George C Scott


Actor
George C Scott

About

Also Known As
George Campbell Scott
Birth Place
Wise, Virginia, USA
Born
October 18, 1927
Died
September 22, 1999
Cause of Death
Ruptured Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm

Biography

George C. Scott was that rare blend of superstar and character actor, a performer of enormous power and charisma who could carry a film just as easily as he could steal it. Fellow actor Jose Ferrer described Scott?s intense acting style as ?a concentrated fury, a sense of inner rage, a kind of controlled madness.? An Oscar winner as Best Actor for Patton (1970), Scott was also nominated...

Family & Companions

Carolyn Hughes
Wife
Divorced.
Patricia Reed
Wife
Former folksinger, actor, political appointee. Headed New York Office of Film and Television Production.
Colleen Dewhurst
Wife
Actor. Twice married and divorced: married in 1960; divorced in July 1965; remarried on July 4, 1967; divorced on February 2, 1972; died on August 22, 1991; met in Circle in the Square production of "Children of Darkness" (1958).
Ava Gardner
Companion
Actor. Co-starred in "The Bible" (1966); involved for several years in mid-1960s.

