Bloodhounds of Broadway


1h 30m 1952

Film Details

Also Known As
Damon Runyon's Bloodhounds of Broadway
Release Date
Nov 1952
Premiere Information
New York opening: 14 Nov 1952; Los Angeles opening: 26 Nov 1952
Production Company
Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corp.
Distribution Company
Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corp.
Country
United States
Screenplay Information
Based on the short story "The Bloodhounds of Broadway" by Damon Runyon in Collier's (16 May 1931).

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 30m
Sound
Mono
Color
Color (Technicolor)
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1
Film Length
8,338ft (10 reels)

Synopsis

Well-known Broadway bookie Robert "Numbers" Foster receives a tip that he and his men, among them, hypochondriac Harry "Poorly" Sammis, are about to be subpoenaed by the State Crime Investigation Committee. Numbers arranges for his girl friend, singer Yvonne Dugan, to be coached in helpful testimony by dancer Curtaintime Charlie, then heads for Florida with his mugs. Yvonne appears before the committee and testifies that Numbers is a gambler, not a bookie, and the investigation is closed. Numbers then sends the rest of the men back to New York via plane while he and Poorly drive in order "to keep the heat off." During the drive, Numbers sleeps while Poorly gets lost, and they end up at a rural Georgia farm. There, hillbilly Emly Ann Stackerlee is conducting a funeral for her grandpap, and the usually edgy Numbers is soothed by Emly Ann's lovely singing. Emly Ann is delighted by her guests, although her moonshiner fiancé, Crockett Pace, fears that they are "revenuers," and shoots at Emly Ann's shack while she serves them dinner. With Emly Ann and her bloodhounds, Nip and Tuck, in tow, Numbers and Poorly beat a hasty retreat. Worried about Emly Ann's safety, Numbers decides to take her to New York, where she can receive a good education and find a husband "with shoes." Numbers drops the enthralled Emly Ann off at the apartment of Poorly's sister Tessie, then goes to his headquarters, a nightclub run by Dave the Dude. There, Numbers is greeted by Yvonne and his chums, but their reunion is interrupted by the arrival of Inspector McNamara, Numbers' childhood friend, who is now in charge of a new crime committee. McNamara, who believes that at heart, Numbers is a good guy, warns his friend that he will be looking for new witnesses. Worried, Numbers orders his men to be extremely careful with their new set-up. Soon after, Tessie brings a transformed Emly Ann to the club, and Numbers is flabbergasted that the pig-tailed hillbilly he thought was a "kid" is actually a beautiful woman. Jealous, Yvonne points out that McNamara would love to learn that Numbers has transported a twenty-year-old minor across state lines. Determined to install her in a "legit" job, Numbers arranges for Emly Ann to rehearse with Curtaintime Charlie, with the intent of getting her a job performing at the nightclub. Emly Ann works hard at her rehearsals, while Numbers struggles with his growing attraction to her. Deducing that Numbers is in love, Poorly advises him to marry Yvonne, who he assumes is the object of Numbers' affection. When Numbers confesses that he does not love Yvonne, Poorly reminds him that her perjured testimony is the only reason that they were not jailed. Yvonne, who is still jealous of Emly Ann, warns Numbers that she will be very unhappy if Emly Ann gets a job at Dave's nightclub, where she is the headliner, and Numbers informs Emly Ann that there will be no audition. Emly Ann's brave acceptance of his dictate prompts Numbers to concoct another scheme, and he holds the audition as planned, although instead of Dave, he invites numerous Hollywood and Broadway casting directors. Emly Ann is a sensation and receives many offers, although she is upset when Numbers advises her to go to Hollywood, far away from him. Emly Ann reveals that she has fallen in love with Numbers, and was going to ask him to marry her if she had not learned from Tessie that he and Yvonne were "bespoken." Numbers assures Emly Ann that he returns her feelings, and when Yvonne learns of the situation, she goes to McNamara to offer revised testimony about Numbers' business dealings. Although Emly Ann wants Numbers to go straight and testify about the big syndicate for which he works, Numbers refuses, as he would have to pay his substantial back taxes. Numbers and Poorly depart in a hurry, leaving Emly Ann with Nip and Tuck, who have grown fond of Poorly, to lament their absence. McNamara visits Emly Ann and promises that that if Numbers testifies before Yvonne does, he will have to serve only one year in prison. Determined to find her beloved, whom she believes is in serious danger, Emly Ann uses the bloodhounds to track Poorly, and locates him and Numbers on a pier waiting for a boat to Cuba. Numbers mistakenly assumes that Emly Ann has led the police to him, but even though she calms his misapprehensions, he refuses to testify. Emly Ann cries as Numbers and Poorly leave, and her tears are about to convince Numbers to return to the dock when their motorboat is hit by a tug. The bookies survive the accident, however, and testify before the committee, to which Numbers also pays his back taxes. A year later, after their release from prison, Numbers is a cashier at Dave's nightclub, and Poorly and the other mugs work as waiters. Emly Ann is now the star attraction, and she gleefully goes to the kitchen to kiss Numbers after performing.

