Bud Abbott and Lou Costello in Hollywood


1h 23m 1945
Bud Abbott and Lou Costello in Hollywood

Brief Synopsis

A pair of wacky lackeys try to take Tinseltown by storm.

Film Details

Also Known As
Abbott and Costello in Hollywood, Close Shave
Genre
Comedy
Release Date
Oct 1945
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Corp.
Distribution Company
Loew's Inc.
Country
United States

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 23m
Sound
Mono
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1
Film Length
7,423ft (8 reels)

Synopsis

At the busy Hollywood Shop, the "barber shop to the stars," seasoned barber Buzz Kurtis tries to teach his clumsy pal Abercrombie how to shave customers. Abercrombie practices on an air-filled balloon covered with shaving cream, which explodes in his face when he loses control of the razor. Later, at the office of motion picture agent Norman Royce, Buzz and Abercrombie are in the middle of giving the agent a shave and a shoeshine when Jeff Parker, a singer from Des Moines, arrives looking for an agent to represent him. Impressed by Jeff's singing, Norman decides to recommend him for the romantic lead opposite Claire Warren in director Dennis Kavanaugh's next picture. Leading man Gregory LeMaise was to star in the film, but gave up the part and canceled his contract with Norman. The seeming ease with which Norman makes lucrative movie deals persuades Buzz and Abercrombie to become agents themselves, and they begin by convincing Jeff that he should be their first client. A short time later, at the main entrance to Mammoth Studios, Buzz and Abercrombie accidentally crash their car into Kavanaugh's car and are ordered off the lot. While Kavanaugh signs Jeff to star in his new film, Buzz and Abercrombie try to elude the studio police long enough to find Kavanaugh. Later, to celebrate Jeff's new contract, Kavanaugh, Buzz and Abercrombie take the new star to Ciro's nightclub. There Gregory tells Kavanaugh that he has changed his mind and has decided to resume his role in the film. Kavanaugh, not wanting to take a risk on Jeff, takes Gregory back and cancels his contract with Jeff. Claire, who has fallen in love with Jeff, vows to fight Kavanaugh's decision, but Jeff tells her that he has decided to give up his attempt to break into show business and that he will be returning to Des Moines. Desperate to keep their client from leaving Hollywood, Buzz and Abercrombie decide to prevent Gregory from appearing in the film by devising a plan to get the actor arrested. As part of their plan, Buzz and Abercrombie board the actor's boat and provoke him into committing an assault against Abercrombie. Gregory punches Abercrombie so hard, though, that he is propelled into the water. Although Abercrombie swims back to shore, Buzz tells him to hide so that he can accuse Gregory of murder. When Buzz threatens to go to the police, Gregory drops out of sight and is labeled a fugitive by the press. Later, at a bar, Gregory discovers that Abercrombie is alive and chases after him. The chase continues through the amusement park set of Kavanaugh's film, and their ensuing wild roller coaster ride is captured on film. Although the chase adds just the right amount of excitement to the film to make it a hit, Abercrombie and Buzz soon find themselves back at their old jobs at the barber shop.

