Glenn Ford


Actor
Glenn Ford

About

Also Known As
Gwyllyn Samuel Newton Ford
Birth Place
Quebec, Ontario, Canada
Born
May 01, 1916
Died
August 30, 2006

Biography

Solid Steady... Competent... Glenn Ford embodied these qualities as an actor and as a man. He once stated that he was never acting; he was just playing himself, and the statement did not seem disingenuous. In a career that spanned over 50 years, he worked constantly in movies and TV but never received an Academy Award or Emmy Award nomination. He was one of Hollywood's biggest box-off...

Photos & Videos

Cimarron (1960) - Publicity Art
The Undercover Man - Movie Posters
The Lady in Question - Movie Posters

Family & Companions

Eleanor Powell
Wife
Dancer, actor. Married on October 23, 1943; divorced in 1959; star of such MGM musicals as "Born to Dance" (1936), "Rosalie" (1938) and "Broadway Melody of 1940" (1940).
Hope Lange
Companion
Was dating Ford at the time the two starred in "Pocketful of Miracles" (1961).
Kathryn Hays
Wife
Actor, singer. Married on March 26, 1966; divorced.
Cynthia Hayward
Wife
Actor. Married in 1977; divorced.

Bibliography

"Glenn Ford, RFD"
Glenn Ford (1970)

Notes

Ford and John Wayne are the only two actors to receive the Golden Spur Award, given in recognition of an outstanding Western star.

In addition to his WWII exploits, Ford served two tours of duty in Vietnam with the Third Marine Amphibious Force and is the only actor to have served with both the Green Berets and the French Foreign Legion. Among his numerous medals and commendations are the Medal of Honor, presented by the Veterans of Foreign Wars; the Medaille de la France Libre, for the liberation of France; two commendation medals from the US Navy; and the Vitnamese Legion of Merit.

Biography

Solid Steady... Competent... Glenn Ford embodied these qualities as an actor and as a man. He once stated that he was never acting; he was just playing himself, and the statement did not seem disingenuous. In a career that spanned over 50 years, he worked constantly in movies and TV but never received an Academy Award or Emmy Award nomination. He was one of Hollywood's biggest box-office stars during the 1950s, but still enjoyed working on the plumbing, air conditioning, and electrical wiring at his luxurious mansion in Beverly Hills. No matter the role, he projected a quiet strength, unforced affability, and masculine charm that anchored his fellow actors, whether it was the ravishing Rita Hayworth in "Gilda" (1946) or the roguish Marlon Brando in "The Teahouse of the August Moon" (1956). After mesmerizing audiences in numerous noir flicks and the controversial "Blackboard Jungle" (1955), he went on to lend class and gravitas to the role of Pa Kent in "Superman the Movie" (1978). When he died at the age of 90 - one of the last Golden Age male stars still alive into the next millennium - he left behind a legacy of consistently dignified performances, even if the material was not always top notch. The ever dependable, manly Ford was always right on the money.

Glenn Ford was born Gwyllyn Samuel Newton Ford on May 1, 1916, in Quebec City, Quebec, Canada, to a prominent family. His father was a successful railroad executive and his great uncle was Sir John A. Macdonald, the first Prime Minister of Canada. The family moved to Santa Monica, CA when Ford was seven, where he was educated at local schools. After graduating high school, he expressed a strong desire to become an actor. His parents encouraged him as long as he learned a trade to support himself during the lean times. Ford agreed, studying carpentry, electrical wiring, and air conditioning in his spare time while working with small theater groups. Unpretentious above the craft of acting even then, he would help out by building sets if he did not have a prominent part.

Ford knew that the theater life in Los Angeles was not going to provide him with a steady paycheck so, like thousands of other aspiring actors, he tried to wrangle a screen test from one of the major film studios. He tried out for Twentieth Century Fox and eventually landed his first role in the drama "Heaven with a Barbed Wire Fence" (1939). Ford's debut attracted some good reviews and - even better - a long-term contract from Columbia Pictures. Harry Cohn, the famously crass chief of Columbia, convinced Ford that the movie-going public (as well Cohn himself) would have a tough time pronouncing the name "Gwyllyn," so Ford changed his first name to "Glenn."

