The Mambo Kings


1h 41m 1992

Brief Synopsis

Two Cuban brothers fight small-time crooks to make their Latin band a hit.

Film Details

Also Known As
Mambo Kings
MPAA Rating
Genre
Drama
Musical
Music
Adaptation
Release Date
1992
Production Company
Joel Shryack
Distribution Company
WARNER BROS. PICTURES DISTRIBUTION (WBPD)
Location
Los Angeles, California, USA; Miami, Florida, USA; Minnesota, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 41m

Synopsis

A story about two Cuban musician brothers who go to New York City in the late 1940s to play in dance halls.

Crew

Harold Adamson

Song

Pedro Aguilar

Research And Content Consultant

Peter Aguilar

Research And Content Consultant

Mark Allan

Unit Production Manager

Hector Angulo

Music

Albert Aquino

Boom Operator

Henry Medina Archives

Photography

Peter Asher

Song

Lester Ayala

Production Assistant

Florian Ballhaus

Assistant Camera Operator

Jan Sebastian Ballhaus

Assistant Director

Michael Ballhaus

Director Of Photography

Edward Bates

Production Assistant

Mario Bauza

Song

Paul Baxley

Stunt Coordinator

Shauna Beal

Assistant

Cheryl Beasley-blackwell

Costumes

Jack B Bernstein

Coproducer

Elisha Birnbaum

Foley Artist

Kim Blank

Other

Harry Peck Bolles

Adr Editor

David Boulton

Adr

Ernesto Duarte Brito

Song

John P Bruce

Set Designer

Kristine Bulakowski

Adr Editor

Gary Burritt

Negative Cutting

Irving Caesar

Song

Charlie Canderlaria

Research And Content Consultant

David Carbonara

Music Editor

Robert Chambers

Assistant Location Manager

Anthony Ciccolini

Sound Editor

Cynthia Cidre

Screenplay

Bryan Constans

Production Assistant

Joe Conzo

Technical Advisor

M Kam Cooney

Special Effects Coordinator

Celia Cruz

Song Performer

J Patrick Daily

Key Grip

Eliot Daniel

Song

Elliot Deitch

Sound Editor

Fernandez Diaz

Song

Lee Dichter

Sound Re-Recording Mixer

Alberto Dominquez

Song

Milly Donay

Research And Content Consultant

Thomas Drescher

Music Editor

David Dunlap

Camera Operator

Duke Ellington

Song

Duke Ellington

Song Performer

Sam Emerson

Photography

Bruce Eriksen

Costume Supervisor

Patrick Ewald

Assistant

Bo Falck

Transportation Captain

Simone Farber

Dga Trainee

Michael Farrow

Music

Carl Feaster

Song

Claude Feaster

Song

Emily Ferry

Property Master

Dorothy Fields

Song

Carlos Franzetti

Original Score

Nancy Frazen

Assistant Editor

Eugene Gearty

Sound

Dennis Glass

Makeup Artist

Arne Glimcher

Producer

Arne Glimcher

Song

Arne Glimcher

Song Performer

Ellen Glimcher

Production Assistant

Brett Golin

Research And Content Consultant

Michael Golub

Music

Ann Goulder

Casting Associate

Frank Grillo

Technical Advisor

Debe Hale

Assistant Art Director

Barbara A Hall

Production Coordinator

Ted Hardwick

Swing Gang

Bruce Hauer

Transportation Captain

Oscar Hijuelos

Consultant

Oscar Hijuelos

Source Material (From Novel)

