Trail of the Pink Panther


1h 37m 1982

Brief Synopsis

A television reporter tries to get to the real story behind Inspector Clouseau.

Film Details

Also Known As
Jakten på Rosa Pantern
MPAA Rating
Genre
Comedy
Action
Mystery
Sequel
Release Date
1982

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 37m

Synopsis

Inspector Jacques Clouseau is missing! And so is the Pink Panther diamond.

Crew

Tony Adams

Producer

Roy Alon

Stunt Man

David Appleby

Photography

Ron Baker

Production

Ken Barker

Dubbing Mixer

David Beesley

Assistant Editor

Lucy Boulting

Casting Director

Nacio Herb Brown

Music

Derek Browne

Camera Operator

Mike Bulley

Loader

Dick Bush

Director Of Photography

Dick Bush

Dp/Cinematographer

Trish Caroselli

Assistant

Roy Charman

Sound Mixer

Michel Cheyko

Assistant Director

Marilyn Clarke

Continuity

Bryan Coates

Location Manager

Frank Connor

Photography

J. Fred Coots

Music

Ray Corbett

Assistant Director

Tony Cridlin

Grip

Jackie Cummins

Wardrobe

Danny Daniel

Sound Mixer

Gordon Danniels

Sound Editor

David H Depatie

Characters As Source Material

Martin Dias

Wardrobe

Joe Dunne

Stunts

Blake Edwards

Producer

Blake Edwards

Story By

Blake Edwards

Screenplay

Geoffrey Edwards

Screenplay

Patricia Edwards

Costume Designer

Paul Engelen

Makeup Artist

John Evans

Special Effects Supervisor

Neil Farrell

Assistant Editor

Harry Frampton

Makeup Artist

Peter Frampton

Makeup Artist

Arthur Freed

Music Lyrics

I. Freleng

Characters As Source Material

Nigel Galt

Assistant Editor

George Gibbs

Special Effects Supervisor

Haven Gillespie

Music Lyrics

Tony Graysmark

Construction Manager

Oscar Hammerstein Ii

Music Lyrics

John Harris

Camera Operator

Bob Hathaway

Music Editor

John Hayward

Dubbing Mixer

Bernard Hearn

Props

Mike Heaviside

Camera Operator

Tim Hutchinson

Art Director

John Isaacs

Consultant

Joyce James

Hairdresser

Denis Johnson

Production Supervisor

Denis Johnson

Project Manager

Alan Jones

Editor

Dave Jordan

Property Master

Lesley Keane

Assistant

Stephen Keith-roach

Loader

Peter Kohn

Assistant Director

Jonathan D Krane

Executive Producer

Damien Lanfranchi

Art Department

Richard H Langford

Dubbing Mixer

Art Leonardi

Animation Director

Art Leonardi

Animator

Ruth Lowe

Song

Henry Mancini

Music

Terry Marcel

Unit Director

Ted Mason

Sound Editor

Bernard Mazauric

Production Manager

Caroline Mazauric

Casting

Roger Mcdonald

Camera Focus Puller

Peter Mullins

Production Designer

Michael Murray

Assistant Director

Tiny Nicholls

Costume Supervisor

Gerald T Nutting

Associate Producer

Bill Osbourne

Grip

George Pearman

Electrician

Kieron Phipps

Assistant Director

George Rice

Sound Engineer

Bob Risk

Assistant Sound Editor

Michael Roberts

Camera Operator

Jim Roddan

Sound Editor

Richard Rodgers

Music

John Salter

Boom Operator

Elaine Schreyeck

Continuity

Mary Selway

Casting

John Siddall

Art Director

Vic Simpson

Construction Manager

Bobbie Smith

Hairdresser

Doreen Soan

Continuity

Bernard Spence

Production Accountant

Jack Stephens

Set Decorator

Joe Swift

Propman

Francine Taylor

Assistant

Alan Tomkins

Art Director

Joyce Turner

Production Assistant

Daphne Vollmer

Hairdresser

Frank Waldman

Screenplay

Tom Waldman

Screenplay

Robert Webster

Electrician

Tony Wheeler

Propman

David Wynn-jones

Camera Focus Puller

Film Details

Also Known As
Jakten på Rosa Pantern
MPAA Rating
Genre
Comedy
Action
Mystery
Sequel
Release Date
1982

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 37m

Articles

Trail of the Pink Panther


When Peter Sellers reunited with director Blake Edwards to revive their hapless Gallic detective Inspector Jacques Clouseau after an 11-year screen absence in The Return of the Pink Panther (1975), the resulting box-office success served to pull both men out of respective career funks. It's small wonder that they each opted to swiftly return to the well with The Pink Panther Strikes Again (1976) and Revenge of the Pink Panther (1978), even if the comedic returns on the formula waned with each successive outing. With Sellers' untimely death in 1980, it seemed like the Clouseau comedies, so closely dependent on his classic characterization, would follow the chameleon-like performer into cinema history. Edwards, for his part, wasn't ready to let go, and started his bid to continue the Clouseau legacy with Trail of the Pink Panther (1982).