At Columbia, Ford met another young, male contract player from a well-to-do Southern California family named William Holden. Cohn hoped to pit the two actors against each other for parts, hoping the competition would keep them easy to control. Rather than resent each other, Ford and Holden became life-long friends whose successful careers roughly paralleled each other, though Holden eventually became the bigger box office draw. Ford began to work steadily in the early 1940s in a succession of B movies - which Columbia was known for churning out. With titles like "Convicted Woman" (1940) and "Babies for Sale" (1940) nobody was going to confuse these flicks with RKO's "Citizen Kane" (1941) or MGM's "Philadelphia Story" (1940), but they were the type of studio product that allowed Ford to learn his craft as he moved along up the ladder.

As he gained more experienced, Cohn took notice and the parts got better. He played one of the leads opposite pal Holden in the western "Texas" (1941) and nabbed another starring role in Columbia's first Technicolor western "The Desperad s" (1943). He starred in the wartime drama "Destroyer" (1943), playing a Navy man fighting the Japanese, but by this time, reality had overtaken fantasy. Ford put his acting career on hold and joined the Marine Corps Reserve, working as a photographic specialist in San Diego. Now working to defeat the Japanese for real, he worked in military public relations in a variety of capacities before receiving an honorable discharge at the end of 1944, returning home to wife, famed tap dancer-actress Eleanor Powell, whom he had married in 1943. The famous couple would go on to have a son, actor Peter Ford, and divorce in 1959. Throughout the years, Ford would go on to marry three other women after Powell, including Kathryn Hays, Cynthia Hayward and Jeanne Baus.

Back in post-war Hollywood, Ford's film career took off. First up was the film by which all other Ford films would be measured - "Gilda." Designed as a vehicle for the studio's flame-haired sexpot Rita Hayworth, the noir classic moved her to a whole new level of stardom, but in her satin and diamond-clad wake, Ford picked up heat as well, playing her crafty and often cruel lover who would just as soon smack her as kiss her. The couple's onscreen chemistry was palpable - leading Cohn to think his two cash cows were getting together off-screen, so the studio head resorted to bugging Hayworth's trailer. In fact, Ford and Hayworth became close friends - possibly lovers, as Ford admitted later on in years - and began an on-screen collaboration that included several solid films, including "The Loves of Carmen" (1948) and "Affair in Trinidad" (1952). Ford's laconic, grounded machismo allowed a goddess like Hayworth to shine without the film losing its moorings in reality.

With "Gilda" making him an instant A-lister, Ford put this new box office power to excellent use, starring opposite the formidable Bette Davis (playing twins!) in one of her most popular "women's" pictures, "A Stolen Life" (1946). But Ford did not limit himself to taming wild women on screen. Through the balance of the late 1940s and into the early 1950s, he continued to grapple with the Wild West in movies like "The Man from Colorado" (1948) and "Lust for Gold" (1949), as well as wild men in prison dramas like "Convicted" (1950) and "The Secret of Convict Lake" (1951).

With his uncanny ability to project calm in the center of the storm, Ford found himself the star of two of the seminal films of the 1950s. "The Big Heat" (1953), a classic film noir directed by the great Fritz Lang, showcased Ford as Detective Dave Bannion, a tough cop who takes on a big city crime syndicate. Vengeful, violent, and ambiguously moral, Ford's character convincingly stands up to a terrifying Lee Marvin playing a mob thug. It was a tribute to Ford's everyman empathy that the audience never turned against him despite his onscreen brutality - toward men and even women. In "Blackboard Jungle" (1955) Ford played another authority figure, but this time in a different setting. In the role of an idealistic inner city teacher who inherits a class of unruly, violent students, Ford did some of his finest work. Refusing to give in to the easy cynicism displayed by his fellow teachers, he takes on Vic Morrow's violent gang leader, no less a sociopath than the one Lee Marvin played in "The Big Heat." He ultimately wins the hearts and minds of his pupils, most notably the class leader played by Sidney Poitier. Poitier, a great admirer of Ford's work, would later pay tribute to him by playing a similar teacher role in "To Sir, With Love" (1967).

"Blackboard Jungle" was a huge hit and received four Academy Award nominations. Alas, none of those nominations went to the underappreciated Ford. It was an egregious slight - with cinephiles finding it hard to imagine the movie working near as well as it did without the decency and strength of Ford's performance at its core. But the actor, in his typical gracious fashion, did not complain and just went on acting in a variety of films, grateful for the work. "The Teahouse of the August Moon" was a nice change of pace, showing Ford's knack for comedy. Playing an American military officer sent to Okinawa to import democracy to the locals after World War II, Ford g s head-to-head with Marlon Brando's broad portrayal of a Japanese interpreter. "Teahouse" was Brando's movie, to be sure, but Ford gave a more realistic and equally comedic performance.

