The Last Shot


1h 33m 2004

Brief Synopsis

Straight shooter agent Joe Devine has been assigned to cook up an elaborate scheme to take down infamous mob boss John Gotti. He assumes the role of a Hollywood producer and tells all the right lies to enlist a stooge to help execute his sting. He finds unsuspecting wannabe director Steven Schatz, w

Film Details

Also Known As
Last Shot, Providence
MPAA Rating
Release Date
2004
Distribution Company
Walt Disney Studios Distribution
Location
Rhode Island, USA; Los Angeles, California, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 33m

Synopsis

Straight shooter agent Joe Devine has been assigned to cook up an elaborate scheme to take down infamous mob boss John Gotti. He assumes the role of a Hollywood producer and tells all the right lies to enlist a stooge to help execute his sting. He finds unsuspecting wannabe director Steven Schatz, who'd do just about everything to get the chance to direct a "feature." Schatz falls hook, line, and sinker for the pitch, but what Devine doesn't tell Schatz is that the movie will never be made. Everything goes according to plan--until Devine and the suits at the Bureau start enjoying their new lives as "Hollywood players" a bit too much.

Crew

Bobby Aldridge

Stunts

Michael E Allegretto

Special Effects Assistant

Stuart Allen

Crane Grip

Jeremy Alter

Location Manager

Devon Renee Anderson

Assistant Costume Designer

Deborah Aquila

Casting

Harold Arlen

Song

William David Arnold

Production Designer

Jodi Baldwin

Costumes

Johnny Barbera

Foreman

Woody Bell

Best Boy Grip

Tom Bellfort

Supervising Sound Editor

Jennifer Bender

Extras Agent/Coordinator

Carlos Bermudez

Best Boy Electric

Tony Blondal

Original Music

Will Blount

Property Master

Bobbie Blyle

Production Assistant

Tony Boggs

Stunts

Bradley J Bovee

Stunts

Michael Boyle

Animal Trainer

Shelley Peterson Boyle

Animal Trainer

Larry Brezner

Producer

Paul Brickman

Other

Mark Brooks

Stunts

Michael Broomberg

Foley Artist

Tony Brubaker

Stunts

Mike Buck

Crane Grip

Paul Bucossi

Stunts

Brian Burrows

Stunts

Cristen Carr Strubbe

Unit Production Manager

Evelyn Carrigan

Production Assistant

Kerry Carter

Production Assistant

Mike Cassidy

Stunts

Monica Castro

Assistant Property Master

John Cenatiempo

Stunts

Amanda Chamberlin

Costumer

Ray Charles

Song Performer

Susan Christie

Craft Service

Lynn Christopher

Set Designer

Russell Cioe

Special Effects Assistant

Henry Cline

Camera Operator

Douglas Cluff

Scenic Artist

Brett Cody

Video

Stephen Coleman

Music Engineer

Erica Colgrove

Assistant Camera

Fred Cooper

Dolly Grip

Judith A. Cory

Hair Stylist

John Coven

Storyboard Artist

Jason Cox

Production Assistant

Michael Craig

Song

Rosemary Cremona

Assistant Director

Culture Club

Song Performer

Buck Damon

Consultant

Dr. Roger Danchik

Special Effects Assistant

Steve M Davison

Stunts

Mark Deallessandro

Stunts

Jenny Dearmitt

Production Secretary

Steve Demko

Production Assistant

Jeremy Derbyshire

Art Assistant

Dominique Derrenger

Accounting Assistant

Al Dollar

Art Department

Al Dollar

Construction

Peter Dress

Assistant Director

Casey Eastlick

Stunts

William Eliscu

Graphic Designer

Ellen Erwin

Coproducer

Corey Eubanks

Stunts

Ray Evans

Theme Music

Kenny Farnell

Transportation Co-Captain

Wes Farrell

Song

Nora Felder

Music Supervisor

Kim Ferandelli

Assistant

Robert Fernandez

Music Scoring Mixer

Robert Fernandez

Score Recording

Chris Ferrence

Transportation

Keith Fisher

Transportation Co-Captain

Steve Fishman

Source Material

Cliff Fleming

Pilot

A R Flores

Painter

Laura Flores

Costumes

David E Fluhr

Sound Re-Recording Mixer

Jeannie Ione Flynn

Key Costumer

Mark Forbes

Animal Wrangler

Michael Fossat

Stand-In

Aretha Franklin

Song Performer

Tim Gallin

Stunts

Gerald J Gates

Painter

Mickey Giacomazzi

Stunts

Hector Gika

