Interrupted Melody


1h 46m 1955
Interrupted Melody

Brief Synopsis

True story of Australian opera singer Marjorie Lawrence and her battle against polio.

Film Details

Genre
Drama
Musical
Biography
Music
Adaptation
Release Date
Jul 1, 1955
Premiere Information
World premiere in Melbourne, Australia: 20 Apr 1955; New York opening: 5 May 1955
Production Company
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Corp.
Distribution Company
Loew's Inc.
Country
United States
Screenplay Information
Based on the book Interrupted Melody by Marjorie Lawrence (New York, 1949).

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 46m
Color
Color (Eastmancolor)
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
2.55 : 1
Film Length
9,475ft (13 reels)

Synopsis

Early one morning, Marjorie Lawrence sneaks away from her family's sheep farm near Winchelsea, Australia, and catches a train to Geelong to compete in the operatic vocal competition. The following morning, Marjorie's father Bill reads in the newspaper that she has won the competition and been awarded a scholarship to study music in Paris. To the delight of her brothers and sisters, Bill lets Marjorie go with his blessing. In Paris, Marjorie is accepted as a pupil of renowned voice teacher Madame Gilly. A year later, Bill dies, and the grief-stricken Marjorie is ready to return to the farm when Madame Gilly informs the young singer that she has been selected for a production of La Bohème in Monte Carlo. Marjorie's operatic debut is a success, and she is offered a two-year contract. Overcome with emotion and lonely for her family, Marjorie meets an American, Dr. Thomas King, in the lobby of her Monte Carlo hotel. Thomas takes Marjorie out, and as they celebrate her opening with dancing and champagne, they begin to fall in love. Thomas tells her he has just completed a year's research at the Sorbonne and is about to return to the States to work at a children's hospital in New York City. After kissing passionately, Thomas and Marjorie reluctantly part so he can catch his boat.

With her brother Cyril serving as her business manager, Marjorie goes on to triumph in several major operatic roles, and is invited to perform with the Paris Opera. Soon Marjorie makes her Metropolitan Opera debut, unaware that Thomas is watching from the balcony. Thomas goes backstage to congratulate her, and although she does not recognize him at first, Marjorie arranges for him to attend her opening night party. Thomas tells Marjorie he is becoming an obstetrician, and questions her about rumors that she is engaged to Comte Claude des Vigneux. Marjorie agrees to leave her party and go for a walk with Thomas, and soon begins avoiding the Comte's calls, to Cyril's dismay. As time passes, however, Marjorie grows frustrated over Thomas' reluctance to advance their relationship, and confronts him in his office. Thomas explains that her demanding career would get in the way of a stable marriage, so it is best that they stop seeing each other.

Unwilling to give him up, Marjorie cancels her foreign engagements and assures Thomas she wants nothing more than to be his wife. They marry, and Marjorie jeopardizes her career with the Metropolitan Opera when she refuses to go on tour in Latin America to prepare for her role in Tristan und Isolde . Thomas insists that she go on tour, but refuses to leave his practice and accompany her lest he become nothing more than "Mr. Marjorie Lawrence." Later, during rehearsals, Marjorie begins to suffer from headaches, and her voice falters badly. She suddenly collapses, and Thomas flies to Latin America to be with her. Medical tests indicate that she has polio, and when Thomas visits Marjorie in the hospital, he finds her completely paralyzed. Marjorie eventually regains the use of her arms and shoulders, but her spirits remain low, and Thomas takes her to Florida to convalesce. One day, Thomas puts one of Marjorie's recordings on the phonograph and leaves the room, despite her pleas to turn it off.

In desperation, Marjorie manages to crawl over to the phonograph and knock it over before collapsing in tears. When Thomas points out that she has succeeded in moving, Marjorie at last sees a glimmer of hope. She gradually begins singing again, and secures a guest engagement with the Florida Philharmonic Orchestra, but panics and flees when it comes time to go onstage in her wheelchair. The following morning, Marjorie accidentally discovers that Thomas is struggling financially and has sold all the medical equipment in his New York office. She attempts to kill herself by taking an overdose of pills, but Thomas comes home unexpectedly and stops her. Convinced that Thomas really loves her the way she is, Marjorie urges him to return to New York alone and rebuild his practice while she remains in Florida with their maid Clara. Several weeks later, Thomas' old friend, Dr. Ed Ryson, drops by to visit. Ed, who is in the Army now, asks Marjorie to sing for the soldiers at the hospital, and as she faces the room full of injured men--many of them also in wheelchairs--she rediscovers her confidence and pleasure in singing. Marjorie goes on to entertain the troops overseas, then returns to the Metropolitan to sing in a production of Tristan und Isolde that has been staged to accommodate her handicap.

