The Car


1h 38m 1977

Brief Synopsis

A small town is terrorized by a fast black indestructible car, which is killing people by running them over, or ramming their cars off the road. It's up to Sheriff Wade to catch it before the driver before kills again. The only problem is, there's no one behind the wheel.

Film Details

Also Known As
Car
MPAA Rating
Release Date
1977

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 38m
Sound
Mono
Color
Color (Technicolor)
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
2.35 : 1

Synopsis

A small town is terrorized by a fast black indestructible car, which is killing people by running them over, or ramming their cars off the road. It's up to Sheriff Wade to catch it before the driver before kills again. The only problem is, there's no one behind the wheel.

Film Details

Also Known As
Car
MPAA Rating
Release Date
1977

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 38m
Sound
Mono
Color
Color (Technicolor)
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
2.35 : 1

Articles

Doris Dowling (1923-2004)


Doris Dowling, the sultry actress who made a memorable film debut as the saloon hooker in Billy Wilder's The Lost Weekend died on June 18 in Los Angeles of natural causes. She was 81.

Doris Dowling was born on May 15, 1923 in Detroit, Michigan. She showed an interest in acting at a young age, and after a few years of stage work in the Midwest, she joined her older sister, the leading lady Constance Dowling, in Hollywood. Paramount soon took notice of the sultry brunette with the soulful expression and husky voice, and promptly signed her to a contract.

She made a stunning film debut as Gloria, the hooker who befriends Ray Milland at a bar, becoming his good-humored confidante in The Lost Weekend (1945); she followed that up in the overlooked, film noir gem, The Blue Dahlia (1946), playing Alan Ladd's shrewish wife before being killed by a mystery killer in the first reel. She made another noir thriller, the forgettable, The Crimson Key (1947), playing, once again, an unsympathetic part before heading off to Europe. Once there, Italian director Giuseppe de Santis used her effectively in Bitter Rice (1948), arguably her best performance as the jewelry thief hiding among women rice workers in Northern Italy; another notable role was as Bianca in Orson Welles' French production of Othello (1951).

She returned to Hollywood in the late '50s, and spent the next three decades doing television work: Bonanza, Perry Mason, Alfred Hitchcock Presents, Barnaby Jones, and The Streets of San Francisco, just to name a few. She retired quietly from acting by the early '80s. She was briefly married to bandleader Artie Shaw (1952-56), and is survived by her son through that marriage, Jonathan; and her husband of 44 years, Leonard Kaufman.

by Michael T. Toole
Doris Dowling (1923-2004)

Doris Dowling (1923-2004)

Doris Dowling, the sultry actress who made a memorable film debut as the saloon hooker in Billy Wilder's The Lost Weekend died on June 18 in Los Angeles of natural causes. She was 81. Doris Dowling was born on May 15, 1923 in Detroit, Michigan. She showed an interest in acting at a young age, and after a few years of stage work in the Midwest, she joined her older sister, the leading lady Constance Dowling, in Hollywood. Paramount soon took notice of the sultry brunette with the soulful expression and husky voice, and promptly signed her to a contract. She made a stunning film debut as Gloria, the hooker who befriends Ray Milland at a bar, becoming his good-humored confidante in The Lost Weekend (1945); she followed that up in the overlooked, film noir gem, The Blue Dahlia (1946), playing Alan Ladd's shrewish wife before being killed by a mystery killer in the first reel. She made another noir thriller, the forgettable, The Crimson Key (1947), playing, once again, an unsympathetic part before heading off to Europe. Once there, Italian director Giuseppe de Santis used her effectively in Bitter Rice (1948), arguably her best performance as the jewelry thief hiding among women rice workers in Northern Italy; another notable role was as Bianca in Orson Welles' French production of Othello (1951). She returned to Hollywood in the late '50s, and spent the next three decades doing television work: Bonanza, Perry Mason, Alfred Hitchcock Presents, Barnaby Jones, and The Streets of San Francisco, just to name a few. She retired quietly from acting by the early '80s. She was briefly married to bandleader Artie Shaw (1952-56), and is survived by her son through that marriage, Jonathan; and her husband of 44 years, Leonard Kaufman. by Michael T. Toole

Quotes

Trivia

There were six Cars built for filming by Barris Kustoms in Lynnwood, California: one main car of steel and five fiberglass replicas. Three replicas were destroyed in the climactic explosion scene and the other two replicas were wrecked in rollovers. The gloss-black main Car is a custom Lincoln Mark III with a locked 4.11 differential (to allow easier spinning), heavy-duty suspension, roll bar, safety harness, and amber-tinted glass. The top is lowered and the beltline raised. Twelve craftsmen built the main Car in six weeks.

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States 1977

Released in United States 1977