Film Details

Also Known As
Damon Runyon's Bloodhounds of Broadway
Release Date
Nov 1952
Premiere Information
New York opening: 14 Nov 1952; Los Angeles opening: 26 Nov 1952
Production Company
Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corp.
Distribution Company
Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corp.
Country
United States
Screenplay Information
Based on the short story "The Bloodhounds of Broadway" by Damon Runyon in Collier's (16 May 1931).

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 30m
Sound
Mono
Color
Color (Technicolor)
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1
Film Length
8,338ft (10 reels)

Articles

TCM Remembers Charles Bronson - Sept. 13th - TCM Remembers Charles Bronson this Saturday, Sept. 13th 2003.


Turner Classic Movies will honor the passing of Hollywood action star Charles Bronson on Saturday, Sept. 13, with a four-film tribute.

After years of playing supporting roles in numerous Western, action and war films, including THE MAGNIFICENT SEVEN (1960, 8 p.m.) and THE DIRTY DOZEN (1967, 1:15 a.m.), Bronson finally achieved worldwide stardom as a leading man during the late 1960s and early 1970s. TCM's tribute will also include THE GREAT ESCAPE (1963, 10:15 p.m.), Bronson's second teaming with Steve McQueen and James Coburn, and will conclude with FROM NOON TILL THREE (1976, 4 a.m.), co-starring Jill Ireland.

TCM will alter it's prime-time schedule this Saturday, Sept. 13th. The following changes will take place:

8:00 PM - The Magnificent Seven (1960)
10:15 PM - The Great Escape (1963)
1:15 AM - The Dirty Dozen (1967)
4:00 AM - From Noon Till Three (1976)

Charles Bronson, 1921-2003

Charles Bronson, the tough, stony-faced actor who was one of the most recognizable action heroes in cinema, died on August 30 in Los Angeles from complications from pneumonia. He was 81.

He was born Charles Buchinsky on November 3, 1921 in Ehrenfeld, Pennsylvania, one of fifteen children born to Lithuanian immigrant parents. Although he was the only child to have graduated high school, he worked in the coalmines to support his family until he joined the army to serve as a tail gunner during World War II. He used his money from the G.I. Bill to study art in Philadelphia, but while working as a set designer for a Philadelphia theater troupe, he landed a few small roles in some productions and immediately found acting to be the craft for him.

Bronson took his new career turn seriously, moved to California, and enrolled for acting classes at The Pasadena Playhouse. An instructor there recommended him to director Henry Hathaway for a movie role and the result was his debut in Hathaway's You're in the Navy Now (1951). He secured more bit parts in films like John Sturges' drama The People Against O'Hara (1951), and Joseph Newman's Bloodhounds of Broadway (1952). More substantial roles came in George Cukor's Pat and Mike (1952, where he is beaten up by Katharine Hepburn!); Andre de Toth's classic 3-D thriller House of Wax (1953, as Vincent Price's mute assistant, Igor); and De Toth's fine low-budget noir Crime Wave (1954).

Despite his formidable presence, his leads were confined to a string of B pictures like Gene Fowler's Gang War; and Roger Corman's tight Machine Gun Kelly (both 1958). Following his own television series, Man With a Camera (1958-60), Bronson had his first taste of film stardom when director Sturges casted him as Bernardo, one of the The Magnificent Seven (1960). Bronson displayed a powerful charisma, comfortably holding his own in a high-powered cast that included Yul Brynner and Steve McQueen. A few more solid roles followed in Sturges' The Great Escape (1963), and Robert Aldrich's classic war picture The Dirty Dozen (1967), before Bronson made the decision to follow the European trail of other American actors like Clint Eastwood and Lee Van Cleef. It was there that his hard, taciturn screen personae exploded in full force. In 1968 alone, he had four hit films: Henri Verneuil's Guns for San Sebastian, Buzz Kulik's Villa Rides, Jean Herman's Adieu l'ami which was a smash in France; and the classic Sergio Leone spaghetti Western Once Upon a Time in the West.

