Young Frankenstein


1h 48m 1974
Young Frankenstein

Brief Synopsis

A descendant of Dr. Frankenstein sets out to make a man.

Film Details

Also Known As
Frankenstein junior
MPAA Rating
Genre
Comedy
Horror
Period
Release Date
1974

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 48m
Sound
Stereo (Westrex Recording System)
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1, 1.85 : 1

Synopsis

Victor Frankenstein, (that's pronounced Frahnken-steen) is a neurosurgeon who has spent his life distancing himself from the legend of his grandfather who created the monster. But when Victor inherits Frankenstein Castle, he is drawn into the family business of reanimating life. Now proudly reclaiming the original pronunciation of his surname, Victor is aided in his work by his pretty assistant Inga, hunchback Igor (pronounced Eye-gor) and Frau Bl├╝cher who turns out to have been his grandfather's girlfriend! Together, they create a new monster/man-about-town.

Videos

Movie Clip

Young Frankenstein (1974) - Give Me A Hand With The Bags Showing up for just her second scene almost 90 minutes into the feature, Madeline Kahn as American fiancè Elizabeth appears still to have Frederick (co-writer and title character Gene Wilder) under her thumb, his Transylvanian aides (Terri Garr as Inga, Marty Feldman as Igor) keeping up in their own way, in Mel Brooks’ Young Frankenstein, 1974.
Young Frankenstein (1974) - Not On The Lips! Entirely without introduction, seeing off professor Frederick (Gene Wilder, title character and co-writer with director Mel Brooks), headed to Transylvania to claim his inheritance, at a steamy American train station, Madeline Kahn as fiancè Elizabeth, who has a couple hangups, in the celebrated satire Young Frankenstein, 1974.
Young Frankenstein (1974) - A Temporary Companion Actually borrowing from Bride Of Frankenstein, 1935, director Mel Brooks’ escaped monster (Peter Boyle) drops in on the altogether uncredited lonely blind monk played by Gene Hackman, in Young Frankenstein, from a screenplay by Brooks and star Gene Wilder.
Young Frankenstein (1974) - What Hump? Arrived in Transylvania to claim his inheritance, professor Victor Frankenstein (Gene Wilder) explains his pronunciation to Igor (Marty Feldman), who has his own, and meets his unexpected personal assistant Inge (Teri Garr) for a hayride, in Mel Brooks Young Frankenstein, 1974.
Young Frankenstein (1974) - Frau Blucher Now at the family castle, accompanied by Inge (Teri Garr) and Igor (Marty Feldman), professor Frankenstein (co-screenwriter Gene Wilder) meets Frau Blucher (Cloris Leachman) and her running gag, in Mel Brooks' hit spoof Young Frankenstein, 1974.
Young Frankenstein (1974) - I Am A Scientist! Having established disregard for his grandfather's work and his new pronunciation, professor Victor Frankenstein (Gene Wilder, the co-screenwriter with director Mel Brooks), deals with subject Hilltop (Liam Dunn) and a pesky student (Danny Goldman), early in Young Frankenstein, 1974.

Trailer

Hosted Intro

Film Details

Also Known As
Frankenstein junior
MPAA Rating
Genre
Comedy
Horror
Period
Release Date
1974

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 48m
Sound
Stereo (Westrex Recording System)
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1, 1.85 : 1

Award Nominations

Best Sound

1974

Best Writing, Screenplay

1975
Mel Brooks

Best Writing, Screenplay

1975
Gene Wilder

Articles

Young Frankenstein


As much a Valentine to Universal's 1930s horror movies as a spoof of them, Young Frankenstein (1974) is one of Mel Brooks' funniest films, along with being his most polished and atmospheric. Beautifully filmed in black and white on some of the original Frankenstein sets, using the old 1:85 aspect ratio and a similar film stock, the movie displays a thorough knowledge of and respect for the old films, along with a deliciously heightened sense of their more ridiculous aspects.

