The Ultimate Warrior


1h 34m 1975
The Ultimate Warrior

Brief Synopsis

In a plague devastated world, one tired man finds a reason to fight.

Film Details

Also Known As
Barony, The, Ultimate Warrior
MPAA Rating
Genre
Action
Adventure
Sci-Fi
Release Date
1975

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 34m
Sound
Stereo
Color
Color (Technicolor)
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.85 : 1

Synopsis

In New York City in the year 2012, one man fights for what is right in his post-apocalyptic world.

Film Details

Also Known As
Barony, The, Ultimate Warrior
MPAA Rating
Genre
Action
Adventure
Sci-Fi
Release Date
1975

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 34m
Sound
Stereo
Color
Color (Technicolor)
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.85 : 1

Articles

The Ultimate Warrior -


Produced just a few years before the post-apocalyptic action genre burst forth with George Miller's Mad Max (1979), The Ultimate Warrior (1975) is an ambitious film compromised by commercial considerations. The astounding worldwide success of his Bruce Lee Kung Fu picture Enter the Dragon (1973) enabled director Robert Clouse to develop his own hybrid science fiction/action project. Society has broken down in the aftermath of an agricultural plague, and New York City in 2012 is a wasteland run by a feudal boss called The Baron (Max von Sydow). Threatened by an aggressive street gang led by a savage warrior called Carrot (William Smith), The Baron accepts the aid of Carson (Yul Brynner), a mysterious macho drifter. The Baron would like Carson to take over the tribe and help protect his pregnant daughter (Joanna Miles); Carson wants to return to his family on an island off South Carolina. The story soon devolves into a series of martial arts duels. Still spectacularly lithe at age 55, Brynner gives a fine physical performance in his hand-to-hand combat scenes. He plays Carson as a cross between Shane (1953) and his own stylized western characters, taking time out from fighting only to deliver a baby. His primary foe William Smith was a grind-house favorite in biker films, and had played a formidable villain opposite Rod Taylor in Clouse's hard-to-see Darker Than Amber (1970). Although hope arrives with the development of plague-resistant seeds, almost all of the film is devoted to martial arts bouts. Never a visually distinguished director, Robert Clouse makes good use of one enormous set, a subway tunnel that stretched between two full sound stages. But the rest of the film plays out in unimpressive back lot street sets. Star Max von Sydow had a yen for outlandish fantasies, and would later become an excellent Ming the Merciless in the big-budget space opera Flash Gordon (1980). Curiously, the movie that The Ultimate Warrior most resembles is the no-budget 1952 science fiction turnip Captive Women, aka 3,000 AD. Just as in Clouse's picture, warrior gangs fight for turf and compete for women in a post-atomic New York. A major scene even takes place in a derelict subway tunnel.
The Ultimate Warrior -

The Ultimate Warrior -

Produced just a few years before the post-apocalyptic action genre burst forth with George Miller's Mad Max (1979), The Ultimate Warrior (1975) is an ambitious film compromised by commercial considerations. The astounding worldwide success of his Bruce Lee Kung Fu picture Enter the Dragon (1973) enabled director Robert Clouse to develop his own hybrid science fiction/action project. Society has broken down in the aftermath of an agricultural plague, and New York City in 2012 is a wasteland run by a feudal boss called The Baron (Max von Sydow). Threatened by an aggressive street gang led by a savage warrior called Carrot (William Smith), The Baron accepts the aid of Carson (Yul Brynner), a mysterious macho drifter. The Baron would like Carson to take over the tribe and help protect his pregnant daughter (Joanna Miles); Carson wants to return to his family on an island off South Carolina. The story soon devolves into a series of martial arts duels. Still spectacularly lithe at age 55, Brynner gives a fine physical performance in his hand-to-hand combat scenes. He plays Carson as a cross between Shane (1953) and his own stylized western characters, taking time out from fighting only to deliver a baby. His primary foe William Smith was a grind-house favorite in biker films, and had played a formidable villain opposite Rod Taylor in Clouse's hard-to-see Darker Than Amber (1970). Although hope arrives with the development of plague-resistant seeds, almost all of the film is devoted to martial arts bouts. Never a visually distinguished director, Robert Clouse makes good use of one enormous set, a subway tunnel that stretched between two full sound stages. But the rest of the film plays out in unimpressive back lot street sets. Star Max von Sydow had a yen for outlandish fantasies, and would later become an excellent Ming the Merciless in the big-budget space opera Flash Gordon (1980). Curiously, the movie that The Ultimate Warrior most resembles is the no-budget 1952 science fiction turnip Captive Women, aka 3,000 AD. Just as in Clouse's picture, warrior gangs fight for turf and compete for women in a post-atomic New York. A major scene even takes place in a derelict subway tunnel.

Quotes

That's Carrot. He's always there and always on the lie.
- Melinda
He seems to be a very self confident young man.
- Carson
We will both go to hell, you and me!
- Carrot

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States 1975

Released in United States 1975