Gerald Hirschfeld


Director Of Photography

About

Also Known As
Jerry Hirschfeld
Birth Place
New York City, New York, USA
Born
April 25, 1921

Biography

Celebrated for recreating the look of Universal's 1930s horror films in his work on Mel Brooks' 1974 spoof, "Young Frankenstein." Hirschfeld is also noted for his ability to add polish to moderately budgeted projects....

Biography

Celebrated for recreating the look of Universal's 1930s horror films in his work on Mel Brooks' 1974 spoof, "Young Frankenstein." Hirschfeld is also noted for his ability to add polish to moderately budgeted projects.

Filmography

 

Cinematography (Feature Film)

Secret Sins of the Father (1994)
Director Of Photography
Child In The Night (1990)
Director Of Photography
Malone (1987)
Director Of Photography
Head Office (1986)
Director Of Photography
Love Lives On (1985)
Director Of Photography
To Be or Not to Be (1983)
Director Of Photography
My Favorite Year (1982)
Director Of Photography
Country Gold (1982)
Director Of Photography
Sunday Lovers (1981)
Director Of Photography (American Segment)
Neighbors (1981)
Director Of Photography
Why Would I Lie? (1980)
Director Of Photography
The Bell Jar (1979)
Director Of Photography
Americathon (1979)
Director Of Photography
The House Of God (1979)
Director Of Photography
The World's Greatest Lover (1977)
Director Of Photography
The Car (1977)
Director Of Photography
Two-Minute Warning (1976)
Director Of Photography
Mastermind (1976)
Director Of Photography
Shell Game (1975)
Director Of Photography
The Ultimate Warrior (1975)
Director Of Photography
Dragonfly (1975)
Director Of Photography
W (1974)
Director Of Photography
Young Frankenstein (1974)
Director Of Photography
Gravy Train (1974)
Director Of Photography
Summer Wishes, Winter Dreams (1973)
Director Of Photography
Two People (1973)
Cinematography (New York Sequences)
Child's Play (1972)
Director of Photography
Doc (1971)
Director of Photography
T. R. Baskin (1971)
Director of Photography
Diary of a Mad Housewife (1970)
Director of Photography
Cotton Comes to Harlem (1970)
Director of Photography
Some Kind of a Nut (1969)
Director of Photography
Last Summer (1969)
Director of Photography
Goodbye, Columbus (1969)
Director of Photography
The Incident (1967)
Director of Photography
Fail Safe (1964)
Director of Photography
Josette from New Orleans (1958)
Director of Photography
The Impressionable Years: American Children and the Public Library (1952)
Director of Photography
Two Gals and a Guy (1951)
Director of Photography
Mister Universe (1951)
Director of Photography
With These Hands (1950)
Director of Photography
Guilty Bystander (1950)
Director of Photography
C-Man (1949)
Director of Photography
Shades of Gray (1948)
Photography

Film Production - Main (Feature Film)

Coma (1978)
Photography
Slow Dancing In The Big City (1978)
Photography

Misc. Crew (Feature Film)

Malone (1987)
Dp/Cinematographer
Country Gold (1982)
Other
Neighbors (1981)
Dp/Cinematographer
Two-Minute Warning (1976)
Other

Cinematography (TV Mini-Series)

The Neon Empire (1989)
Director Of Photography

Film Production - Main (TV Mini-Series)

King (1978)
Photography

Life Events

1948

First feature, for the Army, "Shades of Gray"

1949

Standard feature debut, credited for photography, "C-Man"

1950

First cinematography credit, "Guilty Bystander"

1964

Returned to Hollywood filmmaking after 15 year hiatus, functioned as D.P. For Sidney Lumet's, "Fail Safe"

1967

First collaboration with Larry Peerce, "The Incident"

1973

TV-movie debut, credited as director of photography, "The Affair"

1974

Herralded for his work on the cult classic, "Young Frankenstein", credited as DP

1978

Provided additional photography for the miniseries, "King"

1983

Credited as one of four directors for the network series, "Mr. Smith"