Cast

Bud Abbott

Buzz Kurtis

Lou Costello

Abercrombie

Frances Rafferty

Claire Warren

Robert Stanton

Jeff Parker

Jean Porter

Ruthie

Warner Anderson

Norman Royce

"rags" Ragland

Himself

Mike Mazurki

Klondike Pete

Carleton G. Young

Gregory LeMaise

Donald Macbride

Dennis Kavanaugh

Edgar Dearing

First studio cop

Marion Martin

Miss Milbane

Arthur Space

Director

Wm. "bill" Phillips

Kavanaugh's assistant

Robert E. O'connor

Studio cop

Katharine Booth

Louise

The Lyttle Sisters

Quartette specialty

Dean Stockwell

Himself

Sharon Mcmanus

Herself

Lucille Ball

Herself

Jackie "butch" Jenkins

Himself

Preston Foster

Himself

Robert Z. Leonard

Film director

Chester Clute

Mr. Burvis

Marie Blake

Secretary

Wheaton Chambers

Pedestrian

Harry Tyler

Taxi driver

William Tannen

Hard-boiled assistant/Dr. Snide's voice

Skeets Noyes

Wardrobe man

Nolan Leary

Assistant

Garry Owen

Assistant

Forbes Murray

George Washington

Ed O'neill

Abe Lincoln

Joe Bacon

Nubian slave

Dick Alexander

Props man

Hank Worden

Gangling guy

Dick Winslow

Orchestra leader

Jane Hale

Cigarette girl

Mitzie Uehlein

Cigarette girl

Nita Matthews

Cigarette girl

Frank Scannell

Waiter

William Hawley

Waiter

Arno Frey

Waiter

Helen Boice

Richly dressed woman

King Baggott

Patron

William Frambes

Busboy

Betty Blythe

Mrs. Murdock

Broderick O'farrell

Man at table

George Calliga

Maitre d'

Lee Phelps

House detective

Walter Soderling

Hotel manager

Frank Penny

Night clerk

Frank Darien

Tenant

Henry Hall

Tenant

Bert Roach

Cop

Frank Hagney

Cop

Clancy Cooper

Cop

Nick "nicodemus" Stewart

Black houseboy

Milton Kibbee

Counterman

Joe Devlin

Kelly

Del Henderson

Benson

Harold Degarro

Stilt walker

Chester Conklin

Yokel

Charles Walters

Sailor

Art Miles

Bull neck giant

Beverly Haney

Manicurist

Barbara Combs

Manicurist

Zaz Vorka

Manicurist

Mary Donovan

Manicurist

Charles Mcnally

Barker

Gerald Perreau

Little boy with horn

Bunny Waters

Sarah Edwards

Anne O'neal

Film Details

Also Known As
Abbott and Costello in Hollywood, Close Shave
Genre
Comedy
Release Date
Oct 1945
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Corp.
Distribution Company
Loew's Inc.
Country
United States

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 23m
Sound
Mono
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1
Film Length
7,423ft (8 reels)

Articles

Classic Comedy Teams Collection - Abbott & Costello, Laurel and Hardy and The Three Stooges Are Featured in CLASSIC COMEDY TEAMS COLLECTION


We've seen a steady stream of older films coming out on DVD but all you have to do is poke any film buff to hear about the classics that have yet to appear. Poke twice and you can also hear about the missing fan favorites, the ones that will never make any "best of" list but still hold a special place for some viewer or maybe just a final notch for a completist. Despite its title, the Classic Comedy Teams Collection is aimed more at the fans. Abbott and Costello, Laurel and Hardy and the Three Stooges each get a disc with two of their films. None are the best place to become acquainted with any of these teams but all films are new to DVD and if they aren't masterpieces at least they're mostly entertaining.

The Abbott and Costello disc is easily the strongest. The duo was allowed to make one film a year away from their home studio of Universal so during the peak of their popularity they went three times to MGM. Two of those films are in this set and can't be found in the otherwise comprehensive four volume Best of Abbott & Costello (the third film, 1941's Rio Rita, has yet to appear on DVD). Lost in a Harem (1944) shows more of the MGM gloss than Abbott & Costello's usual films even if the story about the two rescuing a blonde singer (B-movie perennial Marilyn Maxwell) and overthrowing an evil ruler is a bit thin. The film makes good use of sets left over from Kismet and there's a song and a half from the Jimmy Dorsey band. Abbott and Costello are generally quite lively with a mix of slapstick and verbal routines, even at one point recreating the classic vaudeville bit "Slowly I Turned." Slightly more predictable is Abbott and Costello in Hollywood (1945), the first film to feature their name in the title. This time the two are show biz barbers who decide that being a talent agent is the ticket to easy money so they promote an Iowa-fresh singer over an established star. The film tends more towards a string of routines though there are some good ones including the two trying to cure Costello's insomnia, him pretending to be a stunt dummy and even a frantic chase at the end. The big missed opportunity was to exploit the Hollywood setting more; there are cameos from Lucille Ball, Rags Ragland and Preston Foster but that's about it.

