Blake Edwards


Director, Screenwriter
Blake Edwards

About

Also Known As
William Blake Crump, William Blake Mcedwards, Sam O Brown, Blake Mcedwards
Birth Place
Tulsa, Oklahoma, USA
Born
July 26, 1922
Died
December 15, 2010
Cause of Death
Complications From Pneumonia

Biography

Writer and director Blake Edwards was best known for helming the "Pink Panther" comedies of the 1960s and 1970s, but his contributions to entertainment stretched far beyond those wildly popular slapstick tales of the bumbling Inspector Clouseau. He made a name for himself as a "modern cinema" original by combining a colorful visual style with a knack for layered jokes and subtle blend of...

Photos & Videos

Drive a Crooked Road - Behind-the-Scenes Photos
Experiment in Terror - Movie Poster
Breakfast at Tiffany's - Movie Poster

Family & Companions

Patricia Walker
Wife
Actor. Divorced in 1967.
Julie Andrews
Wife
Actor; author. Married on November 12, 1969; met on the set of "Darling Lili" (1970), married shortly after filmming.

Notes

Edwards used the pseudonym Sam O Brown for his story and screenplay for the film "City Heat" (1984).

Edwards is connected by marriages to the family of screen great Douglas Fairbanks. Donald Crump, Edwards' natural father, was the brother-in-law of Lucile Fairbanks Crump, niece of Douglas Fairbanks and Fairbanks family historian.

Biography

Writer and director Blake Edwards was best known for helming the "Pink Panther" comedies of the 1960s and 1970s, but his contributions to entertainment stretched far beyond those wildly popular slapstick tales of the bumbling Inspector Clouseau. He made a name for himself as a "modern cinema" original by combining a colorful visual style with a knack for layered jokes and subtle blend of high and low humor in films like "Breakfast at Tiffany's" (1961) and "A Shot in the Dark" (1964), and as the creator of the stylish detective series "Peter Gunn" (NBC, 1958-1960, ABC, 1961). A career-long collaboration with composer Henry Mancini's playful compositions became a crucial element in this creative vision. During the 1970s and 1980s, Edwards balanced his ongoing "Pink Panther" releases with more personal, dramatic material that explored the lives of aging artists and society's evolving sexual conventions, best exemplified in his 1979 hit, "10." Only a handful of Edwards' 39 films were hailed with Oscar, Golden Globe and Emmy nominations, but ongoing creative disputes with studio executives compromised what might have been an even larger body of revered work. Misfires notwithstanding, Edwards earned enormous respect among the film industry and his comedies remained popular for generations.

Blake Edwards was born William Blake Crump on July 26, 1922, in Tulsa, OK. His parents divorced when he was young and his mother remarried to Jack McEdwards, a production manager in Hollywood. His stepdad's father was J. Gordon Edwards, an early film director known for his Fox Studio films with racy screen vamp Theda Bara during the teens and early 1920s. Studio backlots became Edwards' playground and the kids of Hollywood heavy-hitters were his childhood friends. He graduated from Beverly Hills High School and served in the Coast Guard briefly before entering the family business, where his stepfather first snared him work as an extra. Edwards advanced to supporting roles, eventually signing a contract with Fox and appearing in nearly 25 films during the mid 1940s, including B-movies like "Strangler of the Swamp" (1945) and classics like William Wyler's "The Best Years of Our Life" (1946).

Shifting his efforts to writing, Edwards wrote for NBC's hardboiled radio serial "Richard Diamond, Private Detective" (NBC, 1949) which began the development of his trademark sense of humor. He made his screenwriting debut in 1948 with "Panhandle," and by the 1950s, Edwards was steadily cranking out screenplays. He produced the syndicated series "City Detective" (1953) and in 1955, made his directorial debut with "Bring Your Smile Along," a thin musical romance in which Constance Towers played a schoolteacher and would-be songwriter who finds love in the big city. He made a bigger impression with his writing and directing efforts on "Mister Cory" (1956), which also helped boost the career of the film's star, a young Tony Curtis. In 1958, Edwards created and directed the Emmy-nominated television detective series "Peter Gunn," whose jazz-loving hipster private eye breathed new life into the genre and established Edwards' fresh, youthful vision.