The late 1950s saw Ford return to his Western roots. "The Fastest Gun Alive" (1956) displayed to good advantage Ford's remarkable ability to quick draw a pistol. He was, in fact, considered more skilled than even John Wayne at handling a firearm. He played an outlaw in "3:10 to Yuma," a classic Western that was re-made in 2007 with Russell Crowe reprising Ford's Ben Wade role. He mentored a young Jack Lemmon in the macho ways of the Western hero in the obviously named "Cowboy" (1958) and helped satirize the genre in the quirky "The Sheepman" (1958). Ford's on-screen and off-screen personas also coalesced in the late 1950s. Not only did he play a succession of military roles in films like "Don't Go Near the Water" (1957), "Imitation General" (1958), "Torpedo Run" (1958), and "It Started with a Kiss" (1959), he also joined the military as well. In 1958, Ford signed up with the US Naval Reserve and was commissioned as a lieutenant commander. As a public affairs officer, he promoted the Navy through radio and TV broadcasts, personal appearances, and documentary films. Although born in Canada, he established himself as one of the most patriotic actors in Hollywood.

Unlike friend and fellow actor Ronald Reagan, however, Ford was not about to give up his day job for politics. He continued working into the 1960s, moving between comedies, dramas and family films. "Pocketful of Miracles" (1961) reunited Ford with Bette Davis, his co-star from "A Stolen Life." The movie was sentimental and old-fashioned but found an audience despite the looming social upheavals of the 1960s. "The Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse" (1963) allowed Ford to play a playboy, a role his innate nobility undermined to a degree. "The Courtship of Eddie's Father" (1963) found Ford in a more familiar and comfortable role as a widower whose precocious son (a young Ron Howard) wants him back in the dating pool. The charming comedy gave rise to a popular sitcom that ran on ABC from 1969 through 1972.

Ford had been a product of the old Hollywood studio system, and once the film industry gave in to the tectonic shifts of the 1960s, his career began to wane. "The Money Trap" (1965) was a talent trap, wasting the efforts of old pros like Ford, Joseph Cotton, and an aging Rita Hayworth. Ford tried to resurrect the Western with "Day of the Evil Gun" (1968), but it lacked the post-modern cynicism that would make "The Wild Bunch" (1969) and "Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid" (1969) so compelling. Turning to TV, he starred in the series "Cade's County" (CBS, 1971-72). Yet another Western, but the long-running "Bonanza" (NBC, 1959-1973) had indicated that television audiences were slower to give up their cowboy her s than their movie counterparts. Alas, "Cade's County" only lasted two seasons despite favorable reviews.

As the 1970s brought on a revolution in Hollywood filmmaking with special effect-driven blockbusters by young directors like Steven Spielberg and George Lucas, Ford's career - like the cattle he had herded in so many Westerns - largely went out to pasture. "Midway" (1976) gave him a chance to play a Naval officer again. "Superman: The Movie" (1978) gave him a chance to shine in the role of Jonathan Kent, Superman's adoptive Earth father. It was a small part, but Ford infused it with his usual dignity and grace. More indicative of the types of roles now being offered him was that of Detective Jake Durham in "The Visitor" (1979). The story of a young girl with telekinetic powers becoming a pawn in a battle between God and Satan, Ford could not save the movie. Whether he could save the girl was hard to say, since almost no one saw the film; it mercifully got a very limited release in theaters and on video.

As Ford got older and his health began to decline, his career wound down during the 1980s. He worked primarily in TV movies, lending his talents to a few unremarkable projects, with the best being "My Town" (ABC, 1986). A series of strokes left him partially incapacitated and he retired from acting in the early 1990s. The mediocrity of his later projects, however, did not tarnish his reputation or his dignity. Glenn Ford died on Aug. 30, 2006, from natural causes, but his strong body of work ensured his place among the finest film actors of the twentieth century.

