The Fisher King


2h 17m 1991
The Fisher King

Brief Synopsis

A DJ tries to help a homeless madman whose life he had unwittingly ruined.

Film Details

Also Known As
El rey pescador, Fisher King, Fisher King - Le roi pêcheur
MPAA Rating
Genre
Comedy
Romance
Drama
Fantasy
Release Date
1991
Production Company
Steve Scanlon
Distribution Company
TriStar Pictures
Location
New York City, New York, USA; Los Angeles, California, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
2h 17m

Synopsis

A callous New York radio talk show personality, who has inadvertently caused the death of a medieval history professor's wife, finds the widower down and out on the streets of Manhattan, and with his urging, embarks on a quest of redemption.

Crew

David Aaron

Assistant Property Master

Cyd Adams

Assistant Director

Dub Allbritten

Song

Chris Allies

Titles

Paul Anka

Song

Harold Arlen

Song

Paul Ary

Electrician

Jeff Atmajian

Original Music

Mark A Baker

Location Manager

Mark A Baker

Unit Manager Assistant

Patrick Shaun Bard

Grip

Benito Benitez

Song

Joseph Bird

Set Decorator

Larry Bird

Property Master

Roger Blauvelt

Best Boy

Stefna Borges

Assistant Sound Editor

Mel Bourne

Production Designer

Tristan Bourne

Production Assistant

Bill Bowling

Location Manager

Janet Brady

Stunts

Joseph Brennan

Boom Operator

David Brenner

Foreman

Greg Brickman

Stunts

Stephen W Bridgewater

Consultant

Tristan Brighty

Apprentice Editor

Jophery Brown

Stunts

Tullio Brunt

Assistant Editor

Neil S Buckhantz

Video Assist/Playback

Toni C

Song

Pierre Cailliarec

Production Assistant

John Cambria

Assistant Camera Operator

Todd Camhe

Production Assistant

Cindy Carr

Set Decorator

Paul Carr

Rerecording

Lloyd Catlett

Stunts

Thomas Causey

Sound Mixer

Ray Charles

Song Performer

Jeanne Chrzanowski

Other

Veronica Claypool

Accounting Assistant

John Clifford

Photography

Alishan Coker

Casting Associate

John Coltrane

Song Performer

Gil Combs

Stunts

Kenneth R Connors

Lighting Technician

Robert G Connors

Rigging Gaffer

Ray Cooper

Song

Ray Cooper

Music

Pete Corby

Stunts

Pam Cornfeld

Production Coordinator

Carla Corwin

Assistant Director

Jeff Dashnaw

Stunts

R. Michael De Chellis

Lighting Technician

Dennis Dion

Special Effects Supervisor

Edward Drohan

Special Effects Supervisor

Andy Duppin

Stunts

Marty Eichmann

Key Grip

Zoltan Elek

Makeup Artist

Jonathan T Ercole

Assistant Camera Operator

Robert Farr

Rerecording

George Fenton

Song

George Fenton

Music

Giovanni Ferrara

Other

Ed Ferraro

Construction Coordinator

Howard Feuer

Casting

Jimmy Finnerty

Grip

Robert Frazier

Song

Ralph Freed

Song

John K Fundus

Boom Operator

Mark Galley

Production Assistant

Lawrence P Ganem

Assistant Location Manager

John Garrett

Song

Antonio Garrido

Dolly Grip

Patrick D Garrison

Production Assistant

Maureen Garvey

Production Assistant

J B Getzwiller

Stunts

Valencia Giacco

Assistant

Mary C Gierczak

Costumes

Dale Gordon

Props

Mack Gordon

Song

Keith Grant

Music

Keith Greco

Costume Designer

Johnny L Gutierrez

Rigging Gaffer

Craig Haagensen

Camera Operator

E. Y. Harburg

Song

Anne Harmon

Art Assistant

Peter Harvey

Song

Rick Heinrichs

Set Designer

Debra Hill

Producer

Bonnie Hock

Stunts

Robin Horness

Choreographer

Chris Howell

Stunt Coordinator

Jeremy Hume

Assistant Editor

Joie Hutchinson

Costume Supervisor

Stephen V Isbell

Grip

Sharre Jacoby

Post-Production Supervisor

Mark James

Song

Vincent Jefferds

Costume Designer

Thomas Jirgal

Grip

P. Michael Johnston

Art Director

T R Jones

Production Assistant

Rainer Judd

Wardrobe Assistant

Kathleen R Kelly

Production Assistant

Rikke Kesten

Stunts

Travis Keyes

Production Assistant

Richard Kite

Boom Operator

Ron Kunecke

Other

Richard Lagravenese

