Jubal


1h 41m 1956
Jubal

Brief Synopsis

A rancher's wife falls for a wandering cowhand.

Film Details

Also Known As
Jubal Troop
Genre
Drama
Western
Release Date
May 1956
Premiere Information
New York opening: 24 Apr 1956
Production Company
Columbia Pictures Corp.
Distribution Company
Columbia Pictures Corp.
Country
United States
Location
Grand Teton mountains of Wyoming, USA; The Grand Tetons, Wyoming, United States
Screenplay Information
Based on the novel Jubal Troop by Paul I. Wellman (New York, 1939).

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 41m
Sound
Mono
Color
Color (Technicolor)
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
2.35 : 1
Film Length
11 reels

Synopsis

Staggering out of the Wyoming high country, Jubal Troop, an itinerant cowhand, collapses from exhaustion and is found by Shep Horgan, a crude but big-hearted rancher, who gives the unconscious cowboy refuge at his ranch. Still suffering from his ordeal, Jubal awakens in the bunkhouse and there meets Shep's ranchhands: the honest, violin-playing Sam, the pernicious Pinky and Carson. When Jubal comments that he is dogged by bad luck, Shep advises him to stop running and offers him a job. After Jubal proves his mettle by breaking a cantankerous bronco, Mae, Shep's comely Canadian wife, flirts with him, but Jubal rebuffs her advances out of loyalty to Shep. Mae's interest in Jubal infuriates Pinky, her erstwhile love. Pinky becomes even more incensed when Shep offers Jubal the job of foreman. While riding the range one day, Pinky comes across a band of religious pilgrims known as the Rawhiders and tries to intimidate them. When Shem Hoktor, the group's leader, explains that several of their members are ill and need to rest, Reb Haislipp, a cowhand riding with the pilgrims, attests to the group's benevolence, and Jubal grants them permission to camp on the Shep's land. Jubal then offers Reb a job rounding up cattle. Back at the ranch, Pinky taunts Jubal about being attracted to Shem's pretty daughter Naomi. Overhearing their conversation, Mae reproaches Jubal for showing interest in another woman. When Jubal reiterates his loyalty to Shep, Mae venomously expresses her repulsion for her coarse husband, whom she married believing that he was a cattle baron. Appreciative of Jubal's hard work, Shep gives him the day off and suggests he visit Naomi. At the pilgrims' encampment, Naomi and Jubal discuss their mutual longing for a real home and Jubal confides that he ran away from home as a young boy, driven away by his hateful mother, who wished him dead. After Jubal departs, Jake Slavin, one of the pilgrims, rides after him and warns him to stay away from Naomi because she has been promised to him. While on a cattle drive, Jubal and the others set up camp, and soon after, Naomi arrives to tell Jubal that she and the others plan to leave at sunup. After sadly confirming that a marriage between her and Jake has been arranged, Naomi confesses that she detests Jake and asks Jubal to bestow her with her first kiss. That night, Mae rides into camp to deliver a report to Shep. Preoccupied with a poker game, Shep asks Jubal to accompany Mae on the short ride home. Upon reaching the ranch, Mae tries to entice Jubal, and after he rebuffs her and wordlessly rides off, she gazes after him in disbelief. Back at the camp, while the others sleep, Reb saddles up and rides off, after which Pinky awakens Shep to tell him that Jubal has not yet returned. When Pinky insinuates that Jubal is in Mae's arms, Shep, with a jealous, crazed glint in his eye, rides back to the ranch to find out the truth. Finding Mae slumbering alone in bed, Shep kisses her, causing her to call out Jubal's name. To retaliate against Jubal for his rejection, Mae lies that she and Jubal are lovers. Reb finds Jubal drinking at the saloon, and soon after, Shep stalks in carrying a loaded Winchester. Accusing Jubal of cuckolding him, Shep fires and Reb tosses the unarmed Jubal a pistol to defend himself. Wounded, Jubal has no choice but to gun down his friend. The cowhands who witnessed the shootout believe Shep's accusations and spread the word of Jubal's betrayal. Pinky gleefully rides to the ranch to inform Mae of her husband's demise, but when she spurns him once more, he becomes unhinged and savagely beats her. Reb, meanwhile, brings the wounded Jubal to Shem's camp and asks for help. When Jake objects to putting the others in danger by granting Jubal refuge, Shem decides to house Jubal in his wagon and split up from the others. Still bloodthirsty, Pinky returns to town and incites a mob to lynch Jubal. Naomi, meanwhile, comforts the agonized, remorseful Jubal by assuring him that he had no other choice but to shoot his friend. Soon after, Pinky and the mob catches up to the pilgrims' wagons, and Pinky realizes that the group must split up to protect Jubal. Jealous and spiteful, Jake tells Pinky where Jubal's wagon is hidden. Jubal, meanwhile, prepares to leave the wagon when Reb gallops up to warn him that Pinky and the posse are just minutes away. Quickly deciding that his only chance is to return to the ranch and force Mae to tell the truth, Jubal rides off and instructs Reb to lead the posse there. When Jake arrives leading the mob, Shem disowns him as a Rawhider, after which Reb informs Pinky that Jubal is waiting for him at the ranch. After Jubal finds Mae brutalized on the barn floor, she confesses that she lied to her husband and accepts responsibility for his death. When the posse arrives, Jubal walks out of the barn to confront Pinky. As Jubal wrestles with Pinky, Dr. Grant, a member of the posse, goes into the barn to treat Mae. Soon after, the doctor reemerges to announce that Mae is dead, but with her dying breath, testified that Pinky is liable for both her and Shep's death. Just then, Naomi arrives and is joined by Jubal and Reb, and they all ride off together.