In theaters, Edwards entered his peak filmmaking years, beginning with the classic Cary Grant and Tony Curtis Navy comedy, "Operation Petticoat" (1959). In 1961, Edwards directed Audrey Hepburn in one of the era's most iconic films, a loose adaptation of Truman Capote's "Breakfast at Tiffany's" which earned the actress an Oscar nomination for her portrayal of a fragile country girl masquerading as an eccentric New York socialite. Henry Mancini, who had begun his collaborations with Edwards on "Peter Gunn," earned an Academy win for the film's enduring score and the famous song, "Moon River." The director followed up with a groundbreaking film that boldly explored a couple's descent into full blown alcohol addiction, "The Days of Wine and Roses" (1963), starring Jack Lemmon and Lee Remick. The film was a Golden Globe nominee for Best Drama, and one that inspired both Lemmon and Edwards to seek their own recovery from alcohol shortly after the film was released.

After proving his versatility with the taut, strikingly photographed thriller "Experiment in Terror" (1962), Edwards introduced audiences to a bumbling French inspector named Jacques Clouseau (Peter Sellers) and began the era of his beloved "Pink Panther" film series. The first release, "The Pink Panther" (1963), was an immediate hit, thanks to writer-director Edwards' blend of high and low humor, a lush visual style, and another sophisticated Mancini score. Sellers, known for his elaborate character creations, ran with the material and left his mark as one of film history's most unlikely and likeable outsider heroes. Behind the camera, however, Sellers and Edwards locked horns often, vowing never to work together again after the successful sequel, "A Shot in the Dark" (1964). Edwards continued in the vein of madcap comedies with the unsuccessful slapstick ode to Laurel and Hardy, "The Great Race" (1965), which was notable for a pie fight that involved the flinging of 2,357 baked goods. "The Party" (1968) found Edwards and Sellers burying the hatchet for a "fish out of water" tale of an East Indian at a swanky Hollywood party. The film later gained a loyal cult following, thanks to Sellers' physical humor and in spite of abundant toilet humor and insensitive cultural stereotyping.

Edwards continued to stumble at the box office, with the enormous financial failure of the espionage spoof "Darling Lili" (1969) on his head and clashes with studio executives over their "butchering" of dramas "Wild Rovers" (1971) and "The Carey Treatment" (1972). Eventually Edwards' heartbreak over the system turned to depression, and he and new bride Julie Andrews - star of "Darling Lili" - moved to Europe, where they remained for most of the decade. Andrews and Edwards collaborated again on the spy romance, "The Tamarind Seed" (1974) before financial necessity led Edwards to reconsider the "Pink Panther" series. Sellers was also experiencing a career lull and both put their differences aside to facilitate a career boost. Independently produced, "The Return of the Pink Panther" (1975) broke box office records and revived the film franchise. Clouseau's boss Dreyfus (Charles Lom) was again obsessed with destroying his underling, the Pink Panther diamond was still at large, and audiences were again rocking theaters with laughter. Edwards and Sellers repeated their success with two more sequels, "The Panther Strikes Again" (1976) and "Revenge of the Pink Panther" (1978). Making his recent success even sweeter, in 1979, Edwards returned triumphantly to the Hollywood fold with the stunning box office and critical success of "10." In the first of a number of autobiographical films, Edwards' adult comedy explored middle-aged angst in an era of changing sexual mores. Edwards' insightful study was one of the biggest box office hits of the year and earned Golden Globe nominations for stars Julie Andrews, Dudley Moore and Bo Derek - who created a sensation, running on a beach in a flesh-colored bathing suit, cornrows blowing in the breeze - and another Oscar for composer Mancini.

Edwards was back in Hollywood, but he was no longer playing the Hollywood game. He next wrote and directed a biting satire of his experiences with big studio brass, "S.O.B." (1981), which remained one of the best send-ups of the film business. He went on create one of the artistic triumphs of his and Andrews' careers with "Victor/Victoria" (1982), a musical adaptation of a 1933 German film about a woman masquerading as a man in drag. The film earned eight Oscar nominations including one for Edwards' adapted screenplay. The same year, however, Edwards' received some flak for "The Trail of the Pink Panther" (1982), which used old footage of the now deceased Sellers to piece together a story. The following year's "Curse of the Pink Panther" (1983) revolved around a new bumbling American detective (Ted Wass) and failed to attract movie audiences.