Billy Hopkins

Casting

Adam Ivers

Assistant

Eric R Jacobson

Production Assistant

Gary Jones

Costume Designer

Kent H Jorgenson

Dolly Grip

Neil L Kaufman

Sound Editor

Bridget Kelly

Costume Designer

Christopher Kennedy

Music Editor

Edward Kennedy

Effects Assistant

James Keyes

Song

P W King

Song

Richard King

Assistant Sound Editor

Michael Kirchberger

Sound Editor

Dan Korintus

Music

Robert Kraft

Original Score

Robert Kraft

Music Producer

Robert Kraft

Song

Clare Larson

Assistant Editor

Kara Lindstrom

Set Decorator

Joe Loco

Song Performer

Lynn Mackey

Other

Donna Maloney

Costumes

Jose Marti

Other

Antonio Martinez

Adr Editor

David Mayreis

Costumes

Jane Mcculley

Adr Editor

Jimmy Mchugh

Song

Charles H Mcintyre

Rigging Gaffer

Bill Mclaren

Production Assistant

Floyd Mcrae

Song

Roger D Meryett

Foreman

Arnon Milchan

Producer

Leigh A Miller

Assistant Production Coordinator

Eytan Mirsky

Assistant Sound Editor

Carlos Montaner

Production Assistant

Rick Montgomery

Casting

Noro Morales

Song

Beny More

Song

Beny More

Song Performer

Shawn Murphy

Music

Jose Norman

Song

Josee Norman

Hair Stylist

Valli O'reilly

Makeup

Bitty O'sullivan-smith

Sound Editor

Julian Orbon

Music

Johnny Pacheco

Song

Johnny Pacheco

Music

Dan Parada

Casting

Mercedes Pedroso

Song

Sharon Perl

Production Associate

Michael Peters

Choreographer

Josephine Powell

Technical Advisor

Chilton Price

Song

Tito Puente

Song

Tito Puente

Song Performer

Monti Rainbolt

Swing Gang

Luke Reichle

Production Assistant

Anna Reinhardt

Associate Producer

Steven Reuther

Executive Producer

Gabriel Riera

Consultant

Seth Riggs

Dialogue Coach

Chuck Robert

Swing Gang

Eric L Roberts

Craft Service

Augustin Rodriguez

Song

Gonzalo Roig

Song

Linda Ronstadt

Song Performer

Benjamin Rosenberg

Assistant Director

Ann Roth

Costume Designer

Patti Safian

Art Department Coordinator

Max Salazar

Advisor

John Samson

Construction Coordinator

Michael Samson

Assistant Director

Ernest Sanchez

On-Set Dresser

John Sandau

Lighting

Arturo Sandoval

Song

Arturo Sandoval

Song Performer

Ray Santos

Choreographer

Ray Santos

Music

Ray Santos

Song

Steve Sarlad

Art Director

Dusty Saunders

Transportation Coordinator

Judith Saunders

Script Supervisor

Domenico Savino

Song

Debra Scott

Assistant

Pete Seeger

Music

Diane M Seniw

Assistant Production Accountant

Michael Shore

Assistant Sound Editor

Joel Shryack

Cable Operator

Judy Silberstein

Associate Editor

Claire Simpson

Editor

Jesse Siono

Other

Suzanne Smith

Casting

Jim Solomon

Other

Paul P Soucek

Assistant Sound Editor

Jo Stafford

Song Performer

R Stewart

Song

Dominick Tavella

Foley Mixer

Joy Taylor

Assistant Property Master

Jeffrey S Thorin

Assistant Camera Operator

Susumu Tokunow

Sound

Philip Toolin

Set Designer

James R Tynes

Lighting Technician

Robin Urdang

Music Coordinator

Emma Elena Valdelamar

Song

Brian Vancho

Foley Artist

Maria Virgilio

Assistant

Susan Wagner

Assistant Sound Editor

Dixie Webster

Casting

Tom W West

Dolly Grip

Karen White

Location Manager

Frank Wolf

Music

Stuart Wurtzel

Production Designer

Vincent Youmans

Song

Film Details

Also Known As
Mambo Kings
MPAA Rating
Genre
Drama
Musical
Music
Adaptation
Release Date
1992
Production Company
Joel Shryack
Distribution Company
WARNER BROS. PICTURES DISTRIBUTION (WBPD)
Location
Los Angeles, California, USA; Miami, Florida, USA; Minnesota, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 41m

Award Nominations

Best Song

1992

Articles

The Mambo Kings


Based on Oscar Hijuelos' 1989 Pulitzer Prize-winning novel The Mambo Kings Play Songs of Love, Arne Glimcher's 1992 film The Mambo Kings tells the passionate story of Nestor and Cesar Castillo (Antonio Banderas and Armand Assante), two brothers who flee Cuba in the early 1950s and attempt to make it big as musicians in New York. Cesar embraces their new life in America with gusto and works to put their new band, The Mambo Kings, on the map. Nestor, however, is haunted by the memory of Maria (Talisa Soto), the love he left behind in Cuba, and longs to return home. The Mambo Kings is an exuberant film bursting with color, energy and irresistible music that chronicles the ups and downs of two brothers and their quest for the American Dream.