Screenplay

Barbara Lampson

Production Assistant

Burton Lane

Song

Kevin Lane

Song

Kevin Lane

Music Editor

Maurice E Larson

Other

Brenda Lee

Song Performer

Timothy C Lee

Production Assistant

John Leonidas

Transportation Captain

Mark J Levenstein

Assistant Production Accountant

Amy Love

Production Assistant

Craig Lyman

Makeup Artist

James R Maceo

Assistant Location Manager

Richard Mader

Video Assist/Playback

Harry Madsen

Stunts

Steve Maguire

Foley

Dennis Maitland

Sound Mixer

Jason Mark

Production Assistant

Tony Mark

Unit Production Manager

Tony Mark

Associate Producer

Ann F Markel

Assistant Location Manager

Jackie Martin

Production Coordinator

Nicholas J. Masuraca

Assistant Camera Operator

Percy Mayfield

Song

Gary Mccarthy

Accounting Assistant

Kevin Mccarthy

Set Decorator

Robert E Mccarthy

Consultant

Thomas A Mcdermott

Assistant Property Master

David Mcgiffert

Assistant Director

Andrew Melhuish

Sound Editor

Lisa Meyers

Hair Stylist

Michael Wayne Miller

Key Grip

Nicole Miller

Production Assistant

Robert Miller

Grip

Margaret A Mitchell

Production Accountant

Bennie Moore

Stunts

Joe Napolitano

Assistant Director

Andrew M Nelson

Rigging Gaffer

Harry Nilsson

Song Performer

Gerry O'riordan

Music

Lynda Obst

Producer

Alan Paley

Dialogue Editor

Beatrix Aruna Pasztor

Costume Designer

Peter Pennell

Sound Editor

Desiree Perri

Assistant Production Accountant

Marge Piane

Dga Trainee

James Plannette

Lighting Technician

Cynthia A Potthast

Assistant Director

Roger Pratt

Director Of Photography

Richard Dean Rankin

Construction Coordinator

Mark L Rhodes

Location Manager

Bob Risk

Foley Editor

James W Roberts

Transportation Captain

Barry Rosenbush

Other

Carrie Rudolf

Production Assistant

John Rybacki

Production Assistant

Rebecca Saionz

Dga Trainee

Cave Samrai

Song

Steve Scanlon

Cable Operator

Ronnie Self

Song

Jessica Sher

Art Department

Stacey Sher

Associate Producer

Sy Sher

Art Department

Sharyn Shimada-huggins

Other

Manuel Silvia

Production

Simon Smart

Music

Ellie Smith

Production Assistant

Stephen Sondheim

Song

Edward Stabile

Assistant Editor

Randy Starck

Assistant

Julie Stone

Stunts

Jule Styne

Song

Daniel Sudick

Special Effects

Linda Louise Taylor

Costumes

William J Taylor

Grip

Yvette Taylor

Assistant

Jonny Templeton

Song

Todd Thaler

Extras Agent/Coordinator

Adrian Thomas

Other

Tara Timpone

Assistant Editor

Marion Tumen

Script Supervisor

Stephen Vaughan

Photography

Michael Viglietta

Production Assistant

Eddie Lee Voelker

Transportation Coordinator

Lesley Walker

Editor

Greg Walters

Assistant Camera Operator

Harry Warren

Song

Carmen B Weets

Assistant

Jason Weil

Set Designer

Ann Weiss-lagravenese

Assistant

Chuck Whelan

Assistant Camera Operator

Douglas J White

Animal Services

Marsha Williams

Assistant

Paul D. Williams

Grip

Videos

Movie Clip

Fisher King, The (1991) - Thank God I'm Me The opening from director Terry Gilliam and from Richard LaGravanese’s original screenplay, Jeff Bridges as New York shock-jock Jack Lucas, his caller Edwin (Christian Clemenson) providing a critical plot point, in The Fisher King, 1991, with Robin Williams and Mercedes Ruehl.
Fisher King, The (1991) - Forgive Me! Egotistical New York radio shock jock Jack (Jeff Bridges) in his apartment preparing for his TV sitcom audition when he learns, from a TV reporter (Frazer Smith) that his caller “Edwin,” whom he’s encouraged to hate “yuppies,” has become a mass murderer, in Terry Gilliam’s The Fisher King, 1991.
Fisher King, The (1991) - I Do Believe In Fairies Depressed former radio shock jock Jack (Jeff Bridges), thinking about throwing himself from the Manhattan Bridge, is attacked by thugs (Jayce Bartok, Dan Futterman), then rescued by profane Parry (Robin Williams, his first scene) and his homeless band, in Terry Gilliam’s The Fisher King, 1991.