The remainder of Edwards' work throughout the 1980s seemed to emanate from his own psyche and ran the risk of being labeled self-obsessed. "The Man Who Loved Women" (1983) was a weak remake of the 1977 Francois Truffaut film and starred a womanizing Burt Reynolds, and "That's Life!" (1986) focused on a man (Jack Lemmon) and his fear of turning 60, while his wife (Julie Andrews) worries whether or not she has cancer. It was perhaps Edwards' most personal film, shot at his and Andrews' Malibu home, with much of the dialogue improvised. It was met with mixed critical reception and indifference from audiences. Edwards made a second attempt to pay homage to Laurel and Hardy with a remake of their 1932 short, "The Music Box" called "A Fine Mess" (1986). Again Edwards was plagued by studio interference and unwanted editing, which rendered the film a forgettable flop. Edwards had a minor hit with "Skin Deep" (1989), a comedy in which John Ritter played a drunken, womanizing writer with a multitude of problems and just as much charm to offset them. The film also contained one of the funniest scenes of the decade, in which Ritter dons a glow-in-the-dark condom. "Switch" (1991), in which a macho man awakens as a woman (Ellen Barkin), was resoundingly panned by critics, and Edwards attempted to resurrect his comedy success with "Son of the Pink Panther" (1993), in which Roberto Benigni stepped in as Clouseau's son. Reviews unfavorably compared this effort with the originals and it sank at the box office.

In 1995, Edwards fulfilled a long-held dream of writing and directing a stage musical adaptation of "Victor/Victoria" for Andrews. After a bumpy start in Chicago, the show arrived on Broadway with a score by Henry Mancini and Leslie Bricusse. Many reviews faulted Edwards' direction and musical book, however Andrews received personal raves and the show went on to become a box office success, due in no small part to her presence. Edwards never received an Academy Award during his film career, but in 2004 the Academy of Motion Pictures gave him an honorary award for his lifetime contributions to the film world. On Dec. 15, 2010, the beloved filmmaker passed away from complications of pneumonia in Santa Monica, CA. His wife and five children were at his bedside. He was 88 years old.

Filmography

 

Director (Feature Film)

Blake Edwards' Son of the Pink Panther (1993)
Director
Switch (1991)
Director
Skin Deep (1989)
Director
Peter Gunn (1989)
Director
Justin Case (1988)
Director
Sunset (1988)
Director
Blind Date (1987)
Director
A Fine Mess (1986)
Director
That's Life! (1986)
Director
Micki & Maude (1984)
Director
Curse of the Pink Panther (1983)
Director
The Man who Loved Women (1983)
Director
Trail of the Pink Panther (1982)
Director
Victor/Victoria (1982)
Director
S.O.B. (1981)
Director
10 (1979)
Director
Revenge of The Pink Panther (1978)
Director
The Pink Panther Strikes Again (1976)
Director
The Return Of The Pink Panther (1975)
Director
The Tamarind Seed (1974)
Director
The Carey Treatment (1972)
Director
Wild Rovers (1971)
Director
Darling Lili (1970)
Director
The Party (1968)
Director
Gunn (1967)
Director
What Did You Do in the War, Daddy? (1966)
Director
The Great Race (1965)
Director
The Pink Panther (1964)
Director
A Shot in the Dark (1964)
Director
Days of Wine and Roses (1962)
Director
Experiment in Terror (1962)
Director
Breakfast at Tiffany's (1961)
Director
High Time (1960)
Director
Operation Petticoat (1959)
Director
The Perfect Furlough (1959)
Director
This Happy Feeling (1958)
Director
Mister Cory (1957)
Director
He Laughed Last (1956)
Director
Bring Your Smile Along (1955)
Director

Cast (Feature Film)

I Remember Me (2000)
Audrey Hepburn: Remembered (1993)
Stompin' at the Savoy (1992)
William Holden: The Golden Boy (1989)
Leather Gloves (1948)
Vince Reedy
Panhandle (1948)
Floyd Schofield
The Beginning or the End (1947)
C.I.C. man
Till the End of Time (1946)
Foreman
The Best Years of Our Lives (1946)
Corporal
Tokyo Rose (1946)
Joe
Strangler of the Swamp (1946)
Chris Sanders
The Strange Love of Martha Ivers (1946)
Sailor
They Were Expendable (1945)
Boat crew member
A Guy, a Gal, and a Pal (1945)
Soldier
What Next, Corporal Hargrove? (1945)
Soldier
This Man's Navy (1945)
Flier
Gangs of the Waterfront (1945)
Tommy
Thirty Seconds Over Tokyo (1944)
Officer
Wing and a Prayer (1944)
Pilot
Marine Raiders (1944)
Marine
See Here, Private Hargrove (1944)
Field operator
Marshal of Reno (1944)
Lee Holden
A Guy Named Joe (1944)
Flyer
My Buddy (1944)
Prison kid
The Unwritten Code (1944)
Swede
The Eve of St. Mark (1944)
Soldier
In the Meantime, Darling (1944)
Lt. Eley
She's a Sweetheart (1944)
Soldier
Ladies Courageous (1944)
Pilot
Ten Gentlemen from West Point (1942)
Cadet
Lucky Legs (1942)
Red Arrow messenger