Filmography

 

Cast (Feature Film)

Our Hollywood Education (1992)
Himself
Final Verdict (1991)
Reverend Lowell Rogers
Raw Nerve (1991)
Captain Gavin
Border Shootout (1990)
Sheriff Danahar
Casablanca Express (1990)
William Holden: The Golden Boy (1989)
Day of the Assasins (1981)
Virus (1980)
Happy Birthday to Me (1980)
The Visitor (1979)
Detective
The Gift (1979)
Beggarman, Thief (1979)
Superman:The Movie (1978)
The 3000 Mile Chase (1977)
Midway (1976)
The Greatest Gift (1974)
Disappearance of Flight 412 (1974)
Colonel Pete Moore
Punch and Jody (1974)
Jarrett (1973)
Sam Jarrett
Santee (1973)
Smith! (1969)
Smith
Heaven With a Gun (1969)
Jim Killian
Day of the Evil Gun (1968)
Lorn Warfield
The Last Challenge (1967)
Marshal Dan Blaine
A Time for Killing (1967)
Major Charles Wolcott
Is Paris Burning? (1966)
Gen. Omar Bradley
Rage (1966)
Reuben
The Money Trap (1966)
Joe Baron
The Rounders (1965)
Ben Jones
Dear Heart (1964)
Harry Mork
Advance to the Rear (1964)
Capt. Jared Heath
Fate Is the Hunter (1964)
Sam McBane
The Courtship of Eddie's Father (1963)
Tom Corbett
Love Is a Ball (1963)
John Davis
Experiment in Terror (1962)
John Ripley
The Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse (1962)
Julio Desnoyers
Cry for Happy (1961)
Andy Cyphers
Pocketful of Miracles (1961)
Dave the Dude
Cimarron (1960)
Yancey Cravat
The Gazebo (1960)
Elliot Nash
It Started with a Kiss (1959)
Sgt. Joe Fitzpatrick
Cowboy (1958)
Tom Reece
Imitation General (1958)
M/Sgt. Murphy Savage
The Sheepman (1958)
Jason Sweet
Torpedo Run (1958)
Lt. Cmdr. Barney Doyle
3:10 to Yuma (1957)
Ben Wade
Don't Go Near the Water (1957)
Lt. Max Siegel
Jubal (1956)
Jubal Troop
The Fastest Gun Alive (1956)
George Temple
Ransom! (1956)
David G. Stannard
The Teahouse of the August Moon (1956)
Capt. Fisby
Blackboard Jungle (1955)
Richard Dadier
The Americano (1955)
Sam Dent
Trial (1955)
David [Blake]
Interrupted Melody (1955)
Dr. Thomas King
The Violent Men (1955)
John Parrish
Human Desire (1954)
Jeff Warren
City Story (1954)
Narrated by
Appointment in Honduras (1953)
Jim Corbett
The Big Heat (1953)
Dave Bannion
The Man from the Alamo (1953)
John Stroud
Terror on a Train (1953)
Peter Lyncort
Plunder of the Sun (1953)
Al Colby
The Green Glove (1952)
Michael Blake
Young Man With Ideas (1952)
Maxwell Webster
Affair in Trinidad (1952)
Steve Emery
The Secret of Convict Lake (1951)
James Canfield
The Flying Missile (1951)
Commander William A. Talbot
Follow the Sun (1951)
Ben Hogan
The Redhead and the Cowboy (1951)
Gil Kyle
The White Tower (1950)
Martin Ordway
Convicted (1950)
Joe Hufford
Lust for Gold (1949)
Jacob Walz
The Doctor and the Girl (1949)
Dr. Michael Corday
The Undercover Man (1949)
Frank Warren
Mr. Soft Touch (1949)
Joe Miracle
The Loves of Carmen (1948)
Don Jose Mizarabengoa
The Mating of Millie (1948)
Doug Andrews
The Man from Colorado (1948)
Colonel Owen Devereaux
The Return of October (1948)
Professor Bentley Bassett, Jr.
Framed (1947)
Michael Lambert
Gilda (1946)
Johnny Farrell
A Stolen Life (1946)
Bill Emerson
Gallant Journey (1946)
John Joseph Montgomery
Destroyer (1943)
Mickey Donohue
The Desperadoes (1943)
Cheyenne Rogers [also known as Bill Smith]
Hollywood in Uniform (1943)
Flight Lieutenant (1942)
Danny Doyle, also known as Danny White
The Adventures of Martin Eden (1942)
Martin Eden
Texas (1941)
Tod Ramsey
Go West, Young Lady (1941)
Tex Miller
So Ends Our Night (1941)
Ludwig Kern
Blondie Plays Cupid (1940)
Charlie
Convicted Woman (1940)
Jim Brent
Babies for Sale (1940)
Steve Burton
The Lady in Question (1940)
Pierre Morestan
Men Without Souls (1940)
Johnny Adams
My Son Is Guilty (1939)
Barney
Heaven with a Barbed Wire Fence (1939)
Joe [Riley]

Producer (Feature Film)

Pocketful of Miracles (1961)
Associate Producer

Cast (Special)

