Too Many Parents


1h 13m 1936

Film Details

Release Date
Mar 20, 1936
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Paramount Productions, Inc.
Distribution Company
Paramount Productions, Inc.
Country
United States
Screenplay Information
Based on the unpublished story "Too Many Parents" by George Templeton and the short story "Not Wanted" by Jesse Lynch Williams in The Saturday Evening Post (17 Nov 1923).

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 13m
Sound
Mono
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1
Film Length
8 reels

Synopsis

Four neglected children are enrolled at Colman Military Academy: Clarence Talbot, Jr., a mischievous bully who has inherited $10,000,000 from his deceased parents; little Billy Miller, whose life has been led backstage because his theatrical parents have no other place for him; Clinton Meadows, who, during his parents' custody battle, elected to attend school for one year and have the judge be his guardian; and Philip Stewart, whose mother died in childbirth, and whose engineer father, Mark, neglects Philip while traveling the world for his work. The boys find parental guidance and love from Sally, the receptionist who is also the daughter of Colonel Colman, and from Wilkins, the much-loved and well-respected janitor. Although Clarence, who wants to be called "Butch," starts out as a bully, after he receives punishment for a lie, he soon gains the friendship of the other boys and slowly mends his way. He originally attended the school on a bet with his guardian, who said he would not last one week, but finally having found peers, Clarence chooses to stay at the academy. Philip is promoted to lieutenant, of which he is very proud, but his fondest wish is to see his father. His wish comes true when his father telegrams him to take a week's leave and visit him in New York City. Sally accompanies the boy to New York, and discovers his father is kindly, but uncertain how to handle a son he has not seen in years. Philip is overjoyed to see his father, who gives him some stationery from his office, but his visit is cut short when his father is called to Washington. Back at school, Philip, who wants to be a writer, begins writing himself letters from his father so that Sally and the boys will think his father loves him. Christmas comes, and the boys spend the holiday with a buddy and his family, having no place to go themselves. After New Year, Philip receives a telegram informing him that his father will attend father-son night, for which Philip has written a play, but Mark never appears, and Philip is heartbroken. Later, it is revealed that Philip has been writing the letters that come from his father. Since Colonel Colman is away, one of the professors takes it upon himself to exact punishment. The professor demotes Philip, stripping him of his rank in a ceremony before all the other students. Knowing this will break Philip's heart, Sally wires Mark to come to the Academy. He arrives in time to see Philip demoted, and crushed by his father's appearance at this humiliating event, Philip runs away and hides in a canoe. His friends follow him, and apprise Sally, Mark, Wilkins and the newly arrived Colonel Colman that Philip is in danger. Mark bravely leaps into the dam after Philip's canoe goes over the falls, and rescues his son. Finally aware that his son needs him, Mark takes Philip and his friends on a camping trip with Sally, who has become Mark's wife.

Film Details

Release Date
Mar 20, 1936
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Paramount Productions, Inc.
Distribution Company
Paramount Productions, Inc.
Country
United States
Screenplay Information
Based on the unpublished story "Too Many Parents" by George Templeton and the short story "Not Wanted" by Jesse Lynch Williams in The Saturday Evening Post (17 Nov 1923).

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 13m
Sound
Mono
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1
Film Length
8 reels

Quotes

Trivia

Notes

According to a Hollywood Reporter production chart, David Holt was scheduled to appear in the film. This was actress Frances Farmer's first film. For further information on her career, see the note for Come and Get It (above).