Writer (Feature Film)

The Pink Panther 2 (2009)
Source Material
The Pink Panther (2006)
Source Material
Blake Edwards' Son of the Pink Panther (1993)
From Story
Blake Edwards' Son of the Pink Panther (1993)
Characters As Source Material
Blake Edwards' Son of the Pink Panther (1993)
Story By
Blake Edwards' Son of the Pink Panther (1993)
Screenwriter
Switch (1991)
Screenplay
Peter Gunn (1989)
Characters As Source Material
Peter Gunn (1989)
Screenplay
Skin Deep (1989)
Screenplay
Justin Case (1988)
From Story
Sunset (1988)
Screenplay
Justin Case (1988)
Screenwriter
A Fine Mess (1986)
Screenplay
That's Life! (1986)
Screenplay
City Heat (1984)
From Story
City Heat (1984)
Screenplay
Curse of the Pink Panther (1983)
Screenplay
The Man who Loved Women (1983)
Screenplay
Trail of the Pink Panther (1982)
Story By
Victor/Victoria (1982)
Screenplay
Trail of the Pink Panther (1982)
Screenplay
S.O.B. (1981)
Screenwriter
Casino (1980)
Characters As Source Material
10 (1979)
Screenplay
Revenge of The Pink Panther (1978)
Story By
Revenge of The Pink Panther (1978)
Screenwriter
Revenge of The Pink Panther (1978)
From Story
The Pink Panther Strikes Again (1976)
Screenplay
The Return Of The Pink Panther (1975)
Screenwriter
The Tamarind Seed (1974)
Screenwriter
Wild Rovers (1971)
Writer
Darling Lili (1970)
Screenwriter
The Party (1968)
Screenwriter
Gunn (1967)
Screenwriter
What Did You Do in the War, Daddy? (1966)
Story
The Great Race (1965)
Story
A Shot in the Dark (1964)
Screenwriter
The Pink Panther (1964)
Screenwriter
Soldier in the Rain (1963)
Screenwriter
The Couch (1962)
Story
The Notorious Landlady (1962)
Screenwriter
This Happy Feeling (1958)
Screenwriter
Mister Cory (1957)
Screenwriter
Operation Mad Ball (1957)
Screenwriter
He Laughed Last (1956)
Screenwriter
He Laughed Last (1956)
Story
My Sister Eileen (1955)
Screenwriter
Bring Your Smile Along (1955)
Screenwriter
Bring Your Smile Along (1955)
Story
Drive a Crooked Road (1954)
Screenwriter
The Atomic Kid (1954)
Story
All Ashore (1953)
Screenwriter
Cruisin' Down the River (1953)
Story and Screenplay
All Ashore (1953)
Story
Sound Off (1952)
Writer
Rainbow 'Round My Shoulder (1952)
Writer
Stampede (1949)
Screenwriter
Panhandle (1948)
Writer

Producer (Feature Film)

Peter Gunn (1989)
Executive Producer
Justin Case (1988)
Executive Producer
Curse of the Pink Panther (1983)
Producer
The Man who Loved Women (1983)
Producer
Victor/Victoria (1982)
Producer
Trail of the Pink Panther (1982)
Producer
S.O.B. (1981)
Executive Producer
10 (1979)
Producer
Revenge of The Pink Panther (1978)
Producer
The Pink Panther Strikes Again (1976)
Producer
The Return Of The Pink Panther (1975)
Producer
Wild Rovers (1971)
Producer
Darling Lili (1970)
Producer
The Party (1968)
Producer
What Did You Do in the War, Daddy? (1966)
Producer
A Shot in the Dark (1964)
Producer
Experiment in Terror (1962)
Producer
Stampede (1949)
Producer
Panhandle (1948)
Producer