Sound Effects Editor

Michael Glover

Song

Gerry Goffin

Song

Jane Goldsmith

Script Supervisor

Gloria Gresham

Costume Designer

Stacey Gunderson

Animal Trainer

Thomas L Gunderson

Animal Trainer

Teddy Haggarty

Stand-In

Bill Hansard

Projectionist

Melanie Hansen

Assistant

Marguerite Happy

Stunts

John Harajovic

Special Effects Assistant

Roy Hay

Song

Marie Healy

Assistant Location Manager

Dan Hegeman

Sound Effects Editor

Reginald Hendrix

Storyboard Artist

James F Henry

Props

Rafael Hernandez Marin

Song

Michael Herron

Video

David Hoberman

Producer

Chris Hogan

Dialogue Editor

Shane Toulouse Holliday

Best Boy Grip

Craig Hosking

Coordinator

Karyn L. Huston

Hair

Steve Indelicato

Production Assistant

Gregory Irwin

Assistant Camera

Noga Isackson

Assistant Director

Craig Jaeger

Foley Editor

William Jakielaszek

Special Effects Assistant

Milan Janicin

Camera Assistant

Danny Janssen

Song

Chris Jargo

Adr Editor

Will Jennings

Song

Randy Johnson

Boom Operator

John W Jones

Stunts

Will Jorgenson

Assistant Location Manager

Lawrence Karman

Steadicam Operator

Todd Kawecki

Production Assistant

Jamie Kehoe

Craft Service

Josh Kemble

Stunts

Parish Kennington

Costumer

Bill Kent

Visual Effects Supervisor

Rolfe Kent

Music Conductor

Rolfe Kent

Music

Richard Kerr

Song

Kevin Ketcham

Production Assistant

Nancy Jane King

Production Supervisor

Timber Kislan

Accountant

Barbara Anne Klein

Stunts

Tom Kramer

Music Editor

Micki Krimmel

Production Assistant

Thomas G Krueger

Medic

John C Kruize

Production Accountant

Kenneth Lafayette

Accounting Assistant

Mariann Lee

Extras Agent/Coordinator

Kevin Leffler

Editorial Production Assistant

Kevin Lefler

Editorial Production Assistant

Terry Leonard

Stunts

Fred M. Lerner

Stunts

Geoff Levin

Song

Gary Levy

Associate Producer

Dan Lewk

Associate Producer

Susan Lichtman

Costumer

Todd Lieberman

Executive Producer

Jason Liman

Production Assistant

Jun C Lin

Assistant Location Manager

John Lindley

Director Of Photography

Gary Littlejohn

Stunts

Jay Livingston

Theme Music

Chrys Lyras

Casting Assistant

Sasha Madzar

Props

Jenny Marchick

Assistant

Daniel Marcus

Assistant

Diane Marshall

Foley Artist

Kenny Marsten

Apprentice Editor

Michael Masser

Song

Ron Matthews

Special Effects Foreman

Jonas C. Matz

Medic

Adam Mccarthy

Location Scout

Brenda Mcnally

Hair

Johnny Mercer

Song

Ralph Merzbach

Video

Jim Meskimen

Song

Timothy Metivier

Assistant Camera

Sebastian Milito

Construction Coordinator

Timothy Miner

Production Assistant

Christian Minkler

Sound Re-Recording Mixer

Cheri Minns

Makeup

Jim Mitchell

Generator Operator

Scott Mizgaites

Props

Craig Molsberry

Best Boy Electric

Fleecie Moore

Song

Tom Morga

Stunts

Joe Morganella

Assistant

Robert Morgenroth

Video

Jon Moss

Song

David Mouton

Office Production Assistant

Anne Mulhall

Casting

Jeremy Mullen

Production Assistant

Matthew W. Mungle

Makeup Effects

Johnny Nash

Song

Jeff Nathanson

Screenplay

Otto Nemenz

Camera

Deborah Newhall

Costume Supervisor

Randy Newman

Song

Keith Nichols

Song

Sean Nightengale

Production Assistant

Hugh Aodh O'brien

Stunts

Louis Offer

Projectionist

Daniel R Owen

Special Effects Coordinator

Carl Paoli

Stunts

Anton Pardoe

Assistant Location Manager

Film Details

Also Known As
Last Shot, Providence
MPAA Rating
Release Date
2004
Distribution Company
Walt Disney Studios Distribution
Location
Rhode Island, USA; Los Angeles, California, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 33m

Articles

Pat Morita (1932-2005)


Pat Morita, the diminutive Asian-American actor who found lasting fame, and an Oscar® nomination, as Kesuke Miyagi, the janitor that teaches Ralph Macchio the fine art of karate in the hit film, The Karate Kid (1984), died on November 24 of natural causes in his Las Vegas home. He was 73.