The day of the opening, Cyril calls on Thomas, who admits that he is terrified on Marjorie's behalf. That night, wearing leg braces under her costume, Marjorie performs with great poise and even manages to take a couple of hesitant steps. As Thomas watches her lovingly from the wings, an overcome Marjorie receives an enthusiastic ovation.

Cast

Glenn Ford

Dr. Thomas King

Eleanor Parker

Marjorie Lawrence

Roger Moore

Cyril Lawrence

Cecil Kellaway

Bill Lawrence

Peter Leeds

Dr. Editor Ryson

Evelyn Ellis

Clara

Sandy Descher

Suzie

Walter Baldwin

Jim Owens

Ann Codee

Mme. Gilly

Leopold Sachse

Himself

Stephen Bekassy

Comte Claude Designer Vigneux

Charles R. Keane

Ted Lawrence

Fiona Hale

Eileen Lawrence

Rudolf Petrak

Tenor

Claude Stroud

Tenor

Stapleton Kent

Station man

Ann Howard

Contestant

Donna Jo Gribble

Contestant

Janet Comerford

Contestant

Phyllis Coghlan

Mother

Ivis Goulding

Mother

Jean Fenwick

Mother

Doris Lloyd

Volunteer worker

Alex Frazer

Adjudicator

Penny Santon

Mme. Gilly's secretary

Phyllis Altivo

Louise

Peter Camlin

French messenger

George Davis

French hotel clerk

David Leonard

Elderly man

Eugene Borden

French headwaiter

Jerry Martin

Taxi driver

Gabor Curtiz

Tenor's manager

Andre Charlot

M. Bertrand

Paul Mcguire

Metropolitan cashier

Doris Merrick

Nurse

Jo Gilbert

Nurse

Lois Kimbrille

Nurse

Sandra Descher

Suzie

Jack Raine

Mr. Norson

Freda Stoll

Accompanist

Gloria Rhods

Mrs. Schultz

William Vedder

Metropolitan attendant

Charles Evans

Director of Metropolitan

Martin Garralaga

Dr. Ortega

William Forrest

Dr. Richards

Stuart Whitman

Man on the beach

Bob Dix

Man on the beach

Paul Bryar

Florida conductor

Walter Du Cloux

Metropolitan conductor

Jack Grinnage

Corp. Michael Watkins

Robert Carson

Brigadier general

Michael Dugan

Sentry

Lomax Study

Metropolitan stage manager

Edward Colmans

Italian man

Anthony Merrill

Assistant stage manager

Gene Roth

King Mark

John Close

Tristan man

William Olvis

Tenor in "Seguidilla" seq

Heinz Blankenberg

Baritone in La Bohème, Il Trovatore and Tristan und Isolde seq

Edwin Dunning

Baritone in La Bohème seq

Charles Gonzales

Bass in La Bohème seq

Desire Ligeti

Bass in Tristan und Isolde seq

Marcella Reale

Soprano in La Bohème seq

Armand Tokatyan

Tenor in La Bohème seq

Jean Bonacorsi

Contralto in Tristan und Isolde seq

Tudor Williams

Singer in Tristan und Isolde seq

Frederick Klassen

Singer in Tristan und Isolde seq

Gilbert Russell

Tenor in Il Trovatore seq

Jeanne Determan

Soprano in Tristan und Isolde seq

Joseph Gaudio

Samson in Samson and Delilah seq

Colin Harvey

Singer

Francis Barnes

Singer

Edwin Dunning

Singer

John Ford

Singer

Oliver Cross

Estelle Etterre

Bess Flowers

Edwin Tuttle

Louis Bates

Major Sam Harris

Crew

Harold Arlen

Composer

Georges Bizet

Composer

James Brock

Sound

Lew Brown

Composer

Ridgeway Callow

Assistant Director

Salvatore Cammarano

Composer

Daniel B. Cathcart

Art Director

Saul Chaplin

Music Supervisor

Marie Cowan

Composer

Jack Cummings

Producer

Adolph Deutsch

Dramatic Music score Adapted and Conductor

William Douglas

Composer

Walter Du Cloux

Operatic rec Supervisor and Conductor

Camille Du Locle

Composer

John Dunning

Film Editor

Harry Edwards

Props

Alvord Eiseman

Color Consultant

Eileen Farrell