Production Companies (Feature Film)

Darling Lili (1970)
Company
The Party (1968)
Company
Gunn (1967)
Company
Waterhole #3 (1967)
Company
A Shot in the Dark (1964)
Company
The Pink Panther (1964)
Company
Soldier in the Rain (1963)
Company
Experiment in Terror (1962)
Company

Misc. Crew (Feature Film)

Casino (1980)
Creative Consultant

Director (Special)

Victor/Victoria (2000)
Stage Director
Julie -- My Favorite Things (1975)
Director
Julie and Dick in Covent Garden (1974)
Director
Julie! (1972)
Director

Cast (Special)

Intimate Portrait: Bo Derek (2003)
James Garner: A Maverick Spirit (2000)
Bo Derek: The E! True Hollywood Story (1999)
Monica Mancini... On Record (1998)
Interviewee
Audrey Hepburn: The Fairest Lady (1997)
Interviewee
Bruce Lee: The Immortal Dragon (1997)
Jack Lemmon (1996)
Julie Andrews: Back on Broadway (1995)
Dudley Moore (1994)
Laurel & Hardy: A Tribute to the Boys (1992)
The 2nd Annual American Comedy Awards (1988)
Performer
The World's Greatest Stunts: A Tribute to Hollywood's Stuntmen (1988)
Mancini and Friends (1987)

Writer (Special)

Victor/Victoria (2000)
Writer
Victor/Victoria (2000)
From Original Screenplay
Julie -- My Favorite Things (1975)
Writer

Producer (Special)

Victor/Victoria (2000)
Producer
Julie and Dick in Covent Garden (1974)
Executive Producer
Julie on Sesame Street (1973)
Executive Producer
Julie! (1972)
Producer

Special Thanks (Special)

Victor/Victoria (2000)
Writer
Victor/Victoria (2000)
From Original Screenplay
Julie -- My Favorite Things (1975)
Writer

Cast (Short)

The Moviemakers (1971)
Himself

Life Events

1942

Film acting debut (bit part) in "Ten Gentlemen from West Point"

1948

Final film as an actor "Panhandle"

1948

First film as co-writer (with Lesley Selander) and producer, "Panhandle" (also actor)

1953

TV debut as a writer, "Hey Mulligan"

1953

TV debut as a producer, "City Detective"

1955

Film directing debut, "Bring Your Smile Along" (also writer; songwriter)

1958

First collaboration with Henry Mancini, "Peter Gunn"

1958

TV debut as a director (also creator, producer and writer), "Peter Gunn"

1964

First collaboration with Peter Sellers, "The Pink Panther"

1975

First collaboration with Tony Adams (as producer), "Return of the Pink Panther"

1978

Final film with Peter Sellers, "Revenge of the Pink Panther"

1981

Had box office hit with "S.O.B."

1982

Scored international success with "Victor/Victoria"

1992

Executive producer of short-lived ABC series for Julie Andrews, "Julie"

1993

Returned to the "Pink Panther" series with "Son of the Pink Panther"

1995

Had Broadway box office success with "Victor/Victoria: The Musical"; final collaboration with Henry Mancini

Photo Collections

Drive a Crooked Road - Behind-the-Scenes Photos
Drive a Crooked Road - Behind-the-Scenes Photos
Experiment in Terror - Movie Poster
Here is an original release movie poster from Columbia's Experiment in Terror (1962), directed by Blake Edwards. This is an Insert poster, measuring 14 x 36 inches.
Breakfast at Tiffany's - Movie Poster
Here is the American One-Sheet Movie Poster from Breakfast at Tiffany's (1961), starring Audrey Hepburn. One-sheets measured 27x41 inches, and were the poster style most commonly used in theaters. This particular poster is one of the most iconic images of the early 1960s and is highly prized by collectors.

