My Buddy


1h 7m 1944

Brief Synopsis

Republic, never a company to not try getting ahead of the curve and with writers who could remember the 1930's social conscience WW I vets-returning-home films, made this in mid-1944 (a full year before the end of WW II) as a don't-let-it-happen-again sermon. The semi-prologue opening finds Father Jim Donnelly (John Litel) before a post-war planning board in Washington and, as Priests quite often did in 1930 and 1940's films, tells his point-making story in flashback of how WW I vet Eddie Ballinger (Don Barry as Donald Barry), shaken by battle experiences anyway, returns home to a job that is no longer there for him and finds "No Help Wanted" signs standing in his way of making an honest living. Despite the pleas from his mother (Emma Dunn) and his sweetheart Lucy Manners (Lynne Roberts), Eddie starts hauling booze for bootlegger Tim Oberta (Alexander Granich) and takes up with entertainer Lola (Ruth Terry), who eventually betrays him, mainly because she is a one-name character and that's what one-name characters are there for...especially in a movie with the lead playing his 1944 version of Jimmy Cagney in a 1933 Warner's film. Father Jim makes his don't-repeat-the-past point in less than an hour as the hearing committee had also seen and heard the story before.

Film Details

Release Date
Oct 12, 1944
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Republic Pictures Corp.
Distribution Company
Republic Pictures Corp.
Country
United States

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 7m
Sound
Mono (RCA Sound System)
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1
Film Length
7 reels

Synopsis

Father Jim Donnelly travels from Chicago to Washington, D.C. to testify before Senator Bill Henry's Post-War Planning Committee. To illustrate his point that World War II veterans must have jobs waiting for them upon their return from fighting, Father Donnelly tells the story of Eddie Ballinger, a former parishioner and World War I veteran: On 11 Nov 1918, Eddie and his pal Spats are trapped on the battlefield by a German sniper, who is keeping them pinned down in their trench. Spats sings "My Buddy" to assuage their nerves, but when he stands up, the sniper shoots and kills him. Before Eddie can return fire, he receives word that the war is over. Back home in Chicago, Eddie's mother Mary is thrilled to see him, although Eddie is shocked to learn that she has been taking in laundry to make ends meet. Eddie also goes to see his girl friend, Lucy Manners, who has patiently waited for him. Eddie asks Lucy to wait a little longer for their marriage, until he finds a job and readjusts to civilian life. Despite Eddie's persistence and good intentions, he cannot find a job, as very few employers held positions for workers who went off to war. Desperate to provide for Mary and Lucy, Eddie finally accepts a job working for Tim Oberta, a racketeer and bootlegger. Lucy asks Eddie to quit, but Eddie continues with his illegal activities and is able to install Mary in a comfortable new apartment. Later, Eddie is helping to deliver a truckload of gin when an investigating policeman is accidentally killed. Oberta double-crosses Eddie during his trial, and Eddie is convicted and sentenced to five years in prison. The bitter Eddie then begins to lay plans for his own criminal empire during his imprisonment. Lucy visits Eddie, but he cruelly tells her to go on with her life and marry a respectable, boring man. Upon his release in 1924, Eddie moves in on Oberta's territory and soon has control of the westside protection racket. Eddie begins keeping company with Lola, a duplicitous nightclub performer who left Oberta for him. Mary pleads with Eddie to quit terrorizing the shopkeepers for protection money, but Eddie refuses, for he is still angry over their refusals to employ him when he returned from overseas. Eddie's empire grows, but a spy for Oberta helps him to set up and murder several of Eddie's men, and in revenge, Eddie shoots Oberta. After the shooting, Eddie leaves a valise at Donnelly's church, then goes to the hotel, where Lola is waiting for him. Lola has called the police, however, and Eddie is killed in the ensuing shootout. At the conclusion of his story, Donnelly tells the senators that Eddie's valise contained money to be returned to the store owners, and a note begging Donnelly to help provide for the men and women who will be serving their country in the future. Moved by the saga of Eddie's downfall, the senators promise Donnelly that they will do all they can to insure job security for returning veterans.

Film Details

Release Date
Oct 12, 1944
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Republic Pictures Corp.
Distribution Company
Republic Pictures Corp.
Country
United States

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 7m
Sound
Mono (RCA Sound System)
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1
Film Length
7 reels

Quotes

Trivia

Notes

The following written dedication appears after the opening credits: "This picture is dedicated to our boys and girls in the armed forces and to the task of reminding us that we must prepare our great land for their return to civilian life, so that they shall come back free men and women to a land of peace and security and equal opportunity for all." The popular 1920s song "My Buddy" was not written until 1922, although in the film it is sung in 1918, at the end of World War I. "Eddie" identifies the song with his fallen comrade, "Spats," and is reminded of Spats when he hears the song again while serving time in prison. Although Hollywood Reporter production charts include Kenne Duncan in the cast, his appearance in the completed film has not been confirmed. According to information in the MPAA/PCA Collection at the AMPAS Library, the PCA rejected a April 1, 1944 version of the script, stating that it contained "gangster activities in violation of the special regulations re crime in motion pictures" and also "an illicit sex affair." A revised script was approved by the PCA in May 1944, although the office advised Republic to emphasize that "Eddie was not typical of the returned soldiers," but was instead a special case worthy of the attention of the senatorial committee.