The Mambo Kings was the first feature film ever directed by Arne Glimcher, a powerful figure in the New York art world and founder of the prestigious Pace Gallery. Throughout his successful career as an art dealer, Glimcher had dabbled in the movie business before as a producer on such films as Gorillas in the Mist (1988) and The Good Mother (1988).

Glimcher was attracted to the subject matter of mambo music, of which he had been a big fan since his youth. When he heard that Oscar Hijuelos was writing a book about mambo, he wanted to read it right away, before it was even published. "I called Oscar," said Glimcher, "and I said, 'I understand you're writing this book on mambo. I'd love to read it.' He delivered it to me on Friday in a cardboard box that shirts come from in the laundry with ballpoint pen corrections. I read the manuscript that weekend. I bought the rights to it Monday morning." Hijuelos' book, The Mambo Kings Play Songs of Love went on to win the 1990 Pulitzer Prize in fiction.

From the beginning Glimcher had actors Antonio Banderas and Armand Assante in mind to play the Castillo brothers. Assante had been working steadily in Hollywood for years but had not yet broken out as a major star. Banderas was a Spanish movie star, best known for his work in the films of Pedro Almodóvar, but largely unknown to American audiences at that time. Warner Bros., however, wanted Jeremy Irons to play Cesar and Ray Liotta to play Nestor. Irons and Liotta were hot off their major successes in the 1990 films Reversal of Fortune and Goodfellas respectively and the studio felt that they would appeal to a wider audience.

Glimcher fought hard for Banderas, who was looking to make an international breakthrough in his first English speaking role. "I was interested in him for this role from the beginning," said Glimcher. "I had seen all of his Spanish movies and thought he was an extraordinary talent." Glimcher arranged to meet with Banderas for the first time in London to discuss the possibility of his co-starring in The Mambo Kings. Despite Banderas' total lack of English skills at the time, Glimcher thought he would be perfect for the film. "(Antonio) was very responsive, incredibly charming," said Glimcher. "I think he can seduce any woman, man, cat, dog or bird in the world." Through a translator, Glimcher told Banderas to work on improving his English for a month and then come to Hollywood for a screen test.

Banderas wound up making a screen test opposite Jeremy Irons, which the executives at Warner Bros. loved. However, Glimcher thought Irons was the wrong choice to play Cesar. "Jeremy did a fantastic job and had an extraordinary accent (but) was not the character I was looking for," said Glimcher. He still believed that Armand Assante should play Cesar, and eventually the studio relented.

For the three main female roles in The Mambo Kings Glimcher cast Cathy Moriarty as Cesar's brassy love interest Lanna, Talisa Soto as Nestor's lost love Maria and Maruschka Detmers as Delores, the woman who tries to make Nestor forget Maria. "Cathy Moriarty I had been in love with since Raging Bull [1980]," said Glimcher. "I kept thinking to myself, 'Lanna is Cathy Moriarty...' Our agents found her and she came in and there was just no question that she was the character. She's a woman of the fifties. Not emaciated. Luscious. Sexy. Welcoming and smart."

Talisa Soto was a model who was just beginning her acting career when she was cast in the small but important role of Maria in The Mambo Kings. "I cast her because of her extraordinary beauty," said Glimcher, "because I wanted her to be emblematic through the film as the face...that this young man Nestor Castillo couldn't get out of his mind."

Actress Annabella Sciorra was originally set to play Nestor's new love interest Delores. However, at the last minute she had to pull out due to a scheduling conflict. Maruschka Detmers, an actress who had made her mark in French films, stepped in to take over the role just two weeks prior to filming.

In an effort to bring some authenticity to the mambo world of the 1950s depicted in The Mambo Kings, Arne Glimcher hired legendary real-life musicians Tito Puente and Celia Cruz to appear in small roles. Puente appears as himself in a rousing musical sequence, and Cruz plays the dramatic role of Evalina, a nightclub owner. "I convinced (Cruz) that we would take it really easy and I'd go with her word for word if necessary," said Glimcher, "and I think that she became the soul of the movie, the fairy godmother of the movie."