Videos

Movie Clip

Pink Panther Strikes Again, The - Does Your Dog Bite? That's Graham Stark, pal of Peter Sellers and a regular in the series, as the "idiot" clerk at a Swiss hotel in a famous gag with "Inspector Clouseau," from The Pink Panther Strikes Again, 1976.
Pink Panther Strikes Again, The - 40 Winks Satisfied that man-servant Cato (Burt Kwouk) is not lurking, and unaware of Dreyfus (Herbert Lom) stalking from downstairs, Clouseau (Peter Sellers) settles in for a nap in The Pink Panther Strikes Again 1976.
That's Life! (1986) - They Be Dumb Dropped off after hitching a ride due to car trouble at his Malibu mansion (the real home of writer-director-producer Blake Edwards, in his independently-financed feature), architect Harvey (Jack Lemmon) doesn't ask how his actress wife Gillian (Julie Andrews, also Mrs. Edwards) is doing, though we know she’s waiting on a cancer test, early in That’s Life, 1986.
That's Life! (1986) - I'll Be So Delicious In a shot writer-producer-director Blake Edwards needed several days to get, due to fog on the beach at his own Malibu home, actress Gillian (Julia Andrews, Mrs. Edwards), secretly awaiting results of a cancer test, meets friend and realtor Molly (Sally Kellerman) exercising, in That’s Life, 1986.
That's Life! (1986) - Open, The First One's Painless Opening with sounds of surgery under the credits, from writer-director Blake Edwards, his leading lady (Julie Andrews, Edwards’ wife) gets a cancer test, attended by a real Beverly Hills clinician (Charles Schneider) and reassured by friend Keith (Jordan Christopher), in That’s Life, 1986, also starring Jack Lemmon.
That's Life! (1986) - Success Breeds Failure At a posh Malibu restaurant, architect Harvey (Jack Lemmon), going bonkers as his 60th birthday looms, ruminates about a demanding client and his own angst, his actress wife Gillian (Julie Andrews, spouse of writer-director Blake Edwards) riding it out, in That’s Life, 1986.
Shot In The Dark, A (1964) - Back On The Case Snoozing Inspector Clouseau (Peter Sellers) inevitably leads to his first clash with his man Kato (Burt Kwouk), and a call from the boss (Herbert Lom), in Blake Edwards' first Pink Panther sequel, A Shot In The Dark, 1964.
Shot In The Dark, A (1964) - This Pen Has Been Fired Recently First appearance of Peter Sellers as Inspector Clouseau, in the first sequel to The Pink Panther, 1964, Graham Stark his aide, meeting Lafarge (Douglas Wilmer), big-shot Ballon (George Sanders), Maurice (Martin Benson) and Elke Sommer as Maria at the murder site, in Blake Edwards’ A Shot In The Dark, 1964.
Experiment In Terror (1962) - Meet Me At The Roaring Twenties Teller Kelly (Lee Remick) takes a call from master criminal Red (Ross Martin), her threatened sister Tobi (Stefanie Powers) frolics at the pool and FBI-man Ripley (Glenn Ford) frets, in Blake Edwards' Experiment In Terror, 1962.
10 -- (1979) - I Forgot My Tutu Remarkable exchange, candid in the extreme but with language no longer socially acceptable, Dudley Moore as top Hollywood composer George, working in Malibu with his gay professional partner Hugh (Robert Webber), tangling over the latter’s lover (Walter George Alton), in writer-director Blake Edwards’ 10, 1979.
10 -- (1979) - The Very Best Of Men Must Roam Headed home through Beverly Hills, top Hollywood composer George (Dudley Moore), listening his movie star girlfriend (Julie Andrews, wife of writer-director Blake Edwards, as Samantha) performing a song he presumably wrote (though it’s actually an original by Henry Mancini and Robert Wells), discovers the title character (Bo Derek), and a cop (Bill Lucking), in 10, 1979.
10 -- (1979) - She's Always Busy Still trying to reconcile with movie and musical star girlfriend Sam (Julie Andrews) after a fight, and indulging in more fleshy Hollywood Hills telescope voyeurism (Don Calfa his show-off neighbor), even as he subtly pursues the title character (Bo Derek), famous composer George (Dudley Moore) dives into director Blake Edwards’ trademark physical comedy, in 10, 1979.