Fisher King, The (1991) - Jesus' Juice Glass A feature scene for Mercedes Ruehl in her Academy Award-nominated role, as Anne, employer and girlfriend of former radio star Jack (Jeff Bridges), who’s wondering about the Holy Grail after meeting a visionary vagrant (Robin Williams, not seen), in Terry Gilliam’s The Fisher King, 1991.
Fisher King, The (1991) - She Loves Dumplings Ex-radio shock jock Jack (Jeff Bridges), having learned that his rants led to the murder of the wife of homeless Parry (Robin Williams), finds him around Park Ave. and East 24th in Manhattan, where he turns out to be observing Lydia (Amanda Plummer), in Terry Gilliam’s The Fisher King, 1991.

Film Details

Also Known As
El rey pescador, Fisher King, Fisher King - Le roi pêcheur
MPAA Rating
Genre
Comedy
Romance
Drama
Fantasy
Release Date
1991
Production Company
Steve Scanlon
Distribution Company
TriStar Pictures
Location
New York City, New York, USA; Los Angeles, California, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
2h 17m

Award Wins

Best Supporting Actress

1991
Mercedes Ruehl

Award Nominations

Best Actor

1991
Robin Williams

Best Art Direction

1991
Mel Bourne

Best Original Screenplay

1991

Best Score

1991

Articles

The Fisher King


Shortly after Robin Williams' suicide in August 2014, Terry Gilliam took another look at this movie, in which he directed Williams, and found an eerie significance. In the film, Williams' character is a tortured soul who creates in his mind the threatening figure of the Red Knight, a specter who relentlessly pursues him through the city, paralleling what we now know of the actor's struggle with his own inner torments.

"I didn't have to push him because he believed that was true," Gilliam told the Hollywood Reporter. "He knew the darker side and what it means to have demons." It was that aspect of Williams, unknown to the general public until the actor took his own life, that Gilliam says transformed the scenes from cartoonish and "cutesy" on the page to something much darker. The director agrees with many critics that this was one of Williams' finest and most full-bodied performances, ranging from the "hysterically funny to the manic to the utterly sweet to the sensitive and tormented, it's all there."

Williams plays Parry, a former college professor now homeless after becoming deranged following the death of his wife in a mass killing at a popular New York restaurant. He's befriended by Jack Lucas (Jeff Bridges, also turning in an outstanding performance), a depressed radio talk show host (said to be based on Howard Stern) whose flippant on-air comments may have spurred the killer to his brutal act. Jack hopes to redeem himself by helping Parry in a mythic quest to recover the Holy Grail and win the heart of a shy, awkward young woman.

Gilliam, working with an imaginative script by Richard LaGravenese (the first time the director had not been involved in the writing of one of his films), made the most of the mythic and fairy-tale aspects of the story. In Arthurian mythology, the Fisher King is the guardian of the Holy Grail, the cup believed to have been used by Jesus at the Last Supper and to collect drops of his blood at the Crucifixion. There are variations on the legend, but the Fisher King is almost always depicted as wounded and, by implication, impotent, which brings barrenness to his kingdom. He and his land can only be healed by the completion of a heroic task performed by one who is pure and innocent. In this story, Parry (as in the Arthurian Parsifal) is the mythic figure bringing life and hope back into the world. Gilliam has said that Jack, the former radio host, is really the Fisher King who has lost his purpose and direction in life.