Videos

Movie Clip

Jubal (1956) - Most Horses Is Better Than Humans First scene after the opening, in which rancher Shep (Ernest Borgnine) found Glenn Ford (title character) staggering out of the Wyoming woods, introducing Pinky (Rod Steiger), Sam (Noah Beery Jr.) and Carson (John Dierkes), in Jubal, 1956, directed by Delmer Daves, often cited as a Western treatment of Shakespeare’s Othello.
Jubal (1956) - They'll Steal You Blind Director Delmer Daves introduces key characters, as new ranch foreman Glenn Ford (title character) has to intervene when Pinky (Rod Steiger) and friends tangle with a caravan of Christian pilgrims (Basil Ruysdael as Shem Hoktor, Felicia Farr his daughter, Charles Bronson riding shotgun), in Jubal, 1956.
Jubal (1956) - We're Ending This Before It Starts Joining dinner with big-hearted rancher Shep (Ernest Borgnine) who’s taken a liking to his new hand (Glenn Ford, title character) and offers him a job, with no idea about the misdeeds of his youthful Canadian wife Mae (English ingenue Valerie French, in her first Hollywood role), in director Delmer Daves’ dark Western, Jubal, 1956.
Jubal (1956) - You Might Get Burned Glenn Ford (title character) is winning over folks at the Wyoming cattle ranch, where he was brought by the owner who found him wandering in the mountains, especially the rancher’s young wife Mae (Valerie French), whose intentions are barely disguised, in director Delmer Daves’ Jubal, 1956.
Jubal (1956) - Promised Land, I Guess If you wondered whey they were called “psychological Westerns,” ranch foreman Glenn Ford (title character) surprises himself, opening up to Naomi (Felicia Farr), whose father leads a band of pilgrims passing through, in Jubal, 1956, Delmer Daves directing from the screenplay he co-wrote with Russell S. Hughes, from a novel by Paul I. Wellman.

Hosted Intro

Film Details

Also Known As
Jubal Troop
Genre
Drama
Western
Release Date
May 1956
Premiere Information
New York opening: 24 Apr 1956
Production Company
Columbia Pictures Corp.
Distribution Company
Columbia Pictures Corp.
Country
United States
Location
Grand Teton mountains of Wyoming, USA; The Grand Tetons, Wyoming, United States
Screenplay Information
Based on the novel Jubal Troop by Paul I. Wellman (New York, 1939).

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 41m
Sound
Mono
Color
Color (Technicolor)
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
2.35 : 1
Film Length
11 reels

Articles

Jubal


Delmer Daves's Jubal (1956) was one of the new wave of adult westerns that flourished in the fifties. Starring Glenn Ford as a cowhand drifter befriended by a big-hearted rancher (Ernest Borgnine) while his beautiful, young, and deeply disenchanted wife (European starlet Valerie French, in her American debut) does her best to seduce the simple, stoic cowboy, it has been described as an Othello on the Range.

That characterization gets at the web of jealousy and desire manipulated by envious ranch hand Pinky (Rod Steiger, playing Iago to Borgnine's Othello) whose seniority is suddenly usurped by this outsider, but it confuses the details and motivations. In this take, the young wife is no innocent but a dark, exotic beauty (she's Canadian which is supposed to account for her French accent) in a stifling marriage to the sincere but crude and boisterous cattleman Borgnine; Steiger's cowhand is the spurned lover of the unfaithful wife. It's not even about the Othello or the Iago figures, but the drifter caught in the middle of the frustrated desires and desperate deceptions. This is less Shakespeare than Hollywood melodrama in chaps and Daves was a seasoned hand at both genres.

Delmer Daves had established himself as a screenwriter with a series of light comedies and romantic melodramas (including the original 1939 Love Affair) before stepping behind the camera with the World War II adventure Destination Tokyo (1943). Like most directors of his era, he moved easily between all genres, but he proved his affinity for the western from his very first effort, Broken Arrow (1950), one of the first sympathetic depictions of Native Americans. Along with his fine eye for imagery, Daves brought a psychological dimension and an adult sensibility to his westerns. With Jubal he favors suspense over action and violence, tightening the tension until Pinky finally pushes his boss over the edge and the cycle of violence begins. Even then, the violence is brief and abrupt and Daves leaves the most brutal assault off screen, a suggestion far more powerful than anything he could show the audience.