He was born Noriyuki Morita on June 28, 1932 in Isleton, California. The son of migrant fruit pickers, he contracted spinal tuberculosis when he was two and spent the next nine years in a sanitarium run by Catholic priests near Sacramento. He was renamed Pat, and after several spinal surgical procedures and learning how to walk, the 11-year-old Morita was sent to an internment camp at Gila River, Arizona, joining his family and thousands of other Japanese-Americans who were shamefully imprisoned by the U.S. government after Japan’s attack on Pearl Harbor.

His family was released after the war, and Morita graduated from high school in Fairfield, California in 1950. He worked in his family's Chinese restaurant in Sacramento until his father was killed in a hit-and-run accident. He eventually found work as a data processor for the Department of Motor Vehicles and then Aerojet General Corporation before he decided to try his hand at stand-up comedy.

He relocated to San Francisco in 1962, where at first, there was some hesitation from clubs to book a Japanese-American comic, but Morita's enthusiasm soon warmed them over, and he was becoming something of a regional hit in all the Bay Area. His breakthrough came in 1964 when he was booked on ABC's The Hollywood Palace. The image of a small, unassuming Asian with the broad mannerisms and delivery of a modern American was something new in its day. He was a hit, and soon found more bookings on the show. And after he earned the nickname "the hip nip," he quickly began headlining clubs in Las Vegas and Los Angeles.

Morita's stage and television success eventually led him to films. He made his movie debut as "Oriental #2," the henchman to Beatrice Lilly in the Julie Andrew's musical Thoroughly Modern Millie (1967). Although his role, complete with thick coke-bottle glasses and gaping overbite, was a little hard to watch, it was the best he could do at the time. Subsequent parts, as in Don Knott's dreadful The Shakiest Gun in the West (1968); and Bob Hope's lamentable final film Cancel My Reservations (1972); were simply variations of the same stereotype.

However, television was far kinder to Morita. After some popular guest appearances in the early '70s on Rowan & Martin's Laugh-In, and The Tonight Show with Johnny Carson, Morita landed some semi-regular work. First, as the wisecracking, cigar chomping Captain Sam Pack on M.A.S.H. and as Ah Chew, the deadpan neighbor of Fred and Lamont Sanford in Sanford & Son. His success in these roles led to his first regular gig, as Arnold Takahashi in Happy Days. His stint as the owner of the soda shop where Ritchie Cunningham and the Fonz hung out for endless hours may have been short lived (just two seasons 1974-76), but it was Morita's first successful stab at pop immortality.

He left Happy Days to star in his own show, the critically savaged culture clash sitcom Mr. T and Tina that was canceled after just five episodes. Despite that setback, Morita rebounded that same year with his first dramatic performance, and a fine one at that, when he portrayed a Japanese-American internment camp survivor in the moving made for television drama Farewell to Manzanar (1976). After a few more guest appearances on hit shows (Magnum P.I., The Love Boat etc.), Morita found the goldmine and added new life to his career when he took the role of Miyagi in The Karate Kid (1984). Playing opposite Ralph Macchio, the young man who becomes his martial arts pupil, Morita was both touching and wise, and the warm bond he created with Macchio during the course of the film really proved that he had some serious acting chops. The flick was the surprise box-office hit of 1984, and Morita's career, if briefly, opened up to new possibilities.

He scored two parts in television specials that were notable in that his race was never referenced: first as the horse in Alice in Wonderland (1985); and as the toymaster in Babes in Toyland (1986). He also landed a detective show (with of course, comic undertones) that ran for two seasons Ohara (1987-89); nailed some funny lines in Honeymoon in Vegas (1992); was the sole saving grace of Gus Van Zandt's Even Cowgirls Get the Blues (1993); and starred in all of the sequels to The Karate Kid: The Karate Kid, Part II (1986), The Karate Kid, Part III (1989), and The Next Karate Kid (1994). Granted, it is arguable that Morita's career never truly blossomed out of the "wise old Asian man" caricature. But give the man his due, when it came to infusing such parts with sly wit and sheer charm, nobody did it better. Morita is survived by his wife, Evelyn; daughters, Erin, Aly and Tia; his brother, Harry, and two grandchildren.

by Michael T. Toole
Pat Morita (1932-2005)

Pat Morita (1932-2005)