Rita Hayworth: Dancing Into the Dream (1991)
The All-Star Salute to Our Troops (1991)
World War II: A Personal Journey (1991)
Host
The 12th Annual Circus of the Stars (1987)
My Town (1986)
Amos
Sinatra: The First 40 Years (1980)
When the West Was Fun: A Western Reunion (1979)
Glenn Ford's Summertime, U.S.A. (1973)
The Rowan and Martin Special (1973)
America (1970)
Host
Howdy (1970)

Cast (Short)

Operation Teahouse (1956)
Himself
Have Faith in Our Children (1955)
Himself
Screen Actors (1950)
Himself

Cast (TV Mini-Series)

Louis L'Amour's The Sacketts (1979)
Evening in Byzantium (1978)

Life Events

1920

Stage debut in "Tom Thumb's Wedding"

1935

Appeared on Broadway in Lillian Hellman's "The Children's Hour"

1937

Short film acting debut in "Night in Manhattan" (Paramount)

1939

Tested and signed by Columbia

1939

Feature film debut in Columbia's "Heaven With a Barbed Wire Fence"

1940

First film with Rita Hayworth, Charles Vidor's "The Lady in Question"

1941

First of eight films with director George Marshall, "Texas"

1942

Served in United States Marine Corps

1946

Soared to popularity in Vidor's "Gilda" (opposite Rita Hayworth) and Curtis Bernhardt's "A Stolen Life" (with Bette Davis playing a dual role and debuting as producer)

1948

Last film with Vidor, "The Loves of Carmen"

1953

First of two films with Fritz Lang, "The Big Heat" (also the follow-up "Human Desire" 1954)

1955

Portrayed NYC public school teacher in Richard Brooks' "The Blackboard Jungle", adapted from Evan Hunter's novel

1956

Demonstrated his facility for comedy in "Teahouse of the August Moon"

1956

Played peace-loving storekeeper in "The Fastest Gun Alive"

1958

Acted the part of a stern cattle boss in "Cowboy"

1961

Starred in Vincent Minnelli's glossy World War II picture "The Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse"

1961

Second movie opposite Bette Davis, Frank Capra's final film, "A Pocketful of Miracles", a remake of Capra's 1933 "Lady for a Day"; also served as associate producer

1963

Reunited with Minnelli for "The Courtship of Eddie's Father" with Ron Howard

1965

Eleventh and last film with character actor Edgar Buchanan, "The Rounders"

1966

Fifth and final film with Hayworth, "The Money Trap"

1966

Appeared in Rene Clement's "Is Paris Burning?"

1974

Donned the cloth as Reverend Tom Holvak opposite Julie Harris as his wife Elizabeth in NBC movie "The Greatest Gift" and subsequent short-lived, 1975 spin-off series, "The Family Holvak"

1976

Portrayed Rear Admiral Raymond Spruane in "Midway"

1978

Acted the part of Christopher Reeve's father on Earth in "Superman"

1979

Appeared in NBC miniseries "The Sacketts"; cast included Tom Selleck, Sam Elliott and Ben Johnson

1980

Acted in "Virus", allegedly the biggest budgeted Japanese film to date

1986

Grandfatherly turn as Amos in "My Town", an ABC "Disney Sunday Movie"

1991

Last feature to date, "Raw Nerve"

1991

Played Adela Rogers St Johns' famous defense lawyer father in TNT movie "The Final Verdict"

1992

Hospitalized in intensive care with a heart problem and several blood clots; condition upgraded to "serious" in July after nearly a month; released in August