In one of the film's most inspired casting choices, former heartthrob Desi Arnaz, Jr. portrays his father Desi Arnaz, Sr. in a startlingly realistic sequence that has the Castillo brothers appearing on an episode of the television show I Love Lucy. Glimcher knew from the beginning that Desi Arnaz, Jr. would be the perfect person to play his famous father. Arnaz, Jr. had been retired from the Hollywood scene for several years and was living in Nevada when Glimcher approached him about appearing in The Mambo Kings. "(Glimcher) said he'd seen a lot of people who could impersonate Ricky (Ricardo)," said Arnaz, Jr. in an interview with Entertainment Weekly, "but nobody who knew who Desi was." Arnaz, Jr. dyed his hair black for the role and wore an ID bracelet, ring and pin that had belonged to his father in order to feel closer to the part. "I wasn't trying to look exactly like him," he said. "It was more about getting his essence and mannerisms."

The cooperation of Arnaz and his sister Lucie were essential in re-creating the I Love Lucy show. "They were really very happy that their father was being treated in a very respectful way," said Glimcher. The set of the Ricardos' living room was re-created down to the last detail for The Mambo Kings while clever editing seamlessly intercut footage with Antonio Banderas, Armand Assante and Desi Arnaz, Jr. with actual footage from an old I Love Lucy episode.

Armand Assante and Antonio Banderas got along beautifully playing musical brothers. Both actors also did their own singing in the film. Assante, who already had some musical training, worked hard to master the drums so that he could hold his own in the scene in which his character plays a number with Tito Puente. Banderas also studied hard to mimic the correct posture and finger placement for his character's trumpet, but the actual playing was done by the great Cuban trumpet player Arturo Sandoval.

Reviews of The Mambo Kings were generally positive. Variety called it "an ambitious, old-fashioned Hollywood film that lovingly recreates the Latino ambience of its Pulitzer Prize-winning source material. With impeccable period sets and costumes and striking cinematography, (The Mambo Kings) beautifully evokes 1950s New York. Arne Glimcher...makes a strong directing debut." Time magazine said, "The film pays tribute to the unshakable ambitions of the next-to-last group of immigrants who embraced the capaciousness of the American promise. See The Mambo Kings -- attend to its music and its sensuous moves – and try, just try, to keep from dancing out of the theater." Rolling Stone said, "The extravagantly sexy and witty Mambo Kings is a stunner; suffused with romantic longing, the film goes beyond spectacle to honor the achievements and dammed-up dreams of a culture long misunderstood by Hollywood...Assante and Banderas are sensational as the loving, warring brothers."

The phenomenal music in The Mambo Kings made its soundtrack a best seller, eventually going platinum. The haunting song "Beautiful Maria of My Soul" was nominated for an Academy Award.

Producers: Arne Glimcher, Arnon Milchan
Director: Arne Glimcher
Screenplay: Cynthia Cidre; Oscar Hijuelos (novel)
Cinematography: Michael Ballhaus
Art Direction: Steve Saklad
Music: Carlos Franzetti, Robert Kraft
Film Editing: Claire Simpson; Glenn Lazzaro (uncredited)
Cast: Armand Assante (Cesar Castillo), Antonio Banderas (Nestor Castillo), Cathy Moriarty (Lanna Lake), Maruschka Detmers (Delores Fuentes), Pablo Calogero (Ramon, The Mambo Kings Band), Scott Cohen (Bernardito, The Mambo Kings Band), Desi Arnaz, Jr. (Desi Arnaz, Sr.), Mario Grillo (Mario - The Mambo Kings Band), Ralph Irizarry (Pito, The Mambo Kings Band), Pete Macnamara (Johnny Bing, The Mambo Kings Band), Jimmy Medina (Manny, The Mambo Kings Band), Marcos Quintanilla (Willie, The Mambo Kings Band), Tito Puente (Himself).
C-101m. Letterboxed.