Glenn Ford had become a quietly intense leading man in the 1940s and seasoned into a natural western star by the time he was cast as the title character, Jubal Troop. It was his first of three westerns for Delmer Daves (they teamed up again the next year with 3:10 to Yuma, an austere, noir-ish western that remains a highlight of both of their careers) and a good match between director and actor. Ford plays the part of the wary loner close to his chest, opening up to his new boss, Shep (Borgnine), who becomes both father figure and best friend to the emotionally bottled up cowhand. Jubal opens up even more with a sweet young member of a religious wagon train passing through the ranch on the way to the promised land. Felicia Farr plays the blonde American innocent to French's exotic brunette, and Jubal practically opens the floodgates of his damaged childhood (revealing all the psychological baggage that sends him endlessly drifting) to this adoring girl.

Borgnine plays his part with a garrulous, boisterous amiability, the better to contrast with Ford's closed-in performance, while Noah Beery, Jr. and John Dierkes offer easy-going support as Ford's friendly bunkmates and fellow cowhands. Steiger stands out in this company with his mesmerizing but mannered method performance. His character, Pinky, is an even more devious version of the brooding, jealous cowhand he played in the screen version of the musical Oklahoma! (1955), and his drawling delivery drips venom as he plants the seeds of suspicion in his boss. Daves preferred the laconic style of the rest of the cast and clashed with Steiger, only giving way because the producer liked what Steiger was doing. It's a jarring performance next to Ford and Borgnine, but his coiled and calculated turn also enhances his menace.

Daves gave the key supporting part of Reb Haislipp, a plain-speaking cowhand whose loyalty to Jubal is unshakable even when Pinky turns the town against him, to the up-and-coming supporting player Charles Bronson. It was one of the first substantial supporting roles for the actor previously billed as Charles Buchinsky in such films as House of Wax (1953). He had changed his name just a year before in another Daves' western, Drum Beat (1954). For their second go-round, Daves brings out Bronson's easy-going humor and understated style, that was so rarely tapped by directors (the notable exceptions being The Magnificent Seven [1960] and The Dirty Dozen [1967]), and the film became a modest showcase for the actor's heretofore untapped potential.

Jubal was generally well received ("The strong point... along with ace performances and an overall plot line that grips tightly, is a constantly mounting suspense," reads the Variety review) and New York Times critic Bosley Crowther was inspired to write his mixed review in verse: "It does have its wide-screen points / Lovely scenery; good performing; /Smooth knee-action in the joints." Shot in the Grand Teton country of Wyoming in CinemaScope and Technicolor, Jubal remains an exceedingly handsome film and Daves fills the widescreen frame with the magnificent mountain backdrops and dramatic forests and rolling hills, without allowing the majesty to overwhelm the human drama.

Producer: William Fadiman
Director: Delmer Daves
Screenplay: Russell S. Hughes, Delmer Daves, Paul Wellman (novel)
Cinematography: Charles Lawton, Jr.
Film Editing: Al Clark
Art Direction: Carl Anderson
Music: David Raksin
Cast: Glenn Ford (Jubal Troop), Ernest Borgnine (Shep Horgan), Rod Steiger (Pinky Pinkum), Valerie French (Mae Horgan), Felicia Farr (Naomi Hoktor), Basil Ruysdael (Shem Hoktor).
C-101m. Letterboxed.

