The Gay Deception


1h 19m 1935

Brief Synopsis

Mirabel wins a $5,000 lottery which will enable her to live like a queen in New York. There she meets Sandro, a bellboy who is really a prince, so she does get to be a queen after all.

Film Details

Also Known As
April Folly
Release Date
Sep 13, 1935
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Fox Film Corp.; Jesse L. Lasky Productions
Distribution Company
Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corp.
Country
United States

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 19m
Sound
Mono (Western Electric Noiseless Recording)
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1
Film Length
6,906ft (9 reels)

Synopsis

Mirabel Miller, a stenographer living in a small town, wins five thousand dollars in a Casaba melon sweepstakes. Dissatified with her drab life, and having recently adopted the motto "everything or nothing," Mirabel decides to go to New York and spend the money on clothes and fancy hotels against the advice of her banker, vowing to live for a month without regard to what happens afterward. At the exclusive Walsdorf-Plaza in New York, she is mistaken for a rich society girl. Meanwhile, Prince Allesandro of Allesandria, unknown to anyone else, has gotten a job as a bellboy in order to learn about American hotels. As Sandro assists Mirabel with her unpacking, he incites her animosity when he takes unsightly trimming off one of her new hats. Mr. Squires, the chief bellboy, fires Sandro, and he returns to the Allesandria consulate, where Consul-General Semanek is surprised to see him days before his scheduled and much-publicized visit. Sandro goes back to the Walsdorf-Plaza, where he again insults Mirabel's taste. Although Mirabel, who has spent her days in New York going to movies alone, is about to leave town in disappointment, Sandro convinces her to dine with him at an Italian restaurant, where she reveals to his delight that she is not the wealthy girl others mistakenly think she is. Their romantic dinner is interrupted, however, when Sandro is called outside, and Semanek and his cohorts abduct him. When Sandro finds Mirabel again at the hotel, she refuses to speak to him. Cordelia Channing, a society belle staying at the hotel, calls Mirabel to invite her to a charity ball she is giving that evening. Mirabel is impressed with the title of Cordelia's boyfriend, Lord Clewe, and becomes excited in the belief that she will attend the party with the couple; however, later she sadly realizes that she has not been invited to sit with them and must provide her own escort. Sandro arrives and promises Mirabel that she will attend the party with a prince, but when she arrives at the ball to discover that the prince is none other than the bellboy, she becomes angry again. The guests, however, acknowledge Prince Allesandro and offer him and Mirabel seats at the main table. Although Mirabel does not believe that Sandro is a prince, she goes along with what she believes to be a ruse. As the couple dance, certain guests recognize various articles of clothing on Sandro that he stole from them to attire himself for the occasion. Sandro and Mirabel are then chased out of the ballroom, and the police arrive to arrest him as an impostor. Believing that Sandro performed the impersonation for her benefit, Mirabel goes to the jail to try to get him out, and although she does not succeed, Sandro overhears her say that she loves him. Semanek agrees to get Sandro out of jail if he will go with him immediately to the docks to attend his welcoming ceremony to the country. Mirabel comes to the harbor to try to have the prince intercede for Sandro, but when she finally realizes that he truly is the prince, she flees back to the hotel. Sandro makes a grand entrance there, to the surprise of his former employers who earlier fired him, and finds Mirabel in the elevator. They then kiss as Sandro removes more trimming from her silly hat.

Cast

Francis Lederer

Sandro [Prince Allesandro]

Frances Dee

Mirabel [Miller]

Benita Hume

Miss [Cordelia] Channing

Alan Mowbray

Lord Clewe

Lennox Pawle

Consul-General [Semanek]

Adele St. Maur

Lucille

Akim Tamiroff

Spellek

Luis Alberni

Ernest

Lionel Stander

Gettel

Ferdinand Gottschalk

Mr. Squires

Richard Carle

Mr. Spitzer

Lenita Lane

Peg De Forrest

Barbara Fritchie

Joan Dennison

Paul Hurst

Bell captain

Robert Greig

Adolph

Gunner Paulson

Secretary to consul

Rudolf Myzet

Secretary to consul

Maidel Turner

Mrs. Dingledorf

John T. Murray

Jules

Frank Melton

Bellhop

Fred Wallace

Bellhop

William Stelling

Bellhop

Fred Sylva

Bellhop

Vic Chatten

Bellhop

Walter Lawrence

Bellhop

David O'brien

Bellhop

Charles Sellon

Mr. McCaffrey

Jane Barnes

Hazel

Ruth Warren

Linen maid

Rita Owin

Linen maid

Mary Akin

Linen maid

Doro Merande

Linen maid

Anne O'neal

Linen maid

Robert Graves

Chef

Francis Sayles

Chef

Gus Reed

Chef

Jack Mulhall

Bank teller

Spencer Charters

Mr. Mercer, the banker

Paul Mcvey

Sweepstake announcer

Lew Kelly

Hotel carpenter

Torben Meyer

Waiter

Hector V. Sarno

Waiter

Neal Burns

Taxi driver

Olaf Hytten

Butler

Thomas Pogue

Mr. Dingledorf

Phil Tead

Auctioneer

Billy Wayne

Reporter

Jack Hatfield

Reporter

Agostino Borgato

Pastroni

George Humbert

Head waiter

Alan Bridge

Jail attendant

Wade Boteler

Desk sergeant

Russ Clark

Cop

Rodney Hildebrand

Cop

Jack Mower

Cop

Brady Kline

Cop

Esther Muir

Spellek's wife

Iris Adrian

Gettel's wife

Paul Irving

Mayor

Maidena Armstrong

Fat woman

Eddie Fetherston

Wisecracker

Nell Craig

Sam Ash

Film Details

Also Known As
April Folly
Release Date
Sep 13, 1935
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Fox Film Corp.; Jesse L. Lasky Productions
Distribution Company
Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corp.
Country
United States

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 19m
Sound
Mono (Western Electric Noiseless Recording)
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1
Film Length
6,906ft (9 reels)

Award Nominations

Best Writing, Screenplay

1936

Quotes

Trivia

A song entitled "Paris in the Evening" with music by Ted Snyder and lyrics by Preston Sturges was to be sung by Francis Lederer, but was dropped.

William Wyler had to alter some of his shots when it became apparent that Frances Dee was pregnant (with Jody McCrea).

Notes

The working title of this film was April Folly. The file for the film in the Twentieth Century-Fox Produced Scripts Collection at the UCLA Theater Arts Library contains an unpublished play entitled The Proud Princess, by Edward Sheldon and Dorothy Donnelly, and treatments based on this play, which were written in June 1934. It is not known if any of this material was used in the final film. According to a Hollywood Reporter news item, Francis Lederer was to sing a song entitled "Paris in the Evening," music by Ted Snyder and lyrics by Preston Sturges, but the song was not included in the print viewed. This was Jesse L. Lasky's last film produced for Fox, although it was released prior to Here's to Romance (see below). The film was nominated for an Academy Award in the Writing (Original Story) category.