Gilliam shot the exteriors in New York City (interiors in Los Angeles), using locations that were, with the exception of the Central Park scenes, "heavy, stone, monumental...as in a fairy tale. In my mind I was making a fairy tale of people like Lydia imprisoned in this great stone tower working in this publishing house and bums living under the arches of Manhattan Bridge in a setting that's Dante-esque. ... I put Jack Lucas, who's actually the Fisher King, up in the most minimalistic, severe, cold building I could find." Gilliam was helped tremendously in getting the look he wanted by two key members of his creative team. Cinematographer Roger Pratt knew a thing or two about fantasy settings and epic, magical tales having shot Batman (1989), Gilliam's retro-futuristic Brazil (1985), the "Crimson Permanent Assurance" (pirate) segment of the Gilliam co-directed Monty Python film The Meaning of Life (1983), and several segments of the 1991 television miniseries The Storyteller: Greek Myths. Pratt went on to shoot Troy (2004) and two of the Harry Potter film series.

Production designer Mel Bourne was a master of New York location work, a skill he brought to seven Woody Allen films. He also designed The Natural (1984), a baseball film that is said to have references to the legend of the Fisher King.

One of the picture's most fairytale-like locations is the fictional Fifth Avenue townhouse of the character Langdon Carmichael, played by Bourne himself, a "castle" that Parry imagines houses the Holy Grail. The structure is actually the Armory at 94th Street and Madison Avenue. The production team heightened its mythic look by adding stained glass windows and gargoyles to the façade, as well as an elaborate entryway and double staircase Bourne had constructed in California and shipped to New York.

One of the film's most iconic and lyrical scenes was not in the script at all but an invention of Gilliam's. In LaGravenese's version, Parry and Lydia (Amanda Plummer) meet in a crowded subway train transfixed by the beautiful singing of a homeless woman. Gilliam changed that to a waltz between the two characters in Grand Central Station at rush hour, with hundreds of commuters pairing up and dancing along with the couple. The production was given the use of the station from nighttime until early in the morning. The scene incorporated 400 extras.

The mythic aspect was also boosted by the inclusion of another figure from the King Arthur legends, the Red Knight, here a representation of Parry's grief, loss, and horror over witnessing the bloody death of his wife. Astride a huge steed, the figure appears to be burning from within as he follows Parry around the city and terrorizes him. The Red Knight's frightening armor was made from foam and latex, dressed in yards of fabric. Inside, stunt performer Chris Howell carried a flame thrower that shot fire from his helmet. Two large white circus horses weighing around a ton each were made up daily with vegetable-based, non-toxic paints under strict supervision by the ASPCA.

The Fisher King did well at the box office and received favorable reviews. Mercedes Ruehl won a Best Supporting Actress Academy Award for her role as the sympathetic video store owner who cares for Bridges. Williams was nominated for Best Actor for the third time and won a Golden Globe for Best Actor in a Musical or Comedy. Bridges was nominated in the same category, and Gilliam got a Golden Globe nod for Best Director. The film also received Oscar nominations for art direction-set decoration, original score, and original screenplay. Ruehl won four other supporting actress awards, and the film got several other awards and nominations by various festivals and film boards, including a Silver Lion for Gilliam at the Venice Film Festival.