by Sean Axmaker
Jubal

Jubal

Delmer Daves's Jubal (1956) was one of the new wave of adult westerns that flourished in the fifties. Starring Glenn Ford as a cowhand drifter befriended by a big-hearted rancher (Ernest Borgnine) while his beautiful, young, and deeply disenchanted wife (European starlet Valerie French, in her American debut) does her best to seduce the simple, stoic cowboy, it has been described as an Othello on the Range. That characterization gets at the web of jealousy and desire manipulated by envious ranch hand Pinky (Rod Steiger, playing Iago to Borgnine's Othello) whose seniority is suddenly usurped by this outsider, but it confuses the details and motivations. In this take, the young wife is no innocent but a dark, exotic beauty (she's Canadian which is supposed to account for her French accent) in a stifling marriage to the sincere but crude and boisterous cattleman Borgnine; Steiger's cowhand is the spurned lover of the unfaithful wife. It's not even about the Othello or the Iago figures, but the drifter caught in the middle of the frustrated desires and desperate deceptions. This is less Shakespeare than Hollywood melodrama in chaps and Daves was a seasoned hand at both genres. Delmer Daves had established himself as a screenwriter with a series of light comedies and romantic melodramas (including the original 1939 Love Affair) before stepping behind the camera with the World War II adventure Destination Tokyo (1943). Like most directors of his era, he moved easily between all genres, but he proved his affinity for the western from his very first effort, Broken Arrow (1950), one of the first sympathetic depictions of Native Americans. Along with his fine eye for imagery, Daves brought a psychological dimension and an adult sensibility to his westerns. With Jubal he favors suspense over action and violence, tightening the tension until Pinky finally pushes his boss over the edge and the cycle of violence begins. Even then, the violence is brief and abrupt and Daves leaves the most brutal assault off screen, a suggestion far more powerful than anything he could show the audience. Glenn Ford had become a quietly intense leading man in the 1940s and seasoned into a natural western star by the time he was cast as the title character, Jubal Troop. It was his first of three westerns for Delmer Daves (they teamed up again the next year with 3:10 to Yuma, an austere, noir-ish western that remains a highlight of both of their careers) and a good match between director and actor. Ford plays the part of the wary loner close to his chest, opening up to his new boss, Shep (Borgnine), who becomes both father figure and best friend to the emotionally bottled up cowhand. Jubal opens up even more with a sweet young member of a religious wagon train passing through the ranch on the way to the promised land. Felicia Farr plays the blonde American innocent to French's exotic brunette, and Jubal practically opens the floodgates of his damaged childhood (revealing all the psychological baggage that sends him endlessly drifting) to this adoring girl. Borgnine plays his part with a garrulous, boisterous amiability, the better to contrast with Ford's closed-in performance, while Noah Beery, Jr. and John Dierkes offer easy-going support as Ford's friendly bunkmates and fellow cowhands. Steiger stands out in this company with his mesmerizing but mannered method performance. His character, Pinky, is an even more devious version of the brooding, jealous cowhand he played in the screen version of the musical Oklahoma! (1955), and his drawling delivery drips venom as he plants the seeds of suspicion in his boss. Daves preferred the laconic style of the rest of the cast and clashed with Steiger, only giving way because the producer liked what Steiger was doing. It's a jarring performance next to Ford and Borgnine, but his coiled and calculated turn also enhances his menace. Daves gave the key supporting part of Reb Haislipp, a plain-speaking cowhand whose loyalty to Jubal is unshakable even when Pinky turns the town against him, to the up-and-coming supporting player Charles Bronson. It was one of the first substantial supporting roles for the actor previously billed as Charles Buchinsky in such films as House of Wax (1953). He had changed his name just a year before in another Daves' western, Drum Beat (1954). For their second go-round, Daves brings out Bronson's easy-going humor and understated style, that was so rarely tapped by directors (the notable exceptions being The Magnificent Seven [1960] and The Dirty Dozen [1967]), and the film became a modest showcase for the actor's heretofore untapped potential. Jubal was generally well received ("The strong point... along with ace performances and an overall plot line that grips tightly, is a constantly mounting suspense," reads the Variety review) and New York Times critic Bosley Crowther was inspired to write his mixed review in verse: "It does have its wide-screen points / Lovely scenery; good performing; /Smooth knee-action in the joints." Shot in the Grand Teton country of Wyoming in CinemaScope and Technicolor, Jubal remains an exceedingly handsome film and Daves fills the widescreen frame with the magnificent mountain backdrops and dramatic forests and rolling hills, without allowing the majesty to overwhelm the human drama. Producer: William Fadiman Director: Delmer Daves Screenplay: Russell S. Hughes, Delmer Daves, Paul Wellman (novel) Cinematography: Charles Lawton, Jr. Film Editing: Al Clark Art Direction: Carl Anderson Music: David Raksin Cast: Glenn Ford (Jubal Troop), Ernest Borgnine (Shep Horgan), Rod Steiger (Pinky Pinkum), Valerie French (Mae Horgan), Felicia Farr (Naomi Hoktor), Basil Ruysdael (Shem Hoktor). C-101m. Letterboxed. by Sean Axmaker

Othello on the Range - Jubal (The 1956 Western)


After trudging through the desert, Glenn Ford collapses and rolls down a hill, landing on a road. Rescued and given a job by kindly rancher Ernest Borgnine, he proves himself to be such an adept cowpoke that Borgnine soon elevates him to ranch foreman. This incurs the jealousy of chief ranchhand Rod Steiger, who cruelly plots his revenge by making Borgnine think Ford is fooling around with Borgnine's wife, Valerie French. The truth is that French has made advances toward Ford, but Ford has spurned them out of love and respect for Borgnine. Borgnine is driven into a jealous frenzy and tragedy follows.

If this all sounds strangely familiar, it's because Jubal (1956) is very loosely inspired by Othello. The detailed intricacies of Shakespeare's tragedy aren't in this western, but the broad strokes are certainly here. The result is an OK movie, if a bit overly talky for a western. What Jubal really has going for it are spectacular photography (in the Jackson Hole, Wyoming area) and a good cast.

As Jubal Troop, the film's version of Cassio, Glenn Ford turns in a typically solid, sympathetic performance in the kind of role in which he excelled - a decent, morally upright man caught up in circumstances beyond his control which drive him to anger and action. (Perhaps no one else ever seethed better onscreen.) Steiger makes a good, if at times overwrought, western Iago (here named Pinky!). He employs a southern accent similar to the one he would use the following year for Sam Fuller's underrated Run of the Arrow. Borgnine is a wonderful presence as the story's Othello character, and the frame comes alive whenever he enters, laughing uproariously. Valerie French and lovely Felicia Farr are given "introducing" credits, but French had already made a British film and Farr had previously appeared in two movies and on television. Farr, who here plays a young Mormon woman smitten with Glenn Ford, later married Jack Lemmon. Supporting parts by Jack Elam, Noah Beery Jr., and a young Charles Bronson (who had recently shed his real last name, Buchinsky) add nice western flavor.

Jubal is one of a handful of Glenn Ford westerns recently released on DVD by Sony. The print looks decent but is by no means spectacular, as it shows some signs of color fading and slight graininess. It is, however, presented in its full CinemaScope glory. There are no extras. Glenn Ford is now nearly 89 years old and one hopes that he is enjoying seeing his movies reach new audiences via DVD.