Like Abbott and Costello, the Laurel and Hardy disc collects two MGM wartime films but in this case that's a bit past their prime period. Still, Laurel and Hardy bring unflappable good cheer and years of experience that give these films a charm that would certainly have been lacking if anybody else had starred. Air Raid Wardens (1943) opens with a voice-over straight out of Our Town, describing the small community that's about to participate in the war. Laurel and Hardy ran a string of failed businesses and now have been rejected by the military as well they end up as, you guessed it, air raid wardens. Not much to the warden angle so we also get Nazi spies, a stuffy bank president, a short-tempered teamster and even a rambunctious stray dog. There's a nice bit with the two trying to enter a town meeting quietly and an inventive gag with a carrier pigeon. Nothing But Trouble (1944) stretches everything a bit more thin. Seems that there's an exiled teenage king from some operetta country who just want to be a regular boy and play football. Laurel and Hardy befriend him, thinking he's just a wayward kid but not much happens. The film had been pitched a couple of years earlier and at one point involved helicopters and gags by Buster Keaton. None of that is in the final film; the studio must have decided that "Imagine Laurel and Hardy as a chef and a butler" was good enough and less expensive. Though the king's story is mostly padding, you're not likely to forget Stan trying to serve at a high-class dinner party and may even have fond memories of the two trying to grab a steak (actually horsemeat) from the lion's cage at the zoo.

The Three Stooges disc is something of an oddity since the team plays only supporting roles in both films. Meet the Baron (1933) is the more interesting since it's an example of the goofy, anything-goes comedies of the early 30s though admittedly not one of the better ones. The film was designed to put onto screen Jack Pearl, whose recreation of eternal tall tale teller Baron Munchausen had been a radio and stage smash in preceeding years (and would quickly vanish: he appeared in only one other film while his radio career trickled out). With Jimmy Durante as his buddy, the Baron crashes an all-girls college where the janitors are Ted Healey and His Stooges (that's right, not yet the Three Stooges). So you get a lot of running around, recreations of Pearl's radio skits, the Stooges pummelling each other and for good measure about thirty co-eds bathing and singing in an enormous Art Deco shower. Completing the disc is 1951's Gold Raiders, a creaky B-Western that looks like it should have appeared 15 years earlier. It's also an independent production and the only non-MGM film in this set. Gold Raiders shows that with merely a few days on the back lot and minimal editing you can keep an entire film under an hour. An aging, paunchy George O'Brien is the hero (an insurance agent!) trying to keep the local mine from being taken over by an evil landowner. The Stooges are travelling salesmen who help O'Brien but since they're incidental to the story any comedy is fleeting.

Overall the transfers in the Classic Comedy Teams Collection are sharp but the sources aren't always the best quality. Gold Raiders has some abrupt splices, including one that clips off a bit of dialogue. Lost in a Harem has a lot of speckling and in one part noticable print damage (which fortunately lasts barely a second or so). The only extras are a few trailers and subtitle options (English, French and Spanish). Still, the set is inexpensively priced and anybody interested in the films will be glad to have them.