Director: Terry Gilliam
Producers: Debra Hill, Lynda Obst
Screenplay: Richard LaGravenese
Cinematography: Roger Pratt
Editing: Lesley Walker
Production Design: Mel Bourne
Art Direction/Set Decoration: P. Michael Johnston/Cindy Carr Original Music: George Fenton
Cast: Jeff Bridges (Jack Lucas), Robin Williams (Parry), Mercedes Ruehl (Anne), Amanda Plummer (Lydia Sinclair), Michael Jeter (Cabaret Singer)

By Rob Nixon
The Fisher King

The Fisher King

Shortly after Robin Williams' suicide in August 2014, Terry Gilliam took another look at this movie, in which he directed Williams, and found an eerie significance. In the film, Williams' character is a tortured soul who creates in his mind the threatening figure of the Red Knight, a specter who relentlessly pursues him through the city, paralleling what we now know of the actor's struggle with his own inner torments. "I didn't have to push him because he believed that was true," Gilliam told the Hollywood Reporter. "He knew the darker side and what it means to have demons." It was that aspect of Williams, unknown to the general public until the actor took his own life, that Gilliam says transformed the scenes from cartoonish and "cutesy" on the page to something much darker. The director agrees with many critics that this was one of Williams' finest and most full-bodied performances, ranging from the "hysterically funny to the manic to the utterly sweet to the sensitive and tormented, it's all there." Williams plays Parry, a former college professor now homeless after becoming deranged following the death of his wife in a mass killing at a popular New York restaurant. He's befriended by Jack Lucas (Jeff Bridges, also turning in an outstanding performance), a depressed radio talk show host (said to be based on Howard Stern) whose flippant on-air comments may have spurred the killer to his brutal act. Jack hopes to redeem himself by helping Parry in a mythic quest to recover the Holy Grail and win the heart of a shy, awkward young woman. Gilliam, working with an imaginative script by Richard LaGravenese (the first time the director had not been involved in the writing of one of his films), made the most of the mythic and fairy-tale aspects of the story. In Arthurian mythology, the Fisher King is the guardian of the Holy Grail, the cup believed to have been used by Jesus at the Last Supper and to collect drops of his blood at the Crucifixion. There are variations on the legend, but the Fisher King is almost always depicted as wounded and, by implication, impotent, which brings barrenness to his kingdom. He and his land can only be healed by the completion of a heroic task performed by one who is pure and innocent. In this story, Parry (as in the Arthurian Parsifal) is the mythic figure bringing life and hope back into the world. Gilliam has said that Jack, the former radio host, is really the Fisher King who has lost his purpose and direction in life. Gilliam shot the exteriors in New York City (interiors in Los Angeles), using locations that were, with the exception of the Central Park scenes, "heavy, stone, monumental...as in a fairy tale. In my mind I was making a fairy tale of people like Lydia imprisoned in this great stone tower working in this publishing house and bums living under the arches of Manhattan Bridge in a setting that's Dante-esque. ... I put Jack Lucas, who's actually the Fisher King, up in the most minimalistic, severe, cold building I could find." Gilliam was helped tremendously in getting the look he wanted by two key members of his creative team. Cinematographer Roger Pratt knew a thing or two about fantasy settings and epic, magical tales having shot Batman (1989), Gilliam's retro-futuristic Brazil (1985), the "Crimson Permanent Assurance" (pirate) segment of the Gilliam co-directed Monty Python film The Meaning of Life (1983), and several segments of the 1991 television miniseries The Storyteller: Greek Myths. Pratt went on to shoot Troy (2004) and two of the Harry Potter film series. Production designer Mel Bourne was a master of New York location work, a skill he brought to seven Woody Allen films. He also designed The Natural (1984), a baseball film that is said to have references to the legend of the Fisher King. One of the picture's most fairytale-like locations is the fictional Fifth Avenue townhouse of the character Langdon Carmichael, played by Bourne himself, a "castle" that Parry imagines houses the Holy Grail. The structure is actually the Armory at 94th Street and Madison Avenue. The production team heightened its mythic look by adding stained glass windows and gargoyles to the façade, as well as an elaborate entryway and double staircase Bourne had constructed in California and shipped to New York. One of the film's most iconic and lyrical scenes was not in the script at all but an invention of Gilliam's. In LaGravenese's version, Parry and Lydia (Amanda Plummer) meet in a crowded subway train transfixed by the beautiful singing of a homeless woman. Gilliam changed that to a waltz between the two characters in Grand Central Station at rush hour, with hundreds of commuters pairing up and dancing along with the couple. The production was given the use of the station from nighttime until early in the morning. The scene incorporated 400 extras. The mythic aspect was also boosted by the inclusion of another figure from the King Arthur legends, the Red Knight, here a representation of Parry's grief, loss, and horror over witnessing the bloody death of his wife. Astride a huge steed, the figure appears to be burning from within as he follows Parry around the city and terrorizes him. The Red Knight's frightening armor was made from foam and latex, dressed in yards of fabric. Inside, stunt performer Chris Howell carried a flame thrower that shot fire from his helmet. Two large white circus horses weighing around a ton each were made up daily with vegetable-based, non-toxic paints under strict supervision by the ASPCA. The Fisher King did well at the box office and received favorable reviews. Mercedes Ruehl won a Best Supporting Actress Academy Award for her role as the sympathetic video store owner who cares for Bridges. Williams was nominated for Best Actor for the third time and won a Golden Globe for Best Actor in a Musical or Comedy. Bridges was nominated in the same category, and Gilliam got a Golden Globe nod for Best Director. The film also received Oscar nominations for art direction-set decoration, original score, and original screenplay. Ruehl won four other supporting actress awards, and the film got several other awards and nominations by various festivals and film boards, including a Silver Lion for Gilliam at the Venice Film Festival. Director: Terry Gilliam Producers: Debra Hill, Lynda Obst Screenplay: Richard LaGravenese Cinematography: Roger Pratt Editing: Lesley Walker Production Design: Mel Bourne Art Direction/Set Decoration: P. Michael Johnston/Cindy Carr Original Music: George Fenton Cast: Jeff Bridges (Jack Lucas), Robin Williams (Parry), Mercedes Ruehl (Anne), Amanda Plummer (Lydia Sinclair), Michael Jeter (Cabaret Singer) By Rob Nixon

