman and Hal Long. In 1942, Francis Edwards Faragoh wrote a screenplay based on the novel, but Elick Moll was the sole writer of the filmed screenplay.
       Although actress Lee Patrick's name is included in the onscreen credits as "The Blonde," her role was elimianted from the final picture. She is briefly visible in the background of the diner sequence at the beginning of the film. Information contained in the CBCS, various studio records and the viewed print reveal that the following actors were in scenes eliminated before the film's release: Marvin Davis, Harlan Briggs, Kathryn Sheldon, Alphonse Martell, Gene Collins and Billy Cummings. According to a Twentieth Century-Fox publicity release in May 1945, a second unit, headed by cameramen Harry Jackson and Joseph MacDonald, filmed in bayous around New Orleans and on Lake Pontchartrain, LA. California filming began in mid-June 1945, with a week of filming on the studio lot followed by a week of exteriors in Arcadia, CA in the area that became the Los Angeles County Arboretum. Some sources erroneously include the song "Into the Sun" in the film.