For more information about Classic Comedy Teams Collection, visit Warner Video. To order Classic Comedy Teams Collection, go to TCM Shopping.

by Lang Thompson
Classic Comedy Teams Collection - Abbott & Costello, Laurel And Hardy And The Three Stooges Are Featured In Classic Comedy Teams Collection

Classic Comedy Teams Collection - Abbott & Costello, Laurel and Hardy and The Three Stooges Are Featured in CLASSIC COMEDY TEAMS COLLECTION

We've seen a steady stream of older films coming out on DVD but all you have to do is poke any film buff to hear about the classics that have yet to appear. Poke twice and you can also hear about the missing fan favorites, the ones that will never make any "best of" list but still hold a special place for some viewer or maybe just a final notch for a completist. Despite its title, the Classic Comedy Teams Collection is aimed more at the fans. Abbott and Costello, Laurel and Hardy and the Three Stooges each get a disc with two of their films. None are the best place to become acquainted with any of these teams but all films are new to DVD and if they aren't masterpieces at least they're mostly entertaining. The Abbott and Costello disc is easily the strongest. The duo was allowed to make one film a year away from their home studio of Universal so during the peak of their popularity they went three times to MGM. Two of those films are in this set and can't be found in the otherwise comprehensive four volume Best of Abbott & Costello (the third film, 1941's Rio Rita, has yet to appear on DVD). Lost in a Harem (1944) shows more of the MGM gloss than Abbott & Costello's usual films even if the story about the two rescuing a blonde singer (B-movie perennial Marilyn Maxwell) and overthrowing an evil ruler is a bit thin. The film makes good use of sets left over from Kismet and there's a song and a half from the Jimmy Dorsey band. Abbott and Costello are generally quite lively with a mix of slapstick and verbal routines, even at one point recreating the classic vaudeville bit "Slowly I Turned." Slightly more predictable is Abbott and Costello in Hollywood (1945), the first film to feature their name in the title. This time the two are show biz barbers who decide that being a talent agent is the ticket to easy money so they promote an Iowa-fresh singer over an established star. The film tends more towards a string of routines though there are some good ones including the two trying to cure Costello's insomnia, him pretending to be a stunt dummy and even a frantic chase at the end. The big missed opportunity was to exploit the Hollywood setting more; there are cameos from Lucille Ball, Rags Ragland and Preston Foster but that's about it. Like Abbott and Costello, the Laurel and Hardy disc collects two MGM wartime films but in this case that's a bit past their prime period. Still, Laurel and Hardy bring unflappable good cheer and years of experience that give these films a charm that would certainly have been lacking if anybody else had starred. Air Raid Wardens (1943) opens with a voice-over straight out of Our Town, describing the small community that's about to participate in the war. Laurel and Hardy ran a string of failed businesses and now have been rejected by the military as well they end up as, you guessed it, air raid wardens. Not much to the warden angle so we also get Nazi spies, a stuffy bank president, a short-tempered teamster and even a rambunctious stray dog. There's a nice bit with the two trying to enter a town meeting quietly and an inventive gag with a carrier pigeon. Nothing But Trouble (1944) stretches everything a bit more thin. Seems that there's an exiled teenage king from some operetta country who just want to be a regular boy and play football. Laurel and Hardy befriend him, thinking he's just a wayward kid but not much happens. The film had been pitched a couple of years earlier and at one point involved helicopters and gags by Buster Keaton. None of that is in the final film; the studio must have decided that "Imagine Laurel and Hardy as a chef and a butler" was good enough and less expensive. Though the king's story is mostly padding, you're not likely to forget Stan trying to serve at a high-class dinner party and may even have fond memories of the two trying to grab a steak (actually horsemeat) from the lion's cage at the zoo. The Three Stooges disc is something of an oddity since the team plays only supporting roles in both films. Meet the Baron (1933) is the more interesting since it's an example of the goofy, anything-goes comedies of the early 30s though admittedly not one of the better ones. The film was designed to put onto screen Jack Pearl, whose recreation of eternal tall tale teller Baron Munchausen had been a radio and stage smash in preceeding years (and would quickly vanish: he appeared in only one other film while his radio career trickled out). With Jimmy Durante as his buddy, the Baron crashes an all-girls college where the janitors are Ted Healey and His Stooges (that's right, not yet the Three Stooges). So you get a lot of running around, recreations of Pearl's radio skits, the Stooges pummelling each other and for good measure about thirty co-eds bathing and singing in an enormous Art Deco shower. Completing the disc is 1951's Gold Raiders, a creaky B-Western that looks like it should have appeared 15 years earlier. It's also an independent production and the only non-MGM film in this set. Gold Raiders shows that with merely a few days on the back lot and minimal editing you can keep an entire film under an hour. An aging, paunchy George O'Brien is the hero (an insurance agent!) trying to keep the local mine from being taken over by an evil landowner. The Stooges are travelling salesmen who help O'Brien but since they're incidental to the story any comedy is fleeting. Overall the transfers in the Classic Comedy Teams Collection are sharp but the sources aren't always the best quality. Gold Raiders has some abrupt splices, including one that clips off a bit of dialogue. Lost in a Harem has a lot of speckling and in one part noticable print damage (which fortunately lasts barely a second or so). The only extras are a few trailers and subtitle options (English, French and Spanish). Still, the set is inexpensively priced and anybody interested in the films will be glad to have them. For more information about Classic Comedy Teams Collection, visit Warner Video. To order Classic Comedy Teams Collection, go to TCM Shopping. by Lang Thompson