These films established Bronson as a huge box-office draw in Europe, and with some more stylish hits like Rene Clement's Rider on the Rain (1969), and Terence Young's Cold Sweat (1971) he soon became one of the most popular film stars in the world. It wasn't easy for Bronson to translate that success back in his homeland. In fact, his first few films on his return stateside: Michael Winners' Chato's Land, and The Mechanic (both 1972), and Richard Fleischer's Mr. Majestyk (1973), were surprisingly routine pictures. It wasn't until he collaborated with Winner again for the controversial Death Wish (1974), an urban revenge thriller about an architect who turns vigilante when his wife and daughter are raped, did he notch his first stateside hit. The next few years would be a fruitful period for Bronson as he rode on a wave of fine films and commercial success: a depression era streetfighter in Walter Hill's terrific, if underrated Hard Times (1975); Frank Gilroy's charming offbeat black comedy From Noon Till Three (1976, the best of many teamings with his second wife, Jill Ireland); Tom Gries tense Breakheart Pass; and Don Siegel's cold-war thriller Telefon (1977).

Sadly, Bronson could not keep up the momentum of good movies, and by the '80s he was starring in a string of forgettable films like Ten to Midnight (1983), The Evil That Men Do (1984), and Murphy's Law (1986, all directed by J. Lee Thompson). A notable exception to all that tripe was John Mackenzie's fine telefilm Act of Vengeance (1986), where he earned critical acclaim in the role of United Mine Workers official Jack Yablonski. Although he more or less fell into semi-retirement in the '90s, his performances in Sean Penn's The Indian Runner (1991); and the title role of Michael Anderson's The Sea Wolf (1993) proved to many that Bronson had the makings of a fine character actor. He was married to actress Jill Ireland from 1968 until her death from breast cancer in 1990. He is survived by his third wife Kim Weeks, six children, and two grandchildren.

by Michael T. Toole
Tcm Remembers Charles Bronson - Sept. 13Th - Tcm Remembers Charles Bronson This Saturday, Sept. 13Th 2003.

TCM Remembers Charles Bronson - Sept. 13th - TCM Remembers Charles Bronson this Saturday, Sept. 13th 2003.