Singing voice double for Eleanor Parker

Harold Gelman

Music adv

Ralph George

Sound Editing

Giuseppe Giacosa

Composer

Cedric Gibbons

Art Director

Sydney Guilaroff

Hair Styles

Ludovic Halévy

Composer

E. Y. Harburg

Composer

Kurt Hernnfeld

Sound Editing

Luigi Illica

Composer

Larry Keethe

Props

Mollie Kent

Script Supervisor

Ferdinand Lemaire

Composer

Sonya Levien

Writer

R. Lovell

Composer

William Ludwig

Writer

Marjorie Mackay

Assistant to Vladimir Rosing

Jay Marchant

Unit Manager

Henri Meilhac

Composer

François Joseph Méry

Composer

Alfred Hart Miles

Composer

Wesley C. Miller

Recording Supervisor

Jack D. Moore

Set Decoration

Warren Newcombe

Special Effects

Jacques Offenbach

Composer

A. B. Paterson

Composer

L. Z. Phillips

Composer

Giacomo Puccini

Composer

Helen Rose

Costume Design

Vladimir Rosing

Operatic seq staged by

Joseph Ruttenberg

Director of Photography

Camille Saint-saëns

Composer

Lady John Scott

Composer

Sam Stept

Composer

Eric Von Stroheim Jr.

Assistant Director

Charles Tobias

Composer

William Tuttle

Makeup created by

Giuseppe Verdi

Composer

Paul C. Vogel

Director of Photography

Richard Wagner

Composer

Edwin B. Willis

Set Decoration

Charles A. Zimmerman

Composer

Videos

Movie Clip

Interrupted Melody (1955) - Carmen Now touring Italy, Australian soprano Marjorie Lawrence (Eleanor Parker), with her manager-brother (Roger Moore) meets a count (Stephen Bekassy), then in Bizet's Carmen, the "Seguidilla," aims to seduce her captor (William Olvis), in the MGM bio-pic Interrupted Melody, 1955.
Interrupted Melody (1955) - That's What Wagner Wrote! Preparing to perform at New York's Metropolitan Opera, 1936, Australian Marjorie Lawrence (Eleanor Parker) tangles with director Leopold Sachse (playing himself) over Wagner, then does it her way, which really happened, Glenn Ford her cheering husband, in MGM's Interrupted Melody, 1955.
Interrupted Melody (1955) - Are You A Dane? On the evening of her successful opera debut in Monte Carlo, 1932, Australian singer Marjorie Lawrence (Eleanor Parker) phones home, handsome American doctor Tom (Glenn Ford) overhearing, celebrating and establishing the love-interest, in the MGM bio-pic Interrupted Melody, 1955.
Interrupted Melody (1955) - Winchelsea In 1928 Australia, young singer Marjorie Lawrence (Eleanor Parker) races to a regional competition (her stunt double ducking behind the crates), arriving just in time to deliver her Verdi aria, pretty much historically accurate, early in MGM's Interrupted Melody, 1955.
Interrupted Melody (1955) - You Came 14,000 Miles Clever vignette on the arrival of Australian singer Marjorie Lawrence (Eleanor Parker) in Paris, ca. 1929, bumping into Glenn Ford, who will feature later, then an impromptu audition for Mme. Gilly (Ann Codee), whose struggling pupil is Eileen Farrell, the soprano who dubbed Parker's singing, in the bio-pic Interrupted Melody, 1955.

Trailer

Film Details

Genre
Drama
Musical
Biography
Music
Adaptation
Release Date
Jul 1, 1955
Premiere Information
World premiere in Melbourne, Australia: 20 Apr 1955; New York opening: 5 May 1955
Production Company
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Corp.
Distribution Company
Loew's Inc.
Country
United States
Screenplay Information
Based on the book Interrupted Melody by Marjorie Lawrence (New York, 1949).