by Andrea Passafiume
The Mambo Kings

The Mambo Kings

Based on Oscar Hijuelos' 1989 Pulitzer Prize-winning novel The Mambo Kings Play Songs of Love, Arne Glimcher's 1992 film The Mambo Kings tells the passionate story of Nestor and Cesar Castillo (Antonio Banderas and Armand Assante), two brothers who flee Cuba in the early 1950s and attempt to make it big as musicians in New York. Cesar embraces their new life in America with gusto and works to put their new band, The Mambo Kings, on the map. Nestor, however, is haunted by the memory of Maria (Talisa Soto), the love he left behind in Cuba, and longs to return home. The Mambo Kings is an exuberant film bursting with color, energy and irresistible music that chronicles the ups and downs of two brothers and their quest for the American Dream. The Mambo Kings was the first feature film ever directed by Arne Glimcher, a powerful figure in the New York art world and founder of the prestigious Pace Gallery. Throughout his successful career as an art dealer, Glimcher had dabbled in the movie business before as a producer on such films as Gorillas in the Mist (1988) and The Good Mother (1988). Glimcher was attracted to the subject matter of mambo music, of which he had been a big fan since his youth. When he heard that Oscar Hijuelos was writing a book about mambo, he wanted to read it right away, before it was even published. "I called Oscar," said Glimcher, "and I said, 'I understand you're writing this book on mambo. I'd love to read it.' He delivered it to me on Friday in a cardboard box that shirts come from in the laundry with ballpoint pen corrections. I read the manuscript that weekend. I bought the rights to it Monday morning." Hijuelos' book, The Mambo Kings Play Songs of Love went on to win the 1990 Pulitzer Prize in fiction. From the beginning Glimcher had actors Antonio Banderas and Armand Assante in mind to play the Castillo brothers. Assante had been working steadily in Hollywood for years but had not yet broken out as a major star. Banderas was a Spanish movie star, best known for his work in the films of Pedro Almodóvar, but largely unknown to American audiences at that time. Warner Bros., however, wanted Jeremy Irons to play Cesar and Ray Liotta to play Nestor. Irons and Liotta were hot off their major successes in the 1990 films Reversal of Fortune and Goodfellas respectively and the studio felt that they would appeal to a wider audience. Glimcher fought hard for Banderas, who was looking to make an international breakthrough in his first English speaking role. "I was interested in him for this role from the beginning," said Glimcher. "I had seen all of his Spanish movies and thought he was an extraordinary talent." Glimcher arranged to meet with Banderas for the first time in London to discuss the possibility of his co-starring in The Mambo Kings. Despite Banderas' total lack of English skills at the time, Glimcher thought he would be perfect for the film. "(Antonio) was very responsive, incredibly charming," said Glimcher. "I think he can seduce any woman, man, cat, dog or bird in the world." Through a translator, Glimcher told Banderas to work on improving his English for a month and then come to Hollywood for a screen test. Banderas wound up making a screen test opposite Jeremy Irons, which the executives at Warner Bros. loved. However, Glimcher thought Irons was the wrong choice to play Cesar. "Jeremy did a fantastic job and had an extraordinary accent (but) was not the character I was looking for," said Glimcher. He still believed that Armand Assante should play Cesar, and eventually the studio relented. For the three main female roles in The Mambo Kings Glimcher cast Cathy Moriarty as Cesar's brassy love interest Lanna, Talisa Soto as Nestor's lost love Maria and Maruschka Detmers as Delores, the woman who tries to make Nestor forget Maria. "Cathy Moriarty I had been in love with since Raging Bull [1980]," said Glimcher. "I kept thinking to myself, 'Lanna is Cathy Moriarty...' Our agents found her and she came in and there was just no question that she was the character. She's a woman of the fifties. Not emaciated. Luscious. Sexy. Welcoming and smart." Talisa Soto was a model who was just beginning her acting career when she was cast in the small but important role of Maria in The Mambo Kings. "I cast her because of her extraordinary beauty," said Glimcher, "because I wanted her to be emblematic through the film as the face...that this young man Nestor Castillo couldn't get out of his mind." Actress Annabella Sciorra was originally set to play Nestor's new love interest Delores. However, at the last minute she had to pull out due to a scheduling conflict. Maruschka Detmers, an actress who had made her mark in French films, stepped in to take over the role just two weeks prior to filming. In an effort to bring some authenticity to the mambo world of the 1950s depicted in The Mambo Kings, Arne Glimcher hired legendary real-life musicians Tito Puente and Celia Cruz to appear in small roles. Puente appears as himself in a rousing musical sequence, and Cruz plays the dramatic role of Evalina, a nightclub owner. "I convinced (Cruz) that