Turner Classic Movies will honor the passing of Hollywood action star Charles Bronson on Saturday, Sept. 13, with a four-film tribute. After years of playing supporting roles in numerous Western, action and war films, including THE MAGNIFICENT SEVEN (1960, 8 p.m.) and THE DIRTY DOZEN (1967, 1:15 a.m.), Bronson finally achieved worldwide stardom as a leading man during the late 1960s and early 1970s. TCM's tribute will also include THE GREAT ESCAPE (1963, 10:15 p.m.), Bronson's second teaming with Steve McQueen and James Coburn, and will conclude with FROM NOON TILL THREE (1976, 4 a.m.), co-starring Jill Ireland. TCM will alter it's prime-time schedule this Saturday, Sept. 13th. The following changes will take place: 8:00 PM - The Magnificent Seven (1960) 10:15 PM - The Great Escape (1963) 1:15 AM - The Dirty Dozen (1967) 4:00 AM - From Noon Till Three (1976) Charles Bronson, 1921-2003 Charles Bronson, the tough, stony-faced actor who was one of the most recognizable action heroes in cinema, died on August 30 in Los Angeles from complications from pneumonia. He was 81. He was born Charles Buchinsky on November 3, 1921 in Ehrenfeld, Pennsylvania, one of fifteen children born to Lithuanian immigrant parents. Although he was the only child to have graduated high school, he worked in the coalmines to support his family until he joined the army to serve as a tail gunner during World War II. He used his money from the G.I. Bill to study art in Philadelphia, but while working as a set designer for a Philadelphia theater troupe, he landed a few small roles in some productions and immediately found acting to be the craft for him. Bronson took his new career turn seriously, moved to California, and enrolled for acting classes at The Pasadena Playhouse. An instructor there recommended him to director Henry Hathaway for a movie role and the result was his debut in Hathaway's You're in the Navy Now (1951). He secured more bit parts in films like John Sturges' drama The People Against O'Hara (1951), and Joseph Newman's Bloodhounds of Broadway (1952). More substantial roles came in George Cukor's Pat and Mike (1952, where he is beaten up by Katharine Hepburn!); Andre de Toth's classic 3-D thriller House of Wax (1953, as Vincent Price's mute assistant, Igor); and De Toth's fine low-budget noir Crime Wave (1954). Despite his formidable presence, his leads were confined to a string of B pictures like Gene Fowler's Gang War; and Roger Corman's tight Machine Gun Kelly (both 1958). Following his own television series, Man With a Camera (1958-60), Bronson had his first taste of film stardom when director Sturges casted him as Bernardo, one of the The Magnificent Seven (1960). Bronson displayed a powerful charisma, comfortably holding his own in a high-powered cast that included Yul Brynner and Steve McQueen. A few more solid roles followed in Sturges' The Great Escape (1963), and Robert Aldrich's classic war picture The Dirty Dozen (1967), before Bronson made the decision to follow the European trail of other American actors like Clint Eastwood and Lee Van Cleef. It was there that his hard, taciturn screen personae exploded in full force. In 1968 alone, he had four hit films: Henri Verneuil's Guns for San Sebastian, Buzz Kulik's Villa Rides, Jean Herman's Adieu l'ami which was a smash in France; and the classic Sergio Leone spaghetti Western Once Upon a Time in the West. These films established Bronson as a huge box-office draw in Europe, and with some more stylish hits like Rene Clement's Rider on the Rain (1969), and Terence Young's Cold Sweat (1971) he soon became one of the most popular film stars in the world. It wasn't easy for Bronson to translate that success back in his homeland. In fact, his first few films on his return stateside: Michael Winners' Chato's Land, and The Mechanic (both 1972), and Richard Fleischer's Mr. Majestyk (1973), were surprisingly routine pictures. It wasn't until he collaborated with Winner again for the controversial Death Wish (1974), an urban revenge thriller about an architect who turns vigilante when his wife and daughter are raped, did he notch his first stateside hit. The next few years would be a fruitful period for Bronson as he rode on a wave of fine films and commercial success: a depression era streetfighter in Walter Hill's terrific, if underrated Hard Times (1975); Frank Gilroy's charming offbeat black comedy From Noon Till Three (1976, the best of many teamings with his second wife, Jill Ireland); Tom Gries tense Breakheart Pass; and Don Siegel's cold-war thriller Telefon (1977). Sadly, Bronson could not keep up the momentum of good movies, and by the '80s he was starring in a string of forgettable films like Ten to Midnight (1983), The Evil That Men Do (1984), and Murphy's Law (1986, all directed by J. Lee Thompson). A notable exception to all that tripe was John Mackenzie's fine telefilm Act of Vengeance (1986), where he earned critical acclaim in the role of United Mine Workers official Jack Yablonski. Although he more or less fell into semi-retirement in the '90s, his performances in Sean Penn's The Indian Runner (1991); and the title role of Michael Anderson's The Sea Wolf (1993) proved to many that Bronson had the makings of a fine character actor. He was married to actress Jill Ireland from 1968 until her death from breast cancer in 1990. He is survived by his third wife Kim Weeks, six children, and two grandchildren. by Michael T. Toole

Quotes

Trivia

Notes

The film's opening title card reads, "Twentieth Century-Fox presents Damon Runyon's Bloodhounds of Broadway." Runyon's story was later included in his short story collection entitled Guys and Dolls (New York, 1931). According to an April 1951 Los Angeles Examiner news item, Victor Mature and Jean Peters were set to co-star with Mitzi Gaynor in the film. In October 1951, Martha Raye and Zero Mostel were announced by Hollywood Reporter as cast members. A February 9, 1952 Los Angeles Times item reported that producer George Jessel had "made a pitch to get" Judy Garland to star opposite Scott Brady. Frank Fontaine had been set for a role but withdrew "following a screenplay re-write," according to an April 1952 Hollywood Reporter item. Also in April 1952, Hollywood Reporter noted that Keenan Wynn was originally cast as "Poorly," but due to a previous commitment at his home studio, M-G-M, was replaced by Wally Vernon. The following actors were included in the cast by Hollywood Reporter news items, although their appearance in the released film has not been confirmed: Teddy Hart, Beverly Baker, Darlene Coureil, Mazine Doviat, Rita Leonard, Betty Jane Petit, Harry Seymour, Ralph Proctor Gamble of the Gamble Brothers vaudeville team, and Walter Vernon, the father of Wally Vernon.
       According to a November 1952 Variety article, Twentieth Century-Fox was sued by Cy Feuer and Ernest H. Martin, the producers of the Broadway musical Guys and Dolls, which was also based on works by Damon Runyon. Feuer and Martin claimed that advertisements for Bloodhounds of Broadway, stating "The Screen's Big Broadway Musical-with all the fabulous Damon Runyon Guys and Dolls," were deliberately misleading and attempted to "captitalize on the great success of the Broadway musical." The disposition of the suit has not been determined. In 1989, "The Bloodhounds of Broadway," along with several other Runyon short stories, was the basis for a Columbia TriStar release of the same name, which was directed by Howard Brookner and starred Matt Dillon, Madonna and Jennifer Grey.