Trailer

Pink Panther Strikes Again, The (1976) -- (Original Trailer) Featuring scripted participation by Herbert Lom as his now driven-bonkers former boss, Peter Sellers with many gags and co-stars (Burk Kwouk as Cato, Lesley-Anne Down as Olga) in the theatrical trailer for his fifth (and last-completed) Inspector Clouseau movie, The Pink Panther Strikes Again, 1976.
Return Of The Pink Panther, The (1975) -- (Original Trailer) Original trailer for the hit revival-sequel, initiated by Sir Lew Grade, produced and directed by Blake Edwards, and starring Peter Sellers as Inspector Clouseay, The Return Of The Pink Panther, 1975.
S.O.B. (1981) -- (Original Trailer) Emphasis on the writer-director, his wife Julie Andrews, his company of Hollywood veteran pals, and Robert Preston getting the best lines, the original trailer for Blake Edwards’ indulgent satire, S.O.B., 1981.
Great Race, The - (Original Trailer) A bumbling villain (Jack Lemmon) plots to win an early 20th-century auto race in Blake Edwards' The Great Race (1965).
Drive A Crooked Road - (Original Trailer) A mechanic (Mickey Rooney) gets caught up with the mob when he falls for a gangster's girlfriend in Drive A Crooked Road (1954).
Darling Lili - (Original Trailer) A World War I flyer (Rock Hudson) falls for a beautiful enemy spy (Julie Andrews). Directed by Blake Edwards.
Pink Panther, The - (Original Trailer) Inspector Clouseau (Peter Sellers) tries to stop a notorious jewel thief from nabbing a princess's diamond in The Pink Panther (1964), directed by Blake Edwards.
Notorious Landlady, The - (Original Trailer) Jack Lemmon, Kim Novak and Fred Astaire star in The Notorious Landlady (1962) about a diplomat who falls for a murder suspect.
Breakfast at Tiffany's - (Original Trailer) Audrey Hepburn is Truman Capote's Holly Golightly, the New York sophisticate who spends Breakfast at Tiffany's (1961).
Revenge of the Pink Panther - (Original Trailer) Peter Sellars gave his last performance as Inspector Clouseau in Revenge of the Pink Panther (1978).
Victor/Victoria - (Original Trailer) An unemployed female singer poses as a female impersonator and becomes a star in Victor/Victoria (1982), directed by Blake Edwards and starring Julie Andrews, James Garner and Robert Preston.
Shot In The Dark, A (1964) - (Original Trailer) In his second adventure, Inspector Clouseau (Peter Sellers) must solve a murder while avoiding an ambushing manservant and a twitching superior.

Promo

Family

Gordon J Edwards
Grandfather
Director. Died 1925.
Donald Crump
Father
Writer. Birth father.
Jack McEdwards
Father
Former actor, writer, production manager, assistant director. Adoptive father; born c. 1897, died on March 9, 1992 in L.A.; adopted Edwards after marrying his mother; worked on many of son's films; production credits included "The Man With the Golden Arm", "Advise and Consent", "I Want to Live", "Days of Wine and Roses" and "The Great Race".
Lillian McEdwards
Mother
Philanthropist. Born c. 1899; died October 9, 1990 at age 91; founder of the Screen Smart Set, auxiliary that benefits the Motion Picture & TV Fund.
Geoffrey Edwards
Son
Screenwriter. Born in 1958; while a child appeared in some of father's films; then collaborated with father on several screenplays in the 1980s; mother Patricia Walker.
Jennifer Edwards
Daughter
Actor. In several films by father; mother Patricia Walker.
Amy Leigh Edwards
Daughter
Vietnamese orphan adopted with Julie Andrews.
Joanna Lynne Edwards
Daughter
Vietnamese orphan adopted with Julie Andrews.

Companions

Patricia Walker
Wife
Actor. Divorced in 1967.
Julie Andrews
Wife
Actor; author. Married on November 12, 1969; met on the set of "Darling Lili" (1970), married shortly after filmming.

Bibliography

Notes

Edwards used the pseudonym Sam O Brown for his story and screenplay for the film "City Heat" (1984).

Edwards is connected by marriages to the family of screen great Douglas Fairbanks. Donald Crump, Edwards' natural father, was the brother-in-law of Lucile Fairbanks Crump, niece of Douglas Fairbanks and Fairbanks family historian.

"In what business in the world can you have more fun, be creative while you're having fun, be funny and work at being funny, work really nice hours and get paid a lot of money for doing it?" --Blake Edwards in THE HOLLYWOOD REPORTER tribute to him.

"He's easygoing as opposed to other directors who dictate and take away the spontaneity." --Dudley Moore

"Before I became a director, when I would go to another country and go through customs, the airlines handed out little cards for your to fill out. I wrote 'writer'. Now I write 'writer-director'. But the great thing about being a writer is that it's not limited to a soundsage and equipment and a crew of people. I wrote 'S.O.B.' in the middle of the Alps." --Blake Edwards

"He has great taste. He married Julie." --James Garner