Gene Wilder, who came up with the idea for the film and served as Brooks' co-writer, stars as Dr. Frederick Frankenstein, the grandson of the mad scientist who created the original monster. To distance himself from his history, Frederick insists upon pronouncing the family name as "Frahkensteen." But a visit to the family castle and an encounter with the mysterious Frau Blucher (Cloris Leachman) soon has the grandson putting together his own monstrosity in the form of Peter Boyle -- who, as the new monster, sports a zipper around his neck. Adding immeasurably to the good-natured fun are Marty Feldman as Frederick's pop-eyed assistant, Igor; Madeline Kahn as his high-strung fiancee, Elizabeth; Teri Garr as the busty peasant girl, Inga; Gene Hackman as a blind hermit; and Kenneth Mars as a wooden-armed inspector inspired by Lionel Atwill in Son of Frankenstein (1939).

Kahn originally turned down the role of Inga in favor of playing Elizabeth. She later changed her mind, but it was too late because Garr had already been cast as Inga. Brooks, who "appears" in the film in the form of a gargoyle modeled after him, also voiced the off-screen sounds of a howling wolf and a screaming cat that's hit by a dart -- with the latter effect ad libbed by the director on the set. Another on-the-spot ad lib was Gene Hackman's "I was gonna make espresso" as the monster leaves the hermit's house. The name on the third brain when Igor makes his selection is that of the movie's assistant property master, Charles Sertin. A village guesthouse is named Gausthaus Gruskoff in honor of producer Michael Gruskoff.

Brooks reportedly was so reluctant to end the fun-filled 20th Century Fox production that he kept adding scenes so the company could remain together and continue shooting. He lost his temper only once during filming, becoming so upset that he threw a tantrum with Wilder and stormed out of the studio. Before long, however, he was on the telephone with Wilder saying, "Who was that lunatic yelling and screaming on the set today? You should fire that bum!"

Producer: Michael Gruskoff
Director: Mel Brooks
Screenplay: Gene Wilder and Mel Brooks, from the Mary Shelley novel Frankenstein
Cinematography: Gerald Hirschfeld
Production Design: Dale Hennesy
Original Music: John Morris
Editing: John C. Howard
Costume Design: Dorothy Jeakins
Cast: Gene Wilder (Dr. Frederick Frankenstein), Peter Boyle (The Monster), Marty Feldman (Igor), Madeline Kahn (Elizabeth), Cloris Leachman (Frau Blucher), Teri Garr (Inga), Kenneth Mars (Police Inspector Hans Wilhelm Friederich Kemp), Gene Hackman (Harold, the Blind Man).