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 46m
Color
Color (Eastmancolor)
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
2.55 : 1
Film Length
9,475ft (13 reels)

Award Wins

Best Writing, Screenplay

1956

Award Nominations

Best Actress

1955
Eleanor Parker

Best Costume Design

1955
Helen Rose

Articles

Interrupted Melody


It's easy to understand why Interrupted Melody (1955) was actress Eleanor Parker's favorite film performance. The life story of Australian opera singer Marjorie Lawrence had more drama than the average musical biography. Lawrence was paralyzed by polio at the peak of her career in 1941, and courageously fought her way back to performing with the help of her physician husband. Sumptuously filmed in Cinemascope and Technicolor, with stunning operatic sequences, Interrupted Melody was nominated for three Academy Awards, including a Best Actress nomination for Parker. The film won one Oscar® for best story and screenplay.

Lawrence had published her autobiography, also called Interrupted Melody, in 1949. MGM bought it as a vehicle for Lana Turner in 1952, but Turner was deemed too lightweight for the role. Greer Garson was also considered, but she was no longer as big a star as she had been in the 1940s, and by the time the film was ready for production, she had left the studio. Producer Jack Cummings had never considered Parker for the role - he thought she was too ordinary and mild-mannered to play a diva. When Parker learned this, she stormed into Cummings' office and proceeded to display some diva temperament, telling him how the role should be played. Cummings eventually realized that Parker's flamboyant act was just that, and decided she would be fine as Lawrence. Parker, who knew nothing about opera, threw herself into the part, taking voice lessons and learning 22 arias in several languages so she would be able to lip-synch credibly. Parker recalled that she drove to work "with the score propped up on the steering wheel of my car, and I woke up at night to find I'd been repeating the songs in my sleep." According to director Curtis Bernhardt, Parker "screamed the songs. That's what probably made it look genuine. She had never seen an opera in her life." However she did it, Parker's lip-synching was perfect.

Lawrence was still very much alive when the film was made, but had retired from performing in 1952 and had turned to teaching voice. Polio had damaged her abdominal muscles, so although she was supposed to dub the vocals that Parker would lip-sync, she was no longer up to the vocal demands of singing opera. Eileen Farrell, then a well-known concert singer who had not yet made her opera debut, agreed to dub the vocals. Like Parker, Farrell was easy to work with and un-diva-like, and she insisted that she get no screen credit for her singing - she did not want to embarrass Lawrence. However, Lawrence herself went public with the information, suing MGM for not allowing her to sing the arias in Interrupted Melody. Farrell has a witty cameo in the film as a fellow opera singer who can't hit the high notes. Farrell made her grand opera debut in 1956, became one of the best-known opera singers of her era, and also one of the first to record a pop album.

Lack of familiarity with opera was not Parker's only challenge. The real Lawrence had grown up in rural Australia, and was an expert horseback rider. In fact, when she played Brunnhilde in Gotterdammerung at the Metropolitan Opera in New York, Lawrence stunned audiences in the climactic scene where her character charges into her lover's funeral pyre on horseback, one of the most famous - and challenging - moments in Wagnerian opera. Most singers would walk the horse sedately, or even get off the horse and lead it. Lawrence went into the flames at full gallop, a scene that is repeated in Interrupted Melody, with a stunt double, since Parker could not ride. A scene early in the film where Lawrence rides to the railroad station involved some trickery, because Bernhardt shot it all in one shot. As she arrives at the station, Parker's stunt double dismounts and goes behind some boxes, then Parker emerges from behind the boxes and walks towards the camera.

Interrupted Melody earned Parker some of the best reviews of her career, with such superlatives as "electrifying" and "outstanding," as well as raves for the entire production, script, directing, music, cinematography, and costumes (also Oscar-nominated). Parker earned her third Oscar® nomination for the performance, but according to Parker biographer Doug McClelland, "M-G-M chose to put its promotional clout behind four-time nominee Susan Hayward in their bigger box-office I'll Cry Tomorrow, another biography of a musical star (Lillian Roth). Both lost to Anna Magnani for The Rose Tattoo." Parker followed Interrupted Melody with another strong performance, as Frank Sinatra's shrewish wife in The Man with the Golden Arm (1955), and continued to do good work until the mid-1960s. Interrupted Melody remains a career peak, and a personal best for the talented and beautiful actress.