Edwards' gambit for this professed elegy to "Peter...the one and only Inspector Clouseau," as per the film's dedication, was to weave a new-footage narrative around unearthed out-takes and selected scenes from their five prior Clouseau efforts. The opening action once again concerns the fabulous Pink Panther diamond, purloined yet again from its safekeeping in the mythical emirate of Lugash, whose government has entreated Clouseau to ensure its recovery. Roughly the first half of the movie depicts the inspector's journey to London for surveillance on his old nemesis Charles Litton (David Niven, whose own declining health necessitated having his dialogue looped by Rich Little), interspersed with psychiatric sessions for Herbert Lom as Clouseau's driven-around-the bend superior Dreyfus. The unused footage includes a bizarre sequence with Clouseau, encumbered by an improbable fake full-leg cast, attempting to negotiate an airliner lavatory.

It's at this point that the plane bearing Clouseau to Lugash vanishes without a trace, and the balance of the film follows the efforts of a French TV journalist (Joanna Lumley) to gain perspective on the missing hero via interviews with those who knew him best. The roster whose recollections are captured includes Dreyfus, Litton, the Lady Litton/ex-Mrs. Clouseau (Capucine), and Cato (Burt Kwouk), as well as series regulars Graham Stark and Andre Maranne. Newer faces include Harvey Korman as Clouseau's disguise armorer, Robert Loggia as a mob boss, and a very effective Richard Mulligan as the inspector's aged father. When all's said and done, the reporter finds herself no closer to finding the man himself. Cut to a seaside cliff of indeterminate location, where a familiar, trench-coated figure stands back to camera, wiping off gull droppings. He turns, and...

If nothing else, Trail of the Pink Panther rewards the Sellers devotee who'll enjoy both the highlights of the earlier films and the unused footage that may have otherwise never have come to light. Edwards immediately followed up with Curse of the Pink Panther (1983), which involved the further hunt for Clouseau, wrapped around the effort to push Ted Wass as a new bumbling cop hero, Sgt. Clifton Sleigh. Many of the players from the new Trail sequences returned, but the end results weren't satisfying. Beyond having the box-office drop precipitously from the '70s Panther films, it seems like the biggest beneficiaries of these enterprises were attorneys. MGM/UA ultimately settled out of court with Sellers' widow, actress Lynne Frederick, for using the Trail footage without permission; the studio thereafter wound up facing suit from Edwards over having allegedly devalued the franchise with their marketing of the latter films.

The strength of Sellers' identification with the role was so overpowering, though, that public resistance to any continuance of the series in his absence seems unsurprising in retrospect, no matter how accomplished the comic performer taking the pratfalls. Alan Arkin's turn in the title role of Inspector Clouseau (1968) has and continues to be largely treated as non-canonical; Edwards' last bite of the apple, Son of the Pink Panther (1993), which offered Roberto Benigni as the inspector's illegitimate offspring, failed to resuscitate the franchise. It probably took the fullness of time, as well as a dearth of relatively family-friendly comedy fare, to allow the acceptance that Steve Martin found when he assumed the mantle with the series' 2006 relaunch.

Producers: Tony Adams and Blake Edwards
Director: Blake Edwards
Screenplay: Frank Waldman, Tom Waldman, Blake Edwards, Geoffrey Edwards; Blake Edwards (story)
Cinematography: Dick Bush
Art Direction: Tim Hutchinson, John Siddall, Alan Tomkins
Music: Henry Mancini
Film Editing: Alan Jones
Cast: Peter Sellers (Chief Insp. Jacques Clouseau), David Niven (Sir Charles Litton), Herbert Lom (Chief Insp. Charles Dreyfus), Richard Mulligan (Clouseau's father), Joanna Lumley (Marie Jouvet), Robert Loggia (Bruno Langois).
C-97m. Letterboxed. Closed captioning.