For more information about Jubal, visit Sony Pictures. To order Jubal, go to TCM Shopping.

by Jeremy Arnold

Othello on the Range - Jubal (The 1956 Western)

After trudging through the desert, Glenn Ford collapses and rolls down a hill, landing on a road. Rescued and given a job by kindly rancher Ernest Borgnine, he proves himself to be such an adept cowpoke that Borgnine soon elevates him to ranch foreman. This incurs the jealousy of chief ranchhand Rod Steiger, who cruelly plots his revenge by making Borgnine think Ford is fooling around with Borgnine's wife, Valerie French. The truth is that French has made advances toward Ford, but Ford has spurned them out of love and respect for Borgnine. Borgnine is driven into a jealous frenzy and tragedy follows. If this all sounds strangely familiar, it's because Jubal (1956) is very loosely inspired by Othello. The detailed intricacies of Shakespeare's tragedy aren't in this western, but the broad strokes are certainly here. The result is an OK movie, if a bit overly talky for a western. What Jubal really has going for it are spectacular photography (in the Jackson Hole, Wyoming area) and a good cast. As Jubal Troop, the film's version of Cassio, Glenn Ford turns in a typically solid, sympathetic performance in the kind of role in which he excelled - a decent, morally upright man caught up in circumstances beyond his control which drive him to anger and action. (Perhaps no one else ever seethed better onscreen.) Steiger makes a good, if at times overwrought, western Iago (here named Pinky!). He employs a southern accent similar to the one he would use the following year for Sam Fuller's underrated Run of the Arrow. Borgnine is a wonderful presence as the story's Othello character, and the frame comes alive whenever he enters, laughing uproariously. Valerie French and lovely Felicia Farr are given "introducing" credits, but French had already made a British film and Farr had previously appeared in two movies and on television. Farr, who here plays a young Mormon woman smitten with Glenn Ford, later married Jack Lemmon. Supporting parts by Jack Elam, Noah Beery Jr., and a young Charles Bronson (who had recently shed his real last name, Buchinsky) add nice western flavor. Jubal is one of a handful of Glenn Ford westerns recently released on DVD by Sony. The print looks decent but is by no means spectacular, as it shows some signs of color fading and slight graininess. It is, however, presented in its full CinemaScope glory. There are no extras. Glenn Ford is now nearly 89 years old and one hopes that he is enjoying seeing his movies reach new audiences via DVD. For more information about Jubal, visit Sony Pictures. To order Jubal, go to TCM Shopping. by Jeremy Arnold

TCM Remembers Charles Bronson - Sept. 13th - TCM Remembers Charles Bronson this Saturday, Sept. 13th 2003.


Turner Classic Movies will honor the passing of Hollywood action star Charles Bronson on Saturday, Sept. 13, with a four-film tribute.

After years of playing supporting roles in numerous Western, action and war films, including THE MAGNIFICENT SEVEN (1960, 8 p.m.) and THE DIRTY DOZEN (1967, 1:15 a.m.), Bronson finally achieved worldwide stardom as a leading man during the late 1960s and early 1970s. TCM's tribute will also include THE GREAT ESCAPE (1963, 10:15 p.m.), Bronson's second teaming with Steve McQueen and James Coburn, and will conclude with FROM NOON TILL THREE (1976, 4 a.m.), co-starring Jill Ireland.

TCM will alter it's prime-time schedule this Saturday, Sept. 13th. The following changes will take place:

8:00 PM - The Magnificent Seven (1960)
10:15 PM - The Great Escape (1963)
1:15 AM - The Dirty Dozen (1967)
4:00 AM - From Noon Till Three (1976)

Charles Bronson, 1921-2003

Charles Bronson, the tough, stony-faced actor who was one of the most recognizable action heroes in cinema, died on August 30 in Los Angeles from complications from pneumonia. He was 81.

He was born Charles Buchinsky on November 3, 1921 in Ehrenfeld, Pennsylvania, one of fifteen children born to Lithuanian immigrant parents. Although he was the only child to have graduated high school, he worked in the coalmines to support his family until he joined the army to serve as a tail gunner during World War II. He used his money from the G.I. Bill to study art in Philadelphia, but while working as a set designer for a Philadelphia theater troupe, he landed a few small roles in some productions and immediately found acting to be the craft for him.

Bronson took his new career turn seriously, moved to California, and enrolled for acting classes at The Pasadena Playhouse. An instructor there recommended him to director Henry Hathaway for a movie role and the result was his debut in Hathaway's You're in the Navy Now (1951). He secured more bit parts in films like John Sturges' drama The People Against O'Hara (1951), and Joseph Newman's Bloodhounds of Broadway (1952). More substantial roles came in George Cukor's Pat and Mike (1952, where he is beaten up by Katharine Hepburn!); Andre de Toth's classic 3-D thriller House of Wax (1953, as Vincent Price's mute assistant, Igor); and De Toth's fine low-budget noir Crime Wave (1954).