Photo Collections

Cimarron (1960) - Publicity Art
Here are some specialty drawings created by MGM for newspaper and magazine reproduction to publicize Cimarron (1960), starring Glenn Ford, Maria Schell, and Anne Baxter.
The Undercover Man - Movie Posters
The Undercover Man - Movie Posters
The Lady in Question - Movie Posters
The Lady in Question - Movie Posters
Mr. Soft Touch - Movie Posters
Mr. Soft Touch - Movie Posters
Mr. Soft Touch - Lobby Cards
Mr. Soft Touch - Lobby Cards
The Undercover Man - Lobby Card Set
The Undercover Man - Lobby Card Set
The Lady in Question - Lobby Cards
The Lady in Question - Lobby Cards
The Undercover Man - Behind-the-Scenes Photos
The Undercover Man - Behind-the-Scenes Photos
The Lady in Question - Behind-the-Scenes Photos
The Lady in Question - Behind-the-Scenes Photos
Mr. Soft Touch - Behind-the-Scenes Photos
Mr. Soft Touch - Behind-the-Scenes Photos
Framed - Behind-the-Scenes Photos
Framed - Behind-the-Scenes Photos
Convicted - Movie Posters
Convicted - Movie Posters
Convicted - Behind-the-Scenes Photos
Convicted - Behind-the-Scenes Photos
Convicted - Publicity Stills
Convicted - Publicity Stills
Convicted - Scene Stills
Convicted - Scene Stills
Convicted - Lobby Cards
Convicted - Lobby Cards
Gallant Journey - Publicity Still
Gallant Journey - Publicity Still
The Courtship of Eddie's Father - Movie Posters
Here are a few original release American movie posters for The Courtship of Eddie's Father (1963), starring Glenn Ford.
3:10 to Yuma - Movie Posters
Here are a few original release movie posters from Columbia Pictures' 3:10 to Yuma (1957), starring Glenn Ford and Van Heflin.
Framed - Lobby Card Set
Here is a set of lobby cards from Columbia Pictures' Framed (1947), starring Glenn Ford.
Framed - Movie Posters
Here are a few original movie posters from Columbia Pictures' Framed (1947), starring Glenn Ford.
The Fastest Gun Alive - Ad Art
Here are several pieces of art created for use in advertisements for The Fastest Gun Alive (1956), starring Glenn Ford.
The Big Heat - Movie Posters
Here are a few original-release American movie posters from Columbia Pictures' The Big Heat (1953), directed by Fritz Lang and starring Glenn Ford and Gloria Grahame.
Gilda - Movie Poster
Here is the American One-Sheet Movie Poster from Gilda (1946), starring Rita Hayworth and Glenn Ford. One-sheets measured 27x41 inches, and were the poster style most commonly used in theaters.
Experiment in Terror - Movie Poster
Here is an original release movie poster from Columbia's Experiment in Terror (1962), directed by Blake Edwards. This is an Insert poster, measuring 14 x 36 inches.
Destroyer - Movie Poster
Here is the American One-Sheet Movie Poster for Warner Bros' Destroyer (1943), starring Edward G. Robinson. One-sheets measured 27x41 inches, and were the poster style most commonly used in theaters.
The Sheepman - Publicity Stills
Here are a few publicity stills from MGM's The Sheepman (1958), starring Glenn Ford and Shirley MacLaine. Publicity stills were specially-posed photos, usually taken off the set, for purposes of publicity or reference for promotional artwork.
Blackboard Jungle - Glenn Ford and Anne Francis Publicity Stills
Here are some Publicity Stills from MGM's Blackboard Jungle (1955), starring Glenn Ford and Anne Francis. Publicity stills were specially-posed photos, usually taken off the set, for purposes of publicity or reference for promotional artwork.
The Gazebo - Publicity Stills
Here are a few photos taken to help publicize The Gazebo (1959), starring Glenn Ford and Debbie Rynolds. Publicity stills were specially-posed photos, usually taken off the set, for purposes of publicity or reference for promotional artwork.
Blackboard Jungle - Behind-the-Scenes Photos
Here are several photos taken behind-the-scenes during production of MGM's Blackboard Jungle (1955), directed by Richard Brooks and starring Glenn Ford, Anne Francis, and Sidney Poitier.
Ransom! - Publicity Stills
Here are a few photos taken to help publicize MGM's Ransom! (1956), starring Glenn Ford and Donna Reed. Publicity stills were specially-posed photos, usually taken off the set, for purposes of publicity or reference for promotional artwork.
Superman: The Movie - Program
Here is the official Movie Program from Warner Bros' Superman: The Movie (1978), starring Christopher Reeve, Marlon Brando, Margot Kidder, and Gene Hackman.
Heaven With a Gun - Glenn Ford Publicity Still
Here is a photo of Glenn Ford, taken to help publicize MGM's Heaven With a Gun (1969). Publicity stills were specially-posed photos, usually taken off the set, for purposes of publicity or reference for promotional artwork.
Don't Go Near the Water - Advertising Art
Here are a few pieces of advertising art prepared by MGM to publicize Don't Go Near the Water (1957), starring Glenn Ford, Anne Francis, Eva Gabor, and Gia Scala.
A Stolen Life - Movie Poster
Here is the American one-sheet movie poster for A Stolen Life (1946). One-sheets measured 27x41 inches, and were the poster style most commonly used in theaters.
Flight Lieutenant - Movie Poster
Here is a half-sheet movie poster for Flight Lieutenant (1942), starring Pat O'Brien. Half sheets measured 22 x 28 inches.
The Badlanders - Behind-the-Scenes Photos
Here are a few photos taken behind-the-scenes during production of The Badlanders (1958), starring Alan Ladd and Ernest Borgnine.
The Rounders - Publicity Stills
Here are a few Publicity Stills from The Rounders (1965). Publicity stills were specially-posed photos, usually taken off the set, for purposes of publicity or reference for promotional artwork.
The Teahouse of the August Moon - Publicity Stills
Here are a few Publicity Stills from The Teahouse of the August Moon (1956). Publicity stills were specially-posed photos, usually taken off the set, for purposes of publicity or reference for promotional artwork.

