Samson Raphaelson


Playwright, Screenwriter

About

Birth Place
New York City, New York, USA
Born
March 30, 1896
Died
July 16, 1983

Biography

Raphaelson had many of his plays adapted for the screen ("The Jazz Singer" made the transition three times) as well as writing sparkling original screenplays, notably for the sophisticated comedies of Ernst Lubitsch ("Trouble in Paradise" 1932, "Heaven Can Wait" 1943, etc.). Uncle of writer-director-producer Bob Rafelson....

Biography

Raphaelson had many of his plays adapted for the screen ("The Jazz Singer" made the transition three times) as well as writing sparkling original screenplays, notably for the sophisticated comedies of Ernst Lubitsch ("Trouble in Paradise" 1932, "Heaven Can Wait" 1943, etc.). Uncle of writer-director-producer Bob Rafelson.

Life Events

Videos

Movie Clip

Green Dolphin Street (1947) - The Tide May Not Wait None of the principals appear here (except Donna Reed and Lana Turner, as the sisters Patourel, in a portrait) but MGM’s intentions are declared, Dame May Whitty oversees the convent on the fictional Channel Island of St. Pierre, a boffo SF/X backdrop and a visit to Gladys Cooper as the mom, in the 1947 disaster melodrama Green Dolphin Street.
Green Dolphin Street (1947) - I Think I'll Be A Smuggler! The dazzling Patourel sisters (Lana Turner as Marianne, Donna Reed as Marguerite), on the fictional Channel Island of St. Pierre in the 1840’s, are observed by Van Heflin (as Timothy Haslam, with Ramsey Ames), then picnic with their handsome unorthodox new neighbor William (Richard Hart), early in MGM’s disaster-melodrama Green Dolphin Street, 1947.
Green Dolphin Street (1947) - I'm Bold And Scheming Introduction of the sisters Patourel, on a fictional Channel Island ca. 1840, Donna Reed as Marguerite with their mom (Gladys Cooper), and Lana Turner as self-assured (and brunette!) Marianne with papa (Edmund Gwenn), noticing the arrival of a hunky new neighbor (Richard Hart), not knowing yet that his father was her mother’s major first love, early in MGM’s Green Dolphin Street, 1947.
Green Dolphin Street (1947) - It Must Be St. Peter Donna Reed as 1840-something Channel Islander Marguerite is distraught over the (Spoiler!) consecutive deaths of her parents, wakened by the waves at the foot of the cliff-side convent, chooses to approach (though it’s not strictly necessary) through the old smuggler’s cave, thus a dramatic sequence for the MGM special effects team, in Green Dolphin Street, 1947.
Green Dolphin Street (1947) - Big Sea A big earthquake from MGM special effects wizards A. Arnold Gillespie and Warren Newcombe has already begun in what by now must be 1850-something New Zealand, Van Heflin is rescuing Lana Turner while Richard Hart, her husband on a nearby riverboat, is slow to recognize what the natives sense, in Green Dolphin Street, 1947.
Angel (1937) - Traveling Is Becoming Quite Complicated Opening from producer-director Ernst Lubitsch, title character Marlene Dietrich on a plane to Paris, Gino Corrado the polite but insistent hotel clerk, then cutting to importuned Brit Melvyn Douglas, then plenty of the famous touch, indirectly introducing Laura Hope Crews, conducting discreet business indoors, in Angel, 1937.
Angel (1937) - The Courage To Be Unpopular We’ve only just met Herbert Marshall (through a headline montage) as big British diplomat Barker, on his arrival home, we see he’s married to Marlene Dietrich, whose name hasn’t been revealed throughout the first two reels, then servants Edward Everett Horton and Ernest Cossart resume an earlier conversation, in Ernst Lubitsch’s Angel, 1937.
Angel (1937) - Beginning To Spread Both in Paris on business subtly not explained in Samson Raphaelson’s script, Marlene Dietrich as pseudonymous continental “Mrs. Brown” at the high-class bordello-ish home of the “Grand Duchess,” for whom she is mistaken by English Halton (Melvyn Douglas), their first encounter, in Ernst Lubitsch’s Angel, 1937.
Skylark (1941) - Show Me The Moon Sulking hostess Lydia (Claudette Colbert) who, following an insult, has just sent a plate of adulterated food to Myrtle (Binnie Barnes), the snooty wife of her ad-man husband's top client, is approached by suave Jim (Brian Aherne), himself that client's lawyer, in Skylark, 1941.
Skylark (1941) - If You Have To Close A Deal From the opening scene we know that Lydia (Claudette Colbert) has put way more effort than ad-executive husband Tony (Ray Milland) into her gift for their 5th anniversary, as she consults with butler Theodore (Ernest Cossart), in producer-director Mark Sandrich's Skylark, 1941.
Trouble In Paradise (1932) - Moon In The Champagne Director Ernst Lubitsch's fascinating opening sequence from the 1932 romantic comedy Trouble in Paradise, features Herbert Marshall as the thief Gaston Monescu, posing as a Baron.
Trouble In Paradise (1932) - You Are a Crook! The "Countess" (Miriam Hopkins) and the "Baron" (Herbert Marshall) discover each other's games over dinner in Ernst Lubitsch's Trouble in Paradise, 1932.

Trailer

Bibliography