Pat Morita, the diminutive Asian-American actor who found lasting fame, and an Oscar® nomination, as Kesuke Miyagi, the janitor that teaches Ralph Macchio the fine art of karate in the hit film, The Karate Kid (1984), died on November 24 of natural causes in his Las Vegas home. He was 73. He was born Noriyuki Morita on June 28, 1932 in Isleton, California. The son of migrant fruit pickers, he contracted spinal tuberculosis when he was two and spent the next nine years in a sanitarium run by Catholic priests near Sacramento. He was renamed Pat, and after several spinal surgical procedures and learning how to walk, the 11-year-old Morita was sent to an internment camp at Gila River, Arizona, joining his family and thousands of other Japanese-Americans who were shamefully imprisoned by the U.S. government after Japan’s attack on Pearl Harbor. His family was released after the war, and Morita graduated from high school in Fairfield, California in 1950. He worked in his family's Chinese restaurant in Sacramento until his father was killed in a hit-and-run accident. He eventually found work as a data processor for the Department of Motor Vehicles and then Aerojet General Corporation before he decided to try his hand at stand-up comedy. He relocated to San Francisco in 1962, where at first, there was some hesitation from clubs to book a Japanese-American comic, but Morita's enthusiasm soon warmed them over, and he was becoming something of a regional hit in all the Bay Area. His breakthrough came in 1964 when he was booked on ABC's The Hollywood Palace. The image of a small, unassuming Asian with the broad mannerisms and delivery of a modern American was something new in its day. He was a hit, and soon found more bookings on the show. And after he earned the nickname "the hip nip," he quickly began headlining clubs in Las Vegas and Los Angeles. Morita's stage and television success eventually led him to films. He made his movie debut as "Oriental #2," the henchman to Beatrice Lilly in the Julie Andrew's musical Thoroughly Modern Millie (1967). Although his role, complete with thick coke-bottle glasses and gaping overbite, was a little hard to watch, it was the best he could do at the time. Subsequent parts, as in Don Knott's dreadful The Shakiest Gun in the West (1968); and Bob Hope's lamentable final film Cancel My Reservations (1972); were simply variations of the same stereotype. However, television was far kinder to Morita. After some popular guest appearances in the early '70s on Rowan & Martin's Laugh-In, and The Tonight Show with Johnny Carson, Morita landed some semi-regular work. First, as the wisecracking, cigar chomping Captain Sam Pack on M.A.S.H. and as Ah Chew, the deadpan neighbor of Fred and Lamont Sanford in Sanford & Son. His success in these roles led to his first regular gig, as Arnold Takahashi in Happy Days. His stint as the owner of the soda shop where Ritchie Cunningham and the Fonz hung out for endless hours may have been short lived (just two seasons 1974-76), but it was Morita's first successful stab at pop immortality. He left Happy Days to star in his own show, the critically savaged culture clash sitcom Mr. T and Tina that was canceled after just five episodes. Despite that setback, Morita rebounded that same year with his first dramatic performance, and a fine one at that, when he portrayed a Japanese-American internment camp survivor in the moving made for television drama Farewell to Manzanar (1976). After a few more guest appearances on hit shows (Magnum P.I., The Love Boat etc.), Morita found the goldmine and added new life to his career when he took the role of Miyagi in The Karate Kid (1984). Playing opposite Ralph Macchio, the young man who becomes his martial arts pupil, Morita was both touching and wise, and the warm bond he created with Macchio during the course of the film really proved that he had some serious acting chops. The flick was the surprise box-office hit of 1984, and Morita's career, if briefly, opened up to new possibilities. He scored two parts in television specials that were notable in that his race was never referenced: first as the horse in Alice in Wonderland (1985); and as the toymaster in Babes in Toyland (1986). He also landed a detective show (with of course, comic undertones) that ran for two seasons Ohara (1987-89); nailed some funny lines in Honeymoon in Vegas (1992); was the sole saving grace of Gus Van Zandt's Even Cowgirls Get the Blues (1993); and starred in all of the sequels to The Karate Kid: The Karate Kid, Part II (1986), The Karate Kid, Part III (1989), and The Next Karate Kid (1994). Granted, it is arguable that Morita's career never truly blossomed out of the "wise old Asian man" caricature. But give the man his due, when it came to infusing such parts with sly wit and sheer charm, nobody did it better. Morita is survived by his wife, Evelyn; daughters, Erin, Aly and Tia; his brother, Harry, and two grandchildren. by Michael T. Toole

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Limited Release in United States September 24, 2004

Released in United States Fall September 24, 2004

Released in United States on Video May 10, 2005

Based on the Details Magazine article ""What's Wrong With This Picture?" by Steve Fishman.

Feature directorial debut for Jeff Nathanson.

Kodak

Released in United States on Video May 10, 2005

Limited Release in United States September 24, 2004

Released in United States Fall September 24, 2004