Despite his formidable presence, his leads were confined to a string of B pictures like Gene Fowler's Gang War; and Roger Corman's tight Machine Gun Kelly (both 1958). Following his own television series, Man With a Camera (1958-60), Bronson had his first taste of film stardom when director Sturges casted him as Bernardo, one of the The Magnificent Seven (1960). Bronson displayed a powerful charisma, comfortably holding his own in a high-powered cast that included Yul Brynner and Steve McQueen. A few more solid roles followed in Sturges' The Great Escape (1963), and Robert Aldrich's classic war picture The Dirty Dozen (1967), before Bronson made the decision to follow the European trail of other American actors like Clint Eastwood and Lee Van Cleef. It was there that his hard, taciturn screen personae exploded in full force. In 1968 alone, he had four hit films: Henri Verneuil's Guns for San Sebastian, Buzz Kulik's Villa Rides, Jean Herman's Adieu l'ami which was a smash in France; and the classic Sergio Leone spaghetti Western Once Upon a Time in the West.

These films established Bronson as a huge box-office draw in Europe, and with some more stylish hits like Rene Clement's Rider on the Rain (1969), and Terence Young's Cold Sweat (1971) he soon became one of the most popular film stars in the world. It wasn't easy for Bronson to translate that success back in his homeland. In fact, his first few films on his return stateside: Michael Winners' Chato's Land, and The Mechanic (both 1972), and Richard Fleischer's Mr. Majestyk (1973), were surprisingly routine pictures. It wasn't until he collaborated with Winner again for the controversial Death Wish (1974), an urban revenge thriller about an architect who turns vigilante when his wife and daughter are raped, did he notch his first stateside hit. The next few years would be a fruitful period for Bronson as he rode on a wave of fine films and commercial success: a depression era streetfighter in Walter Hill's terrific, if underrated Hard Times (1975); Frank Gilroy's charming offbeat black comedy From Noon Till Three (1976, the best of many teamings with his second wife, Jill Ireland); Tom Gries tense Breakheart Pass; and Don Siegel's cold-war thriller Telefon (1977).

Sadly, Bronson could not keep up the momentum of good movies, and by the '80s he was starring in a string of forgettable films like Ten to Midnight (1983), The Evil That Men Do (1984), and Murphy's Law (1986, all directed by J. Lee Thompson). A notable exception to all that tripe was John Mackenzie's fine telefilm Act of Vengeance (1986), where he earned critical acclaim in the role of United Mine Workers official Jack Yablonski. Although he more or less fell into semi-retirement in the '90s, his performances in Sean Penn's The Indian Runner (1991); and the title role of Michael Anderson's The Sea Wolf (1993) proved to many that Bronson had the makings of a fine character actor. He was married to actress Jill Ireland from 1968 until her death from breast cancer in 1990. He is survived by his third wife Kim Weeks, six children, and two grandchildren.

by Michael T. Toole

TCM Remembers Charles Bronson - Sept. 13th - TCM Remembers Charles Bronson this Saturday, Sept. 13th 2003.