1989

Most recently collaborated with Larry Peerce for the Showtime miniseries, "The Neon Empire"

Videos

Movie Clip

Young Frankenstein (1974) - Give Me A Hand With The Bags Showing up for just her second scene almost 90 minutes into the feature, Madeline Kahn as American fiancè Elizabeth appears still to have Frederick (co-writer and title character Gene Wilder) under her thumb, his Transylvanian aides (Terri Garr as Inga, Marty Feldman as Igor) keeping up in their own way, in Mel Brooks’ Young Frankenstein, 1974.
Young Frankenstein (1974) - Not On The Lips! Entirely without introduction, seeing off professor Frederick (Gene Wilder, title character and co-writer with director Mel Brooks), headed to Transylvania to claim his inheritance, at a steamy American train station, Madeline Kahn as fiancè Elizabeth, who has a couple hangups, in the celebrated satire Young Frankenstein, 1974.
Young Frankenstein (1974) - A Temporary Companion Actually borrowing from Bride Of Frankenstein, 1935, director Mel Brooks’ escaped monster (Peter Boyle) drops in on the altogether uncredited lonely blind monk played by Gene Hackman, in Young Frankenstein, from a screenplay by Brooks and star Gene Wilder.
Young Frankenstein (1974) - What Hump? Arrived in Transylvania to claim his inheritance, professor Victor Frankenstein (Gene Wilder) explains his pronunciation to Igor (Marty Feldman), who has his own, and meets his unexpected personal assistant Inge (Teri Garr) for a hayride, in Mel Brooks Young Frankenstein, 1974.
My Favorite Year - Open, 1954 Opening titles with Nat Cole singing "Stardust," and narration by Mark Linn-Baker as "Benji Stone," setting up the director Richard Benjamin's "Peter O'Toole as Errol Flynn" comedy My Favorite Year, 1982, executive producer Mel Brooks.
My Favorite Year (1982) - Clarence Duffy An interlude in Central Park, TV writer Benji (Mark Linn-Baker) shares secrets with errant movie star Alan Swann (Peter O'Toole) whom he's minding, in Richard Benjamin's My Favorite Year, 1982.
My Favorite Year (1982) - If I Were Truly Plastered Inebriated guest Alan Swan (Peter O'Toole) arrives as TV star King Kaiser (Joseph Bologna) and staff are sampling clips of his old movies, writer Benji (Mark Linn-Baker) mediating, in Richard Benjamin's My Favorite Year, 1982.
My Favorite Year (1982) - They Married Me Dissolute movie star Alan Swann (Peter O'Toole) with his TV variety-show minder Benji (Mark Linn-Baker) at The Stork Club, makes nice with a fan and contrives to escape with a dishy spectator, in My Favorite Year, 1982.
Young Frankenstein (1974) - Frau Blucher Now at the family castle, accompanied by Inge (Teri Garr) and Igor (Marty Feldman), professor Frankenstein (co-screenwriter Gene Wilder) meets Frau Blucher (Cloris Leachman) and her running gag, in Mel Brooks' hit spoof Young Frankenstein, 1974.
Fail-Safe (1964) - Who Gives That Order? First scene for translator Buck (Larry Hagman) and for the president (Henry Fonda), going underground at the start of the crisis precipitated by an accidental incursion by an American nuclear bomber squadron, consulting with General Bogan (Frank Overton), in Sidney Lumet's Fail-Safe, 1964.
Fail-Safe (1964) - Nightmare, Opening Dan O'Herlihy, as "General Black," features in the nightmare sequence and opening credits to Fail-Safe 1964, directed by Sidney Lumet, starring Henry Fonda and Walter Matthau.
Fail-Safe (1964) - This Is Our Chance! Knapp (Russell Collins), Colonel Cascio (Fritz Weaver) et al at missile command as the accidental American nuclear attack proceeds, Secretary Swenson (William Hansen) presiding in the war room, hawkish civilian Groeteschele (Walter Matthau) dominating, the president (Henry Fonda) sequestered, in Sidney Lumet's Cold War thriller Fail-Safe, 1964.

Trailer

Bibliography