Michael Jeter, 1952-2003


Michael Jeter, the diminutive actor whose versatility in all mediums earned him numerous accolades and awards, was found dead on March 30 in his Hollywood Hills home. He was 50. The cause of death has not been determined, although in a 1997 interview for Entertainment Tonight Jeter did disclose he was HIV-positive.

Jeter was born on Aug. 26, 1952, in Lawrenceburg, Tennessee. He began medical studies at Memphis State University, but soon discovered a love for the theater. After graduation, he pursued his career in earnest and moved to New York and worked as a law firm secretary until he found some stage work and his film debut in Milos Forman's adaptation of the musical Hair (1979).

Jeter spend the next decade landing mostly stage work and making occasional guest forays in popular television shows: Lou Grant, Night Court, and Designing Women, but his unique physical presence (a slight, 5'4" frame, premature balding, owlish features) made it difficult for him to land substantial parts. That all changed when Tommy Tune cast him in the Broadway hit Grand Hotel (1990) in the role of Otto Kringelin, a dying clerk enjoying a last fling in Berlin. Jeter's energetic performance earned him a Tony award and gave him a much higher profile to stake a claim in movies. The following year he made his strongest impression on film to date when he was cast in Terry Gilliam's (1991) delivering a moving performance as a homeless cabaret singer with AIDS.

He scored his biggest coup when he was cast the same year in the hit sitcom Evening Shade (1991-1994) as Herman Stiles, the wimpy assistant to Reynolds, who played a pro football player turned coach. He won an Emmy award in 1992 for that role and scored two more nominations by the end of the series run. Jeter would also get some good supporting parts in many films throughout the decade: Sister Act 2 (1993), a fun comic role as Whoopi Goldberg's sidekick Father Ignatius; Mouse Hunt (1997); The Green Mile (1999), his best film role as Eduard Delacroix, a condemned murderer who befriends a cellblock mouse; Jurassic Park III (2001); and Welcome to Collinwood (2002).