Videos

Movie Clip

The Undercover Man (1949) — (Movie Clip) I Have No Opinion Partial SPOILER as it follows the death of gang-bookkeeper Rocco, unveiled under-cover Treasury agent Frank (Glenn Ford, title character) with obsequious mob attorney O’Rourke (Barry Kelley) making an offer, then agonizing on the train, montage with Joseph H. Lewis directing Robert Osterloh, James Whitmore, Frank Tweddell, Esther Minciotti, in The Undercover Man, 1949.
Don't Go Near The Water (1957) - It Is Not Customary Nearly 90 minutes in, P-R Lt. Siegel has drawn the short straw, required to escort a lady correspondent, presumed to be elderly or worse, when Eva Gabor appears as Miss Aldridge, disorienting all including Russ Tamblyn as Tyson, Jeff Richards as Lt. Pendleton, and Howard Smith as the admiral, in MGM’s Don’t Go Near The Water,1957.
Don't Go Near The Water (1957) - Never Second Class Having contrived a fake air raid to separate her from a higher-ranking suitor, yeoman sailor Garrett (Earl Holliman) confesses his admiration for Lt. Tomlen (Anne Francis, in her last feature before her long run as an in-demand TV guest star), on an MGM WWII South Pacific island, in Don’t Go Near The Water,1957, starring Glenn Ford.
Don't Go Near The Water (1957) - They're Completely Unpredictable Jaded Lt. Siegel (Glenn Ford) with swabbie yeoman Garrett (Earl Holliman) stuck with showing goofball congressmen (Jansen and Smithfield, Jack Albertson and Charles Watts) around their rear-sector Pacific island base, meets (23 year-old Sicilian-Irish) Gia Scala as native schoolteacher Melora (Alba), Chuck Walters directing for MGM, in Don’t Go Near The Water, 1957, from the novel by Life magazine editor William Brinkley.
Don't Go Near The Water (1957) - Playin' With His Sexton Opening the straightforward MGM/Glenn Ford service comedy (his first following the hit The Teahouse Of The August Moon, 1956), narration by Keenan Wynn (who appears later as a nutty newsman) introducing Fred Clark as the CO, with Ford, Russ Tamblyn and Ike Gibson as Pratt, in Don’t Go Near The Water,1957, featuring Gia Scala, Anne Francis and Eva Gabor.
Torpedo Run (1958) - Good Old Fujiyama Sighting land in their chase after a Japanese battleship, Sloan (Ernest Borgnine) and Commander Doyle (Glenn Ford) elect to surface, with Lt. Foley (Dean Jones) running late, in Torpedo Run, 1958.
Torpedo Run (1958) - Rough On The Skipper Opening scene, clearly tormented submarine Commander Doyle (Glenn Ford) takes out a Japanese ship with one shot, supported by executive officer Sloan (Ernest Borgnine), in Torpedo Run, 1958, from a story by Richard Sale.
Torpedo Run (1958) - I'm A Bad Risk Ending a sequence in which Cmdr. Doyle (Glenn Ford) had to torpedo the transport ship carrying his wife and daughter, because it was used to “screen” a Japanese ship he was obligated to attack, a flashback to his courtship with Jane (Diane Brewster), with his best-buddy Lt. Archie Sloan (Ernest Borgnine), in Torpedo Run, 1958.
Experiment In Terror (1962) - Meet Me At The Roaring Twenties Teller Kelly (Lee Remick) takes a call from master criminal Red (Ross Martin), her threatened sister Tobi (Stefanie Powers) frolics at the pool and FBI-man Ripley (Glenn Ford) frets, in Blake Edwards' Experiment In Terror, 1962.
Lady In Question, The (1940) - I'm One Of The Family Acquitted murder suspect Natalie (Rita Hayworth) has belatedly accepted an offer of help from Parisian bike shop owner Morestan (Brian Aherne), who was on her jury, leading to her first day at work, where his wife (Irene Rich) and bedazzled son (Glenn Ford) don’t know the back-story, in The Lady In Question, 1940.
Jubal (1956) - Most Horses Is Better Than Humans First scene after the opening, in which rancher Shep (Ernest Borgnine) found Glenn Ford (title character) staggering out of the Wyoming woods, introducing Pinky (Rod Steiger), Sam (Noah Beery Jr.) and Carson (John Dierkes), in Jubal, 1956, directed by Delmer Daves, often cited as a Western treatment of Shakespeare’s Othello.
Jubal (1956) - They'll Steal You Blind Director Delmer Daves introduces key characters, as new ranch foreman Glenn Ford (title character) has to intervene when Pinky (Rod Steiger) and friends tangle with a caravan of Christian pilgrims (Basil Ruysdael as Shem Hoktor, Felicia Farr his daughter, Charles Bronson riding shotgun), in Jubal, 1956.

