Warner Anderson


Actor
Warner Anderson

About

Birth Place
Brooklyn, New York, USA
Born
March 10, 1911

Biography

Warner Anderson acted in several films per-year during much of the 1940s, frequently as a military man or other authority figure. This paved the way for the role of Lieutenant Ben Guthrie in "The Lineup," a cop drama that ran for a decade beginning in 1954, as well as co-starring parts in films such as "The Caine Mutiny," released in the same year, and the science fiction classic "Destin...

Biography

Warner Anderson acted in several films per-year during much of the 1940s, frequently as a military man or other authority figure. This paved the way for the role of Lieutenant Ben Guthrie in "The Lineup," a cop drama that ran for a decade beginning in 1954, as well as co-starring parts in films such as "The Caine Mutiny," released in the same year, and the science fiction classic "Destination Moon." By the 1960s, Anderson was a regular on the small screen, appearing in the first 100-plus episodes of the popular evening soap "Peyton Place" as newspaper editor Matthew Swain, whose occasional lack of tact brings him many enemies.

Filmography

 

Cast (Feature Film)

Rio Conchos (1964)
Colonel Wagner
Armored Command (1961)
Lieutenant Colonel Wilson
The Lineup (1958)
Lt. [Ben] Guthrie
Blackboard Jungle (1955)
Dr. Bradley
A Lawless Street (1955)
Hamer Thorne
The Violent Men (1955)
Jim McCloud
Drum Beat (1954)
General Canby
The Caine Mutiny (1954)
Capt. Blakely
The Yellow Tomahawk (1954)
Major Ives
City Story (1954)
John McWilliams
The Last Posse (1953)
Robert Emerson
A Lion Is in the Streets (1953)
Jules Bolduc
The Star (1952)
Harry Stone
Detective Story (1951)
Endicott Sims
Santa Fe (1951)
Dave Baxter
Go for Broke! (1951)
Col. Charles W. Pence
The Blue Veil (1951)
Bill Ashworth
Bannerline (1951)
Roy
Only the Valiant (1951)
Rutledge
Destination Moon (1950)
Dr. Charles Cargraves
The Lucky Stiff (1949)
Eddie Britt
The Doctor and the Girl (1949)
Dr. George Esmond
Command Decision (1949)
Colonel Earnet Haley
High Wall (1948)
Dr. George Poward
Alias a Gentleman (1948)
Captain Charlie Lopen
Tenth Avenue Angel (1948)
Joseph Mills
Song of the Thin Man (1947)
Dr. Monolaw
The Arnelo Affair (1947)
Sam Leonard
Dark Delusion (1947)
Teddy Selkirk
The Beginning or the End (1947)
Captain William S. Parsons, U.S.N.
Three Wise Fools (1946)
The O'Monahan
Faithful in My Fashion (1946)
Walter Medcraft
Bad Bascomb (1946)
Luther Mason
My Reputation (1946)
Frank Everett
Dangerous Partners (1945)
Miles Kempen
Her Highness and the Bellboy (1945)
Paul MacMillan
Bud Abbott and Lou Costello in Hollywood (1945)
Norman Royce
Objective, Burma! (1945)
Colonel Carter
Week-End at the Waldorf (1945)
Dr. Robert Campbell
Destination Tokyo (1944)
Executive officer
This Is the Army (1943)
Sports announcer
The Sunbeam (1916)
Bobby Rutherford

Cast (Short)

The Cinematographer (1951)
Narrator
Trial by Trigger (1944)
Oklahoma Outlaws (1943)

Life Events

Videos

Movie Clip

Destination Tokyo (1943) - Join Us In Holding Our Breath The climax of a lengthy suspense sequence, Cary Grant as the steely Captain Cassidy guides the U.S.S. Copperfin into Tokyo Bay, through a mine-field, in the draught of a Japanese cruiser, keeping silent, John Ridgely, Warner Anderson, John Alvin among the crew, in DestinationTokyo, 1943.
Beginning Or The End, The (1947) - Atom Bomb Special A wholly fictional prologue, as the ceremony covered in this fake newsreel never took place, and all the identified historical figures are portrayed by actors (Brian Donlevy, Hume Cronyn prominent), in MGM’s government-approved story of the atom bomb, The Beginning Or The End, 1947.
Violent Men, The (1955) - They Always Look Tougher Coming At You Rancher Parrish (Glenn Ford) meets more resistance than expected from his crew (Warner Anderson, Bill Phipps) and his neighbors the Purdues (Harry Shannon, James Anderson) over his plans to sell out to the local land baron, in The Violent Men, 1955, from a Donald Hamilton novel.
High Wall (1947) - Youre Not Getting Out After successful brain surgery which he long resisted, war vet and father Kenet (Robert Taylor), still believing he killed his wife, seeks release, doctors Lorrison (Audrey Totter), Poward (Warner Anderson) and especially Dunlap (Moroni Olsen) evaluating, in High Wall, 1947.
Star, The (1952) - Pick My Bones! Opening scenes, Bette Davis as "Margaret Elliott" bumps into former agent Harry (Warner Anderson), in The Star, 1952, from an original screenplay by Joan Crawford pals Dale Eunson and Katherine Albert.
My Reputation (1946) -- Who Steals My Purse Firmly planted in suburban Chicago and Shakespeare's Othello, servant Anna (Esther Dale) and friend Frank (Warner Anderson) are introduced along with the star, widowed Jessica (Barbara Stanwyck), opening Curtis Bernhardt's My Reputation 1946.
Lawless Street, A (1955) - Mother Says I Mustn't Musical performance by traveling star Tally (Angela Lansbury), well-received in Medicine Bend, Colorado, visited backstage by Marshal Ware (Randolph Scott), their history, implied earlier, further explained, in director Joseph H. Lewis’ Western, co-produced by Scott, A Lawless Street, 1955.
Lawless Street, A (1955) - Lily Langtry Never Had Better In director Joseph H. Lewis’ efficient, stylish Western, we join Marshal Ware (Randolph Scott) with gambler Cody (John Emery), observing Jean Parker with entrepreneur Dean (Hamer Thorne), who greets showgirl Tally (Angela Lansbury), who seems to know the marshal, in A Lawless Street, 1955.
Week-end At The Waldorf (1945) - Loot From A Fan First scene for Leon Ames as producer Burton and Ginger Rogers as the much-mentioned movie star Irene, upstairs at a party preceding her premiere, her friend Dr. Campbell (Warner Anderson) standing by, in MGM's Week-end At The Waldorf, 1945.
Destination Moon (1950) - Your Vindication The seminal if low-rent opening from producer George Pal, credits leading to scientist Cargraves (Warner Anderson) and General Thayer (Tom Powers) in a bunker, in the landmark post-WWII Science Fiction feature, from a story and script by Robert Heinlein, Destination Moon, 1950.
Destination Moon (1950) - Only American Industry Ending the Walter Lantz-Woody Woodpecker cartoon they've cleverly had made to support their case for a privately-funded moon mission, industrialist Barnes (John Archer) lets General Thayer (Tom Powers) bring home the point to a gathering of investors, in George Pal's Destination Moon, 1950.
Destination Moon (1950) - Weightless In Free Orbit In a well conceived sequence from Robert Heinlein's novel, Barnes, Cargraves, General Thayer and wiseguy Joe (John Archer, Warner Anderson, Tom Powers, Dick Wesson) feel some serious G's in the launch of the first manned moon mission, in producer George Pal's ground-breaking Destination Moon, 1950.

Bibliography