Abbott and Costello in Hollywood


During the era of World War II, the entertainment industry's hottest commodity was a pair of patter comics who had honed their craft in the fading days of burlesque and who had conquered the legitimate stage, radio, and Hollywood by the time the '40s dawned. Within four years, Bud Abbott and Lou Costello had fifteen feature films to their credit, primarily produced by Universal. Abbott and Costello in Hollywood (1945), their third and final effort under the aegis of MGM, combines a smattering of Tinseltown cameos and inside humor with the duo's familiar brand of wordplay.

As with most A & C vehicles, the plot is typically incidental: Buzz (Bud) and Abercrombie (Lou) have dead-end careers as a barber and porter for a swanky Hollywood salon. While making an office call on high-powered agent Horman Royce (Warner Anderson), they marvel at the percentages he takes in and decide that this is the racket for them. To that end, they appoint themselves as representation for Jeff Parker (Robert Stanton), a kid from the sticks with obvious singing talent and the recipient of a recent brush-off from Royce. Jeff finds another champion in Claire Warren (Frances Rafferty), an ex-colleague of Buzz and Abercrombie's who's now a rising starlet.

Wearing the black hat in this scenario is Royce's client, the smug screen crooner Gregory Lemaise (Carleton Young), who sees the gifted Jeff as a threat to his designs on Claire as well as his plans for her upcoming musical, currently in production. While his hapless handlers are dodging the grasp of studio security, Jeff wins the part that Lemaise had walked out on; Lemaise spitefully responds by leaning on the producers and wresting the role back from the unknown. The wanna-be agents cook up a convoluted scheme to prevent Lemaise's further participation in the film, with the upshot being the furious heavy's pursuit of Abercrombie across a roller coaster (a fun sequence shot on the musical's elaborate midway set).

MGM had struck a once-a-year option for Bud and Lou's services, and while one would have thought that production values might have increased from what A&C were used to over at Universal, it seems that the opposite had been the case. MGM wrung substantial savings out of the convenient back lot settings, with the bulk of the budget being reflected in the production number finale. Further, while you'd think the MGM talent roster would provide a steady stream of walk-ons, the amount delivered--Lucille Ball, Preston Foster, Robert Z. Leonard, "Rags" Ragland, Jackie Jenkins--is surprisingly slight.

Like any other A&C film, though, Abbott and Costello in Hollywood is at its best when the decks are cleared and Bud and Lou are allowed to cut loose. Easily the best comic sequence finds Costello in the throes of insomnia. An unusually compassionate Abbott offers his buddy a sleep-aid phonograph record, which works fine to a point--when the skipping at the end of the record jars Lou awake. Bud's offer to stand vigil over the Victrola proves a bust, as the record makes him conk out immediately. The hilarious exchange where they try to rectify the situation with earplugs was excerpted for That's Entertainment, Part II (1976).