we would take it really easy and I'd go with her word for word if necessary," said Glimcher, "and I think that she became the soul of the movie, the fairy godmother of the movie." In one of the film's most inspired casting choices, former heartthrob Desi Arnaz, Jr. portrays his father Desi Arnaz, Sr. in a startlingly realistic sequence that has the Castillo brothers appearing on an episode of the television show I Love Lucy. Glimcher knew from the beginning that Desi Arnaz, Jr. would be the perfect person to play his famous father. Arnaz, Jr. had been retired from the Hollywood scene for several years and was living in Nevada when Glimcher approached him about appearing in The Mambo Kings. "(Glimcher) said he'd seen a lot of people who could impersonate Ricky (Ricardo)," said Arnaz, Jr. in an interview with Entertainment Weekly, "but nobody who knew who Desi was." Arnaz, Jr. dyed his hair black for the role and wore an ID bracelet, ring and pin that had belonged to his father in order to feel closer to the part. "I wasn't trying to look exactly like him," he said. "It was more about getting his essence and mannerisms." The cooperation of Arnaz and his sister Lucie were essential in re-creating the I Love Lucy show. "They were really very happy that their father was being treated in a very respectful way," said Glimcher. The set of the Ricardos' living room was re-created down to the last detail for The Mambo Kings while clever editing seamlessly intercut footage with Antonio Banderas, Armand Assante and Desi Arnaz, Jr. with actual footage from an old I Love Lucy episode. Armand Assante and Antonio Banderas got along beautifully playing musical brothers. Both actors also did their own singing in the film. Assante, who already had some musical training, worked hard to master the drums so that he could hold his own in the scene in which his character plays a number with Tito Puente. Banderas also studied hard to mimic the correct posture and finger placement for his character's trumpet, but the actual playing was done by the great Cuban trumpet player Arturo Sandoval. Reviews of The Mambo Kings were generally positive. Variety called it "an ambitious, old-fashioned Hollywood film that lovingly recreates the Latino ambience of its Pulitzer Prize-winning source material. With impeccable period sets and costumes and striking cinematography, (The Mambo Kings) beautifully evokes 1950s New York. Arne Glimcher...makes a strong directing debut." Time magazine said, "The film pays tribute to the unshakable ambitions of the next-to-last group of immigrants who embraced the capaciousness of the American promise. See The Mambo Kings -- attend to its music and its sensuous moves – and try, just try, to keep from dancing out of the theater." Rolling Stone said, "The extravagantly sexy and witty Mambo Kings is a stunner; suffused with romantic longing, the film goes beyond spectacle to honor the achievements and dammed-up dreams of a culture long misunderstood by Hollywood...Assante and Banderas are sensational as the loving, warring brothers." The phenomenal music in The Mambo Kings made its soundtrack a best seller, eventually going platinum. The haunting song "Beautiful Maria of My Soul" was nominated for an Academy Award. Producers: Arne Glimcher, Arnon Milchan Director: Arne Glimcher Screenplay: Cynthia Cidre; Oscar Hijuelos (novel) Cinematography: Michael Ballhaus Art Direction: Steve Saklad Music: Carlos Franzetti, Robert Kraft Film Editing: Claire Simpson; Glenn Lazzaro (uncredited) Cast: Armand Assante (Cesar Castillo), Antonio Banderas (Nestor Castillo), Cathy Moriarty (Lanna Lake), Maruschka Detmers (Delores Fuentes), Pablo Calogero (Ramon, The Mambo Kings Band), Scott Cohen (Bernardito, The Mambo Kings Band), Desi Arnaz, Jr. (Desi Arnaz, Sr.), Mario Grillo (Mario - The Mambo Kings Band), Ralph Irizarry (Pito, The Mambo Kings Band), Pete Macnamara (Johnny Bing, The Mambo Kings Band), Jimmy Medina (Manny, The Mambo Kings Band), Marcos Quintanilla (Willie, The Mambo Kings Band), Tito Puente (Himself). C-101m. Letterboxed. by Andrea Passafiume

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Oscar Hijuelo's novel "The Mambo Kings Play Songs of Love" received the 1990 Pulitzer Prize.

Released in United States February 1992

Released in United States on Video September 2, 1992

Released in United States Winter February 28, 1992

Shown at Floating Film Festival on the M.S. New Amsterdam (Premiere) February 1-8, 1992.

Shown at Miami Film Festival (opening film) February 7-16, 1992.

Marushka Detmers replaced actress Annabella Sciorra.

American feature debut for actor Antonio Banderas.

Film marks the directorial debut of Pace Gallery founder Arnold Glimcher.

Began shooting March 18, 1991.

Completed shooting May 31, 1991.

Release expanded in USA throughout March 1992.

Released in United States February 1992 (Shown at Floating Film Festival on the M.S. New Amsterdam (Premiere) February 1-8, 1992.)

Released in United States February 1992 (Shown at Miami Film Festival (opening film) February 7-16, 1992.)

Released in United States Winter February 28, 1992

Released in United States on Video September 2, 1992