Director: Curtis Bernhardt
Producer: Jack Cummings
Screenplay: William Ludwig, Sonya Levien, based on the book by Marjorie Lawrence
Cinematography: Joseph Ruttenberg, Paul C. Vogel
Editor: John Dunning
Costume Design: Helen Rose
Art Direction: Cedric Gibbons, Daniel B. Cathcart
Music: Adolph Deutsch
Principal Cast: Glenn Ford (Dr. Thomas King), Eleanor Parker (Marjorie Lawrence), Roger Moore (Cyril Lawrence), Cecil Kellaway (Bill Lawrence), Peter Leeds (Dr. Ed Ryson), Evelyn Ellis (Clara), Walter Baldwin (Jim Owens), Ann Codee (Mme. Gilly).
C-106m. Letterboxed. Closed captioning.

by Margarita Landazuri
Interrupted Melody

Interrupted Melody

It's easy to understand why Interrupted Melody (1955) was actress Eleanor Parker's favorite film performance. The life story of Australian opera singer Marjorie Lawrence had more drama than the average musical biography. Lawrence was paralyzed by polio at the peak of her career in 1941, and courageously fought her way back to performing with the help of her physician husband. Sumptuously filmed in Cinemascope and Technicolor, with stunning operatic sequences, Interrupted Melody was nominated for three Academy Awards, including a Best Actress nomination for Parker. The film won one Oscar® for best story and screenplay. Lawrence had published her autobiography, also called Interrupted Melody, in 1949. MGM bought it as a vehicle for Lana Turner in 1952, but Turner was deemed too lightweight for the role. Greer Garson was also considered, but she was no longer as big a star as she had been in the 1940s, and by the time the film was ready for production, she had left the studio. Producer Jack Cummings had never considered Parker for the role - he thought she was too ordinary and mild-mannered to play a diva. When Parker learned this, she stormed into Cummings' office and proceeded to display some diva temperament, telling him how the role should be played. Cummings eventually realized that Parker's flamboyant act was just that, and decided she would be fine as Lawrence. Parker, who knew nothing about opera, threw herself into the part, taking voice lessons and learning 22 arias in several languages so she would be able to lip-synch credibly. Parker recalled that she drove to work "with the score propped up on the steering wheel of my car, and I woke up at night to find I'd been repeating the songs in my sleep." According to director Curtis Bernhardt, Parker "screamed the songs. That's what probably made it look genuine. She had never seen an opera in her life." However she did it, Parker's lip-synching was perfect. Lawrence was still very much alive when the film was made, but had retired from performing in 1952 and had turned to teaching voice. Polio had damaged her abdominal muscles, so although she was supposed to dub the vocals that Parker would lip-sync, she was no longer up to the vocal demands of singing opera. Eileen Farrell, then a well-known concert singer who had not yet made her opera debut, agreed to dub the vocals. Like Parker, Farrell was easy to work with and un-diva-like, and she insisted that she get no screen credit for her singing - she did not want to embarrass Lawrence. However, Lawrence herself went public with the information, suing MGM for not allowing her to sing the arias in Interrupted Melody. Farrell has a witty cameo in the film as a fellow opera singer who can't hit the high notes. Farrell made her grand opera debut in 1956, became one of the best-known opera singers of her era, and also one of the first to record a pop album. Lack of familiarity with opera was not Parker's only challenge. The real Lawrence had grown up in rural Australia, and was an expert horseback rider. In fact, when she played Brunnhilde in Gotterdammerung at the Metropolitan Opera in New York, Lawrence stunned audiences in the climactic scene where her character charges into her lover's funeral pyre on horseback, one of the most famous - and challenging - moments in Wagnerian opera. Most singers would walk the horse sedately, or even get off the horse and lead it. Lawrence went into the flames at full gallop, a scene that is repeated in Interrupted Melody, with a stunt double, since Parker could not ride. A scene early in the film where Lawrence rides to the railroad station involved some trickery, because Bernhardt shot it all in one shot. As she arrives at the station, Parker's stunt double dismounts and goes behind some boxes, then Parker emerges from behind the boxes and walks towards the camera. Interrupted Melody earned Parker some of the best reviews of her career, with such superlatives as "electrifying" and "outstanding," as well as raves for the entire production, script, directing, music, cinematography, and costumes (also Oscar-nominated). Parker earned her third Oscar® nomination for the performance, but according to Parker biographer Doug McClelland, "M-G-M chose to put its promotional clout behind four-time nominee Susan Hayward in their bigger box-office I'll Cry Tomorrow, another biography of a musical star (Lillian Roth). Both lost to Anna Magnani for The Rose Tattoo." Parker followed Interrupted Melody with another strong performance, as Frank Sinatra's shrewish wife in The Man with the Golden Arm (1955), and continued to do good work until the mid-1960s. Interrupted Melody remains a career peak, and a personal best for the talented and beautiful actress. Director: Curtis Bernhardt Producer: Jack Cummings Screenplay: William Ludwig, Sonya Levien, based on the book by Marjorie Lawrence Cinematography: Joseph Ruttenberg, Paul C. Vogel Editor: John Dunning Costume Design: Helen Rose Art Direction: Cedric Gibbons, Daniel B. Cathcart Music: Adolph Deutsch Principal Cast: Glenn Ford (Dr. Thomas King), Eleanor Parker (Marjorie Lawrence), Roger Moore (Cyril Lawrence), Cecil Kellaway (Bill Lawrence), Peter Leeds (Dr. Ed Ryson), Evelyn Ellis (Clara), Walter Baldwin (Jim Owens), Ann Codee (Mme. Gilly). C-106m. Letterboxed. Closed captioning. by Margarita Landazuri