It's pretty much a given that Abbott and Costello primarily regarded the plots of their films as frameworks on which they could drape their vast repertoire of proven comic chestnuts. Abbott and Costello in Hollywood scenarist Nat Perrin confirmed as much to Bob Furmanek and Ron Palumbo in their exhaustive survey of the team entitled, aptly enough, Abbott and Costello in Hollywood (Perigee). "They would do the general idea of what was written, then throw in whatever came into their heads, just to get it done in one take," Perrin recalled. "I saw that as a terrible waste, because I thought that Costello was an extremely talented guy, as was Abbott in his way. But they weren't fussy about what they were going to do."

Jean Porter, the petite, pretty contract player cast as Costello's love interest, recalled for Furmanek and Palumbo the convivial atmosphere that earmarked a typical A&C shoot. "[T]he jokes were worth it. I think that comforted them," stated Porter. "I think when they could play around fool around and have other people join in--and they had a lot of their old buddies with them on- and off-camera--that made them comfortable." Soon after Abbott and Costello in Hollywood wrapped, MGM announced that the team's annual option would no longer be picked up, and the duo happily headed back to Universal's familiar confines, where they would primarily ply their comic craft for another decade.

Producer: Martin A. Gosch, S. Sylvan Simon
Director: S. Sylvan Simon
Screenplay: Nat Perrin, Lou Breslow (based on a story by Nat Perrin and Martin A. Gosch)
Cinematography: Charles Edgar Schoenbaum
Film Editing: Ben Lewis
Art Direction: Cedric Gibbons, Wade B. Rubottom
Music: George Bassman
Cast: Bud Abbott (Buzz Kurtis), Lou Costello (Abercrombie), Frances Rafferty (Claire Warren), Bob Haymes (Jeff Parker, as Robert Stanton), Jean Porter (Ruthie), Warner Anderson (Horman Royce), Mike Mazurki (Klondike Pete), Carleton G. Young (Gregory Lemaise).
BW-83m. Closed captioning.