by Roger Fristoe
Young Frankenstein

Young Frankenstein

As much a Valentine to Universal's 1930s horror movies as a spoof of them, Young Frankenstein (1974) is one of Mel Brooks' funniest films, along with being his most polished and atmospheric. Beautifully filmed in black and white on some of the original Frankenstein sets, using the old 1:85 aspect ratio and a similar film stock, the movie displays a thorough knowledge of and respect for the old films, along with a deliciously heightened sense of their more ridiculous aspects. Gene Wilder, who came up with the idea for the film and served as Brooks' co-writer, stars as Dr. Frederick Frankenstein, the grandson of the mad scientist who created the original monster. To distance himself from his history, Frederick insists upon pronouncing the family name as "Frahkensteen." But a visit to the family castle and an encounter with the mysterious Frau Blucher (Cloris Leachman) soon has the grandson putting together his own monstrosity in the form of Peter Boyle -- who, as the new monster, sports a zipper around his neck. Adding immeasurably to the good-natured fun are Marty Feldman as Frederick's pop-eyed assistant, Igor; Madeline Kahn as his high-strung fiancee, Elizabeth; Teri Garr as the busty peasant girl, Inga; Gene Hackman as a blind hermit; and Kenneth Mars as a wooden-armed inspector inspired by Lionel Atwill in Son of Frankenstein (1939). Kahn originally turned down the role of Inga in favor of playing Elizabeth. She later changed her mind, but it was too late because Garr had already been cast as Inga. Brooks, who "appears" in the film in the form of a gargoyle modeled after him, also voiced the off-screen sounds of a howling wolf and a screaming cat that's hit by a dart -- with the latter effect ad libbed by the director on the set. Another on-the-spot ad lib was Gene Hackman's "I was gonna make espresso" as the monster leaves the hermit's house. The name on the third brain when Igor makes his selection is that of the movie's assistant property master, Charles Sertin. A village guesthouse is named Gausthaus Gruskoff in honor of producer Michael Gruskoff. Brooks reportedly was so reluctant to end the fun-filled 20th Century Fox production that he kept adding scenes so the company could remain together and continue shooting. He lost his temper only once during filming, becoming so upset that he threw a tantrum with Wilder and stormed out of the studio. Before long, however, he was on the telephone with Wilder saying, "Who was that lunatic yelling and screaming on the set today? You should fire that bum!" Producer: Michael Gruskoff Director: Mel Brooks Screenplay: Gene Wilder and Mel Brooks, from the Mary Shelley novel Frankenstein Cinematography: Gerald Hirschfeld Production Design: Dale Hennesy Original Music: John Morris Editing: John C. Howard Costume Design: Dorothy Jeakins Cast: Gene Wilder (Dr. Frederick Frankenstein), Peter Boyle (The Monster), Marty Feldman (Igor), Madeline Kahn (Elizabeth), Cloris Leachman (Frau Blucher), Teri Garr (Inga), Kenneth Mars (Police Inspector Hans Wilhelm Friederich Kemp), Gene Hackman (Harold, the Blind Man). by Roger Fristoe

Quotes

My grandfather used to work for your grandfather. Of course the rates have gone up.
- Igor
It's times like this that I remember what my old dad used to say.
- Igor
What was that?
- Dr. Friedrich von Frankenstein
"What the hell are you doing in the bathroom all day and night? Why don't you get out of there and give someone else a chance?"
- Igor
Hallo. Vould you like a roll in ze hay?
- Inga
It's fun.
- Inga
Roll, roll, roll in ze hay.
- Inga
Hearts and kidneys are tinkertoys. I'm talking about the central nervous system.
- Dr. Friedrich von Frankenstein
Igor, would you give me a hand with the bags?
- Dr. Friedrich von Frankenstein
Certainly, you take the blonde and I'll take the one in the turban.
- Igor

Trivia

The film was shot in the same castle and with the same props and lab equipment as the original Frankenstein (1931).

The howling wolf sound on the ride to the castle was made by director 'Brooks, Mel' .

When Victor finds his grandfather's private library, he finds a book titled "How I Did It." This is actually a joke for those people who have read Mary Shelley's Frankenstein. In the book, Frankenstein, Shelley never reveals how Victor reanimated dead flesh. The screenwriter obviously knew this and inserts the "How I Did It" book as a joke.

When Dr. Frankenstein descends the stairs into the basement of the castle there is a gargoyle on the wall made to look like director 'Brooks, Mel' .

The assistant property master's name, Charles Sertin, is on the third brain on the shelf.

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States Winter January 1, 1974

Released in United States December 1974

Re-released in United States August 13, 1999

Re-released in United States on Video January 12, 1994

Released in United States April 1981

Released in United States June 2000

Shown at Newport International Film Festival June 6-11, 2000.

Formerly distributed by Key Video.

August 1999 re-elease celebrates the film's 24 1/2 year anniversary (they couldn't wait until the 25th).

Kenneth Stricfaden, who helped create the electrical artifacts for "Frankenstein" (USA/1931), supplied some of the gadgets used in this film.

Selected in 2003 for inclusion in the Library of Congress' National Film Registry.

Released in United States Winter January 1, 1974

Released in United States December 1974

Re-released in United States August 13, 1999

Re-released in United States on Video January 12, 1994

Released in United States April 1981 (Shown at FILMEX: Los Angeles International Film Exposition ("Scared to Death": Horror Movie Marathon) April 2-23, 1981.)

Released in United States June 2000 (Shown at Newport International Film Festival June 6-11, 2000.)