Quotes

Trivia

The vocal student of Mme Gilly who can't seem to hit the right note, which Marjorie Lawrence can, is Eileen Farrell (I), who dubbed Eleanor Parker (I)'s singing voice in the movie's arias.

Greer Garson was originally set to play the lead role of Marjorie Lawrence, but the film was postponed for about one year. Garson wanted the part very badly and researched the role extensively. One month after she left MGM (the studio filming the movie), 'Eleanor Parker' was cast.

Notes

The film's opening credits modified the standard disclaimer to read: "But for few people, events and institutions prominent in the world of opera, all other events, characters and institutions depicted in this photoplay are fictitious..." As depicted in the film, dramatic soprano Marjorie Lawrence (1907-1979) left her native Australia for Paris in 1928, and made her professional debut in Monte Carlo in 1932. She made her Metropolitan Opera debut in 1935, and was at the peak of her career when she married Dr. Thomas King in 1941. After being stricken with polio, Lawrence entertained troops in the South Pacific in 1944, and toured occupied Europe in 1945 and 1948. Lawrence stopped performing in 1952, and became a voice instructor and director of opera workshops.
       In an April 1955 article in Cosmopolitan, gossip columnist Louella O. Parsons wrote about attending a party at the home of agent Wynn Rocomora, at which Lawrence, King and actress Greer Garson were also guests. Parsons claimed that the idea for the film version of Lawrence's life was born that night, but that the project was delayed because of emergence of new technological developments, such as 3-D and CinemaScope: "The Lawrence story...had to wait until our producers found out whether the public was going to want its pictures upside down or inside out."
       December 1951 Hollywood Reporter news items named Deborah Kerr, and then Lana Turner, as the star of the film, and a July 1952 news item reported that Garson would portray Lawrence. Hollywood Reporter news items add Nestor Eristoff, Dick Simmons, James Drury and Ronald Green to the cast, but their appearance in the final film has not been confirmed. Although an April 1954 Hollywood Reporter news item stated that Lawrence's voice had been recorded for the film, opera star Eileen Farrell provided the singing voice for Lawrence's character. According to an October 1954 news item in Hollywood Reporter, Joseph Ruttenberg substituted for cinematographer Paul C. Vogel after Vogel was injured in an automobile accident. Both men are listed as directors of photography in the onscreen credits. A January 1953 Hollywood Reporter news item named Wolfgang Martin as music director, but Walter Du Cloux is credited onscreen. Leopold Sachse, who portrayed himself in the film, was a longtime stage director at the Metropolitan Opera.
       According to studio publicity material contained in the film's production file at the AMPAS Library, the design crew used oversized props, such as a telegram and pill bottle, so that these objects would appear normal-sized on the CinemaScope screen. Interrupted Melody received the Academy Award for Best Screenplay and was nominated for Best Actress (Eleanor Parker) and Best Costume Design (Color).

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States Summer July 1955

CinemaScope

Released in United States Summer July 1955