Turner Classic Movies will honor the passing of Hollywood action star Charles Bronson on Saturday, Sept. 13, with a four-film tribute. After years of playing supporting roles in numerous Western, action and war films, including THE MAGNIFICENT SEVEN (1960, 8 p.m.) and THE DIRTY DOZEN (1967, 1:15 a.m.), Bronson finally achieved worldwide stardom as a leading man during the late 1960s and early 1970s. TCM's tribute will also include THE GREAT ESCAPE (1963, 10:15 p.m.), Bronson's second teaming with Steve McQueen and James Coburn, and will conclude with FROM NOON TILL THREE (1976, 4 a.m.), co-starring Jill Ireland. TCM will alter it's prime-time schedule this Saturday, Sept. 13th. The following changes will take place: 8:00 PM - The Magnificent Seven (1960) 10:15 PM - The Great Escape (1963) 1:15 AM - The Dirty Dozen (1967) 4:00 AM - From Noon Till Three (1976) Charles Bronson, 1921-2003 Charles Bronson, the tough, stony-faced actor who was one of the most recognizable action heroes in cinema, died on August 30 in Los Angeles from complications from pneumonia. He was 81. He was born Charles Buchinsky on November 3, 1921 in Ehrenfeld, Pennsylvania, one of fifteen children born to Lithuanian immigrant parents. Although he was the only child to have graduated high school, he worked in the coalmines to support his family until he joined the army to serve as a tail gunner during World War II. He used his money from the G.I. Bill to study art in Philadelphia, but while working as a set designer for a Philadelphia theater troupe, he landed a few small roles in some productions and immediately found acting to be the craft for him. Bronson took his new career turn seriously, moved to California, and enrolled for acting classes at The Pasadena Playhouse. An instructor there recommended him to director Henry Hathaway for a movie role and the result was his debut in Hathaway's You're in the Navy Now (1951). He secured more bit parts in films like John Sturges' drama The People Against O'Hara (1951), and Joseph Newman's Bloodhounds of Broadway (1952). More substantial roles came in George Cukor's Pat and Mike (1952, where he is beaten up by Katharine Hepburn!); Andre de Toth's classic 3-D thriller House of Wax (1953, as Vincent Price's mute assistant, Igor); and De Toth's fine low-budget noir Crime Wave (1954). Despite his formidable presence, his leads were confined to a string of B pictures like Gene Fowler's Gang War; and Roger Corman's tight Machine Gun Kelly (both 1958). Following his own television series, Man With a Camera (1958-60), Bronson had his first taste of film stardom when director Sturges casted him as Bernardo, one of the The Magnificent Seven (1960). Bronson displayed a powerful charisma, comfortably holding his own in a high-powered cast that included Yul Brynner and Steve McQueen. A few more solid roles followed in Sturges' The Great Escape (1963), and Robert Aldrich's classic war picture The Dirty Dozen (1967), before Bronson made the decision to follow the European trail of other American actors like Clint Eastwood and Lee Van Cleef. It was there that his hard, taciturn screen personae exploded in full force. In 1968 alone, he had four hit films: Henri Verneuil's Guns for San Sebastian, Buzz Kulik's Villa Rides, Jean Herman's Adieu l'ami which was a smash in France; and the classic Sergio Leone spaghetti Western Once Upon a Time in the West. These films established Bronson as a huge box-office draw in Europe, and with some more stylish hits like Rene Clement's Rider on the Rain (1969), and Terence Young's Cold Sweat (1971) he soon became one of the most popular film stars in the world. It wasn't easy for Bronson to translate that success back in his homeland. In fact, his first few films on his return stateside: Michael Winners' Chato's Land, and The Mechanic (both 1972), and Richard Fleischer's Mr. Majestyk (1973), were surprisingly routine pictures. It wasn't until he collaborated with Winner again for the controversial Death Wish (1974), an urban revenge thriller about an architect who turns vigilante when his wife and daughter are raped, did he notch his first stateside hit. The next few years would be a fruitful period for Bronson as he rode on a wave of fine films and commercial success: a depression era streetfighter in Walter Hill's terrific, if underrated Hard Times (1975); Frank Gilroy's charming offbeat black comedy From Noon Till Three (1976, the best of many teamings with his second wife, Jill Ireland); Tom Gries tense Breakheart Pass; and Don Siegel's cold-war thriller Telefon (1977). Sadly, Bronson could not keep up the momentum of good movies, and by the '80s he was starring in a string of forgettable films like Ten to Midnight (1983), The Evil That Men Do (1984), and Murphy's Law (1986, all directed by J. Lee Thompson). A notable exception to all that tripe was John Mackenzie's fine telefilm Act of Vengeance (1986), where he earned critical acclaim in the role of United Mine Workers official Jack Yablonski. Although he more or less fell into semi-retirement in the '90s, his performances in Sean Penn's The Indian Runner (1991); and the title role of Michael Anderson's The Sea Wolf (1993) proved to many that Bronson had the makings of a fine character actor. He was married to actress Jill Ireland from 1968 until her death from breast cancer in 1990. He is survived by his third wife Kim Weeks, six children, and two grandchildren. by Michael T. Toole

TCM Remembers - Rod Steiger


ROD STEIGER, 1925 - 2002

From the docks of New York to the rural back roads of Mississippi to the war torn Russian steppes, Rod Steiger reveled in creating some of the most overpowering and difficult men on the screen. He could be a total scoundrel, embodying Machiavelli's idiom that "it's better to be feared than loved" in the movies. But as an actor he refused to be typecast and his wide range included characters who were secretly tormented (The Pawnbroker, 1965) or loners (Run of the Arrow, 1965) or eccentrics (The Loved One, 1965).

Along with Marlon Brando, Steiger helped bring the 'Method School' from the Group Theater and Actors Studio in New York to the screens of Hollywood. The Method technique, taught by Stella Adler and Lee Strasberg, insisted on complete immersion into the character's psyche and resulted in intense, dramatic performances and performers. Steiger made his first significant screen appearance as Brando's older brother in On the Waterfront (1954). Their climatic scene together in a taxicab is one of the great moments in American cinema.

It was a short leap from playing a crooked lawyer in On the Waterfront to playing the shady boxing promoter in The Harder They Fall (1956). Based on the tragic tale of true-life fighter Primo Carnera, The Harder They Fall details the corruption behind the scenes of professional boxing bouts. Steiger is a fight manager named Nick Benko who enlists newspaperman Eddie Willis (Humphrey Bogart in his final screen appearance) to drum up publicity for a fixed prizefight. While the boxing scenes were often brutally realistic, the most powerful dramatic moments took place between Steiger and Bogart on the sidelines.

As mob boss Al Capone (1959), Steiger got to play another man you loved to hate. He vividly depicted the criminal from his swaggering early days to his pathetic demise from syphilis. In Doctor Zhivago (1965), Steiger was the only American in the international cast, playing the hateful and perverse Komarovsky. During the production of Dr. Zhivago, Steiger often found himself at odds with director David Lean. Schooled in the British tradition, Lean valued the integrity of the script and demanded that actors remain faithful to the script. Steiger, on the other hand, relied on improvisation and spontaneity. When kissing the lovely Lara (played by Julie Christie), Steiger jammed his tongue into Christie's mouth to produce the desired reaction - disgust. It worked! While it might not have been Lean's approach, it brought a grittier edge to the prestige production and made Komarovsky is a detestable but truly memorable figure.

