The Singing Kid


1h 25m 1936
The Singing Kid

Brief Synopsis

An egotistical singing star makes a talented kid his protege.

Film Details

Genre
Drama
Musical
Release Date
Apr 11, 1936
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
Distribution Company
Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
Country
United States

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 25m
Sound
Mono
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1
Film Length
10 reels

Synopsis

Al Jackson is a musical star whose generosity is well known. His lack of interest in money and busy schedule allow his lawyer, Robert Carey, to steal millions from him. Dana Lawrence, his fiancée, has also benefitted from Al's money and plans to repay him by running off with Bob. Al learns about their betrayal when the Internal Revenue Service demands payment of back taxes. That night Al loses his voice during his performance, and his doctor recommends a long trip to the country. Accompanied by his valet, Davenport Rogers, and his driver, Joe, Al drives to Maine where he has rented a cottage. They meet a small girl named Sybil and learn that she has been living in the house. While they are getting acquainted, Ruth Haines, the landlady, arrives. She and Sybil, her niece, had planned to move out before Al arrived, but forgetful Davenport had never sent a telegram announcing their arrival. Because it is a large house, Al insists that they stay. Sybil enchants everyone, and the men take turns entertaining her while Ruth finishes the play she has been writing for three years. Al sends the play to a producer friend, and when he rejects it, Al sends him the money to buy Ruth's play. Ruth is humiliated when she learns the truth and insists that Al leave the house immediately. In the meantime, refreshed by his time away, Al has gotten his voice back and rehearsals start for a new show. On opening night, a contrite Ruth arrives with Sybil to beg Al's forgiveness, but is turned away at the stage door. Meanwhile, Al is calling Maine to talk to her. After learning that she has left town, he rushes off to meet the train and runs into Ruth and Sybil in the cab. Al and Ruth reconcile, after which Al leads her and Sybil to aisle seats as he begins the show.

Film Details

Genre
Drama
Musical
Release Date
Apr 11, 1936
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
Distribution Company
Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
Country
United States

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 25m
Sound
Mono
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1
Film Length
10 reels

Quotes

Trivia

Notes

Screenwriter Patsy Flick was Al Jolson's personal gag writer. According to a news item in February 11, 1937 Hollywood Reporter, Sidney Marks sued Warner Bros. for $10,000, claiming that he was not paid for work that he did on the story. It has not been determined what was the extent of his contribution to the final story.