by Jay S. Steinberg
Trail Of The Pink Panther

Trail of the Pink Panther

When Peter Sellers reunited with director Blake Edwards to revive their hapless Gallic detective Inspector Jacques Clouseau after an 11-year screen absence in The Return of the Pink Panther (1975), the resulting box-office success served to pull both men out of respective career funks. It's small wonder that they each opted to swiftly return to the well with The Pink Panther Strikes Again (1976) and Revenge of the Pink Panther (1978), even if the comedic returns on the formula waned with each successive outing. With Sellers' untimely death in 1980, it seemed like the Clouseau comedies, so closely dependent on his classic characterization, would follow the chameleon-like performer into cinema history. Edwards, for his part, wasn't ready to let go, and started his bid to continue the Clouseau legacy with Trail of the Pink Panther (1982). Edwards' gambit for this professed elegy to "Peter...the one and only Inspector Clouseau," as per the film's dedication, was to weave a new-footage narrative around unearthed out-takes and selected scenes from their five prior Clouseau efforts. The opening action once again concerns the fabulous Pink Panther diamond, purloined yet again from its safekeeping in the mythical emirate of Lugash, whose government has entreated Clouseau to ensure its recovery. Roughly the first half of the movie depicts the inspector's journey to London for surveillance on his old nemesis Charles Litton (David Niven, whose own declining health necessitated having his dialogue looped by Rich Little), interspersed with psychiatric sessions for Herbert Lom as Clouseau's driven-around-the bend superior Dreyfus. The unused footage includes a bizarre sequence with Clouseau, encumbered by an improbable fake full-leg cast, attempting to negotiate an airliner lavatory. It's at this point that the plane bearing Clouseau to Lugash vanishes without a trace, and the balance of the film follows the efforts of a French TV journalist (Joanna Lumley) to gain perspective on the missing hero via interviews with those who knew him best. The roster whose recollections are captured includes Dreyfus, Litton, the Lady Litton/ex-Mrs. Clouseau (Capucine), and Cato (Burt Kwouk), as well as series regulars Graham Stark and Andre Maranne. Newer faces include Harvey Korman as Clouseau's disguise armorer, Robert Loggia as a mob boss, and a very effective Richard Mulligan as the inspector's aged father. When all's said and done, the reporter finds herself no closer to finding the man himself. Cut to a seaside cliff of indeterminate location, where a familiar, trench-coated figure stands back to camera, wiping off gull droppings. He turns, and... If nothing else, Trail of the Pink Panther rewards the Sellers devotee who'll enjoy both the highlights of the earlier films and the unused footage that may have otherwise never have come to light. Edwards immediately followed up with Curse of the Pink Panther (1983), which involved the further hunt for Clouseau, wrapped around the effort to push Ted Wass as a new bumbling cop hero, Sgt. Clifton Sleigh. Many of the players from the new Trail sequences returned, but the end results weren't satisfying. Beyond having the box-office drop precipitously from the '70s Panther films, it seems like the biggest beneficiaries of these enterprises were attorneys. MGM/UA ultimately settled out of court with Sellers' widow, actress Lynne Frederick, for using the Trail footage without permission; the studio thereafter wound up facing suit from Edwards over having allegedly devalued the franchise with their marketing of the latter films. The strength of Sellers' identification with the role was so overpowering, though, that public resistance to any continuance of the series in his absence seems unsurprising in retrospect, no matter how accomplished the comic performer taking the pratfalls. Alan Arkin's turn in the title role of Inspector Clouseau (1968) has and continues to be largely treated as non-canonical; Edwards' last bite of the apple, Son of the Pink Panther (1993), which offered Roberto Benigni as the inspector's illegitimate offspring, failed to resuscitate the franchise. It probably took the fullness of time, as well as a dearth of relatively family-friendly comedy fare, to allow the acceptance that Steve Martin found when he assumed the mantle with the series' 2006 relaunch. Producers: Tony Adams and Blake Edwards Director: Blake Edwards Screenplay: Frank Waldman, Tom Waldman, Blake Edwards, Geoffrey Edwards; Blake Edwards (story) Cinematography: Dick Bush Art Direction: Tim Hutchinson, John Siddall, Alan Tomkins Music: Henry Mancini Film Editing: Alan Jones Cast: Peter Sellers (Chief Insp. Jacques Clouseau), David Niven (Sir Charles Litton), Herbert Lom (Chief Insp. Charles Dreyfus), Richard Mulligan (Clouseau's father), Joanna Lumley (Marie Jouvet), Robert Loggia (Bruno Langois). C-97m. Letterboxed. Closed captioning. by Jay S. Steinberg

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States Winter December 1, 1982

Released in USA on video.

Actor Peter Sellers died of a heart attack on July 24th, 1980. This posthumous installment of Blake Edwards' successful comedy film series was created from outtake footage, reprised clips and new connective footage. The film is dedicated: "To Peter... the one and only Inspector Clouseau."

Released in United States Winter December 1, 1982