Trailer

Cimarron (1960) - (Original Trailer) A pioneer couple plays a major role in the settling of Oklahoma in Cimarron (1960), directed by Anthony Mann and starring Glenn Ford & Maria Schell.
Pocketful Of Miracles (1961) -- (Original Trailer) Bette Davis plays Apple Annie in Frank Capra's last movie, Pocketful Of Miracles (1961).
Gilda - (Re-issue Trailer) A gambler (Glenn Ford) discovers an old flame (Rita Hayworth) in South America, but she's married to his new boss, in Gilda, 1946.
Doctor and the Girl, The - (Original Trailer) A doctor (Glenn Ford) leaves his wealthy family to work in the slums in The Doctor and the Girl (1949) with Janet Leigh as the girl.
Destroyer - (Re-issueTrailer) The crew of a torpedoed ship fights to take out an enemy sub in Destroyer (1943) starring Edward G. Robinson and Glenn Ford.
Dear Heart - (Original Trailer) Glenn Ford must decide between his fiancee and a woman he meets at a convention in Dear Heart (1964).
Blackboard Jungle - (Vic Morrow introduction trailer) Vic Morrow, who plays juvenile delinquent Artie West, introduces the trailer for Blackboard Jungle (1955).
Affair in Trinidad - (Original Trailer) Rita Hayworth re-teamed with her Gilda co-star Glenn Ford for the sultry crime thriller Affair in Trinidad (1952).
Advance To The Rear - (Original Trailer) Civil War rejects are sent to the West, supposedly out of harm's way in Advance To The Rear (1964) starring Glenn Ford and Stella Stevens.
Don't Go Near The Water - (Original Trailer) Navy office workers scheme to build a recreation hall on a remote Pacific island in the military comedy Don't Go Near The Water (1957) starring Glenn Ford.
3:10 To Yuma (1957) - (Original Trailer) A rancher (Van Heflin) must run the gauntlet to get a prisoner (Glenn Ford) to the 3:10 To Yuma, directed by Delmer Daves.
Heaven With A Gun - (Original Trailer) Glenn Ford stars in Heaven With A Gun (1969) as a gunslinger-turned-preacher who is forced to return to his old ways.

Promo

Family

Newton Ford
Father
Railroad executive.
Hannah Ford
Mother
Peter Newton Ford
Son
Actor. Mother, Eleanor Powell.

Companions

Eleanor Powell
Wife
Dancer, actor. Married on October 23, 1943; divorced in 1959; star of such MGM musicals as "Born to Dance" (1936), "Rosalie" (1938) and "Broadway Melody of 1940" (1940).
Hope Lange
Companion
Was dating Ford at the time the two starred in "Pocketful of Miracles" (1961).
Kathryn Hays
Wife
Actor, singer. Married on March 26, 1966; divorced.
Cynthia Hayward
Wife
Actor. Married in 1977; divorced.
Jeanne Baus
Wife
Married in 1993.

Bibliography

"Glenn Ford, RFD"
Glenn Ford (1970)

Notes

Ford and John Wayne are the only two actors to receive the Golden Spur Award, given in recognition of an outstanding Western star.

In addition to his WWII exploits, Ford served two tours of duty in Vietnam with the Third Marine Amphibious Force and is the only actor to have served with both the Green Berets and the French Foreign Legion. Among his numerous medals and commendations are the Medal of Honor, presented by the Veterans of Foreign Wars; the Medaille de la France Libre, for the liberation of France; two commendation medals from the US Navy; and the Vitnamese Legion of Merit.