At the time of his death, Jeter was appearing on the classic PBS children's series Sesame Street as the lovable but bumbling Mr. Noodle; and had been filming Robert Zemekis' Christmas movie The Polar Express starring Tom Hanks. Production was halted on Monday in observance of Jeter's death. He is survived by his life partner, Sean Blue, his parents, Dr. William and Virginia Jeter; a brother, William; and four sisters, Virginia Anne Barham, Emily Jeter, Amanda Parsons and Laurie Wicker.

by Michael T. Toole

Michael Jeter, 1952-2003

Michael Jeter, the diminutive actor whose versatility in all mediums earned him numerous accolades and awards, was found dead on March 30 in his Hollywood Hills home. He was 50. The cause of death has not been determined, although in a 1997 interview for Entertainment Tonight Jeter did disclose he was HIV-positive. Jeter was born on Aug. 26, 1952, in Lawrenceburg, Tennessee. He began medical studies at Memphis State University, but soon discovered a love for the theater. After graduation, he pursued his career in earnest and moved to New York and worked as a law firm secretary until he found some stage work and his film debut in Milos Forman's adaptation of the musical Hair (1979). Jeter spend the next decade landing mostly stage work and making occasional guest forays in popular television shows: Lou Grant, Night Court, and Designing Women, but his unique physical presence (a slight, 5'4" frame, premature balding, owlish features) made it difficult for him to land substantial parts. That all changed when Tommy Tune cast him in the Broadway hit Grand Hotel (1990) in the role of Otto Kringelin, a dying clerk enjoying a last fling in Berlin. Jeter's energetic performance earned him a Tony award and gave him a much higher profile to stake a claim in movies. The following year he made his strongest impression on film to date when he was cast in Terry Gilliam's

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States Fall September 20, 1991

Wide Release in United States September 27, 1991

Released in United States on Video March 25, 1992

Released in United States 1991

Released in United States August 1991

Released in United States September 1991

Released in United States September 16, 1991

Released in United States January 1996

Released in United States 2007

Shown at Deauville Film Festival August 30 - September 9, 1991.

Shared the Silver Lion award with "J'entends Plus la Guitar" (France/1991) and "Dehong Dengiong Gaogao Gua/Raise the Red Lantern" (China/1991) at the 1991 Venice Film Festival.

Shown at Norwegian Film Festival in Haugesund August 18-24, 1991.

Shown at Toronto Festival of Festivals, September 5-14, 1991.

Shown at Venice Film Festival (in competition) September 3-14, 1991.

Shown at Boston Film Festival September 9-19, 1991.

Shown at benefit premiere in Los Angeles September 16, 1991 for Comic Relief and the End Hunger Network.

Shown at San Francisco International Film Festival (Tributes) April 26-May 10, 2007.

Mercedes Ruehl received the Academy Award for best supporting actress (1991).

Received the People's Choice award for most popular film at the 1991 Toronto Festival of Festivals.

Robin Williams and Mercedes Ruehl received Golden Globe (1991) awards for Best Actor (Comedy or Musical) and Best Supporting Actress from the Hollywood Foreign Press Association.

Completed shooting August 16, 1990.

Began shooting May 21, 1990.

Released in United States Fall September 20, 1991

Wide Release in United States September 27, 1991

Released in United States on Video March 25, 1992

Released in United States 1991 (Shown at Deauville Film Festival August 30 - September 9, 1991.)

Released in United States 1991 (Shared the Silver Lion award with "J'entends Plus la Guitar" (France/1991) and "Dehong Dengiong Gaogao Gua/Raise the Red Lantern" (China/1991) at the 1991 Venice Film Festival.)

Released in United States August 1991 (Shown at Norwegian Film Festival in Haugesund August 18-24, 1991.)

Released in United States September 1991 (Shown at Toronto Festival of Festivals, September 5-14, 1991.)

Released in United States September 1991 (Shown at Venice Film Festival (in competition) September 3-14, 1991.)

Released in United States September 1991 (Shown at Boston Film Festival September 9-19, 1991.)

Released in United States September 16, 1991 (Shown at benefit premiere in Los Angeles September 16, 1991 for Comic Relief and the End Hunger Network.)

Released in United States January 1996 (Shown in New York City (American Museum of the Moving Image) as part of program "Fairy Tales For Adults: A Terry Gilliam Retrospective" January 6-21, 1996.)

Released in United States 2007 (Shown at San Francisco International Film Festival (Tributes) April 26-May 10, 2007.)