by Jay S. Steinberg

Abbott and Costello in Hollywood

During the era of World War II, the entertainment industry's hottest commodity was a pair of patter comics who had honed their craft in the fading days of burlesque and who had conquered the legitimate stage, radio, and Hollywood by the time the '40s dawned. Within four years, Bud Abbott and Lou Costello had fifteen feature films to their credit, primarily produced by Universal. Abbott and Costello in Hollywood (1945), their third and final effort under the aegis of MGM, combines a smattering of Tinseltown cameos and inside humor with the duo's familiar brand of wordplay. As with most A & C vehicles, the plot is typically incidental: Buzz (Bud) and Abercrombie (Lou) have dead-end careers as a barber and porter for a swanky Hollywood salon. While making an office call on high-powered agent Horman Royce (Warner Anderson), they marvel at the percentages he takes in and decide that this is the racket for them. To that end, they appoint themselves as representation for Jeff Parker (Robert Stanton), a kid from the sticks with obvious singing talent and the recipient of a recent brush-off from Royce. Jeff finds another champion in Claire Warren (Frances Rafferty), an ex-colleague of Buzz and Abercrombie's who's now a rising starlet. Wearing the black hat in this scenario is Royce's client, the smug screen crooner Gregory Lemaise (Carleton Young), who sees the gifted Jeff as a threat to his designs on Claire as well as his plans for her upcoming musical, currently in production. While his hapless handlers are dodging the grasp of studio security, Jeff wins the part that Lemaise had walked out on; Lemaise spitefully responds by leaning on the producers and wresting the role back from the unknown. The wanna-be agents cook up a convoluted scheme to prevent Lemaise's further participation in the film, with the upshot being the furious heavy's pursuit of Abercrombie across a roller coaster (a fun sequence shot on the musical's elaborate midway set). MGM had struck a once-a-year option for Bud and Lou's services, and while one would have thought that production values might have increased from what A&C were used to over at Universal, it seems that the opposite had been the case. MGM wrung substantial savings out of the convenient back lot settings, with the bulk of the budget being reflected in the production number finale. Further, while you'd think the MGM talent roster would provide a steady stream of walk-ons, the amount delivered--Lucille Ball, Preston Foster, Robert Z. Leonard, "Rags" Ragland, Jackie Jenkins--is surprisingly slight. Like any other A&C film, though, Abbott and Costello in Hollywood is at its best when the decks are cleared and Bud and Lou are allowed to cut loose. Easily the best comic sequence finds Costello in the throes of insomnia. An unusually compassionate Abbott offers his buddy a sleep-aid phonograph record, which works fine to a point--when the skipping at the end of the record jars Lou awake. Bud's offer to stand vigil over the Victrola proves a bust, as the record makes him conk out immediately. The hilarious exchange where they try to rectify the situation with earplugs was excerpted for That's Entertainment, Part II (1976). It's pretty much a given that Abbott and Costello primarily regarded the plots of their films as frameworks on which they could drape their vast repertoire of proven comic chestnuts. Abbott and Costello in Hollywood scenarist Nat Perrin confirmed as much to Bob Furmanek and Ron Palumbo in their exhaustive survey of the team entitled, aptly enough, Abbott and Costello in Hollywood (Perigee). "They would do the general idea of what was written, then throw in whatever came into their heads, just to get it done in one take," Perrin recalled. "I saw that as a terrible waste, because I thought that Costello was an extremely talented guy, as was Abbott in his way. But they weren't fussy about what they were going to do." Jean Porter, the petite, pretty contract player cast as Costello's love interest, recalled for Furmanek and Palumbo the convivial atmosphere that earmarked a typical A&C shoot. "[T]he jokes were worth it. I think that comforted them," stated Porter. "I think when they could play around fool around and have other people join in--and they had a lot of their old buddies with them on- and off-camera--that made them comfortable." Soon after Abbott and Costello in Hollywood wrapped, MGM announced that the team's annual option would no longer be picked up, and the duo happily headed back to Universal's familiar confines, where they would primarily ply their comic craft for another decade. Producer: Martin A. Gosch, S. Sylvan Simon Director: S. Sylvan Simon Screenplay: Nat Perrin, Lou Breslow (based on a story by Nat Perrin and Martin A. Gosch) Cinematography: Charles Edgar Schoenbaum Film Editing: Ben Lewis Art Direction: Cedric Gibbons, Wade B. Rubottom Music: George Bassman Cast: Bud Abbott (Buzz Kurtis), Lou Costello (Abercrombie), Frances Rafferty (Claire Warren), Bob Haymes (Jeff Parker, as Robert Stanton), Jean Porter (Ruthie), Warner Anderson (Horman Royce), Mike Mazurki (Klondike Pete), Carleton G. Young (Gregory Lemaise). BW-83m. Closed captioning. by Jay S. Steinberg

Quotes

Trivia

After the disappointing performance of this film at the box office, MGM dropped its option to produce more Abbott & Costello films.

Notes

Some contemporary sources list the title of this film as Abbott and Costello in Hollywood. The working title for the film was Close Shave. The picture marked Martin Gosch's initial effort as a producer for M-G-M, and was the first film for Bud Abbott and Lou Costello under their new contract with M-G-M. Dance director Charles Walters appeared onscreen in the minor role of "sailor." A July 1945 New York Times article notes that the film was to have been the first of many M-G-M films starring former Universal players Bud Abbott and Lou Costello, but that the contract between the studio and the comedy team, which called for one film per year for four years, was later abrogated. Mano Artzt, who was hired as a technical advisor on the film, was head of the M-G-M barber shop. M-G-M studio records indicate that the song "Put a Little Salt on the Bluebird's Tail" was recorded for the film but not used.

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States 1945

Released in United States 1945