Steiger dared audiences to dislike him. As the smalltown southern Sheriff Gillespie in In The Heat of the Night (1967), Steiger embodied all the prejudices and suspicions of a racist. When a black northern lawyer, played by Sidney Poitier, arrives on the crime scene, Gillespie is forced to recognize his fellow man as an equal despite skin color. Here, Steiger's character started as a bigot and developed into a better man. He finally claimed a Best Actor Academy Award for his performance as Sheriff Gillespie.

Steiger was an actor's actor. A chameleon who didn't think twice about diving into challenging roles that others would shy away from. In the Private Screenings interview he did with host Robert Osborne he admitted that Paul Muni was one of his idols because of his total immersion into his roles. Steiger said, "I believe actors are supposed to create different human beings." And Steiger showed us a rich and diverse cross section of them.

by Jeremy Geltzer & Jeff Stafford

TCM Remembers - Rod Steiger

ROD STEIGER, 1925 - 2002 From the docks of New York to the rural back roads of Mississippi to the war torn Russian steppes, Rod Steiger reveled in creating some of the most overpowering and difficult men on the screen. He could be a total scoundrel, embodying Machiavelli's idiom that "it's better to be feared than loved" in the movies. But as an actor he refused to be typecast and his wide range included characters who were secretly tormented (The Pawnbroker, 1965) or loners (Run of the Arrow, 1965) or eccentrics (The Loved One, 1965). Along with Marlon Brando, Steiger helped bring the 'Method School' from the Group Theater and Actors Studio in New York to the screens of Hollywood. The Method technique, taught by Stella Adler and Lee Strasberg, insisted on complete immersion into the character's psyche and resulted in intense, dramatic performances and performers. Steiger made his first significant screen appearance as Brando's older brother in On the Waterfront (1954). Their climatic scene together in a taxicab is one of the great moments in American cinema. It was a short leap from playing a crooked lawyer in On the Waterfront to playing the shady boxing promoter in The Harder They Fall (1956). Based on the tragic tale of true-life fighter Primo Carnera, The Harder They Fall details the corruption behind the scenes of professional boxing bouts. Steiger is a fight manager named Nick Benko who enlists newspaperman Eddie Willis (Humphrey Bogart in his final screen appearance) to drum up publicity for a fixed prizefight. While the boxing scenes were often brutally realistic, the most powerful dramatic moments took place between Steiger and Bogart on the sidelines. As mob boss Al Capone (1959), Steiger got to play another man you loved to hate. He vividly depicted the criminal from his swaggering early days to his pathetic demise from syphilis. In Doctor Zhivago (1965), Steiger was the only American in the international cast, playing the hateful and perverse Komarovsky. During the production of Dr. Zhivago, Steiger often found himself at odds with director David Lean. Schooled in the British tradition, Lean valued the integrity of the script and demanded that actors remain faithful to the script. Steiger, on the other hand, relied on improvisation and spontaneity. When kissing the lovely Lara (played by Julie Christie), Steiger jammed his tongue into Christie's mouth to produce the desired reaction - disgust. It worked! While it might not have been Lean's approach, it brought a grittier edge to the prestige production and made Komarovsky is a detestable but truly memorable figure. Steiger dared audiences to dislike him. As the smalltown southern Sheriff Gillespie in In The Heat of the Night (1967), Steiger embodied all the prejudices and suspicions of a racist. When a black northern lawyer, played by Sidney Poitier, arrives on the crime scene, Gillespie is forced to recognize his fellow man as an equal despite skin color. Here, Steiger's character started as a bigot and developed into a better man. He finally claimed a Best Actor Academy Award for his performance as Sheriff Gillespie. Steiger was an actor's actor. A chameleon who didn't think twice about diving into challenging roles that others would shy away from. In the Private Screenings interview he did with host Robert Osborne he admitted that Paul Muni was one of his idols because of his total immersion into his roles. Steiger said, "I believe actors are supposed to create different human beings." And Steiger showed us a rich and diverse cross section of them. by Jeremy Geltzer & Jeff Stafford

Quotes

Trivia

Notes

The working title of this film was Jubal Troop. Although onscreen credits read "introducing Felicia Farr," Farr had previously appeared in the United Artists film Timetable . According to an October 1942 Hollywood Reporter news item and an August 1943 Los Angeles Examiner news item, producer-director Sam Wood purchased the rights to Paul I. Wellman's novel in 1942, intending to cast Gary Cooper and Irene Dunne in the lead roles. The project was shelved, however, after Wood's death on 22 September 1949.
       In August 1953, a Daily Variety news item announced that Alan Ladd was to star in the film. Raoul Walsh was to direct the Ladd version. According to the Daily Variety review, location filming was done in the Grand Teton country of Wyoming. The Hollywood Reporter review notes that the film Jubal dealt with only a small part of Wellman's novel. Jubal marked the American screen debut of British actress Valerie French. According to a June 1956 Los Angeles Times news item, the studio considered filming another portion of the novel with Glenn Ford, but that project never reached fruition.


Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States Spring May 1956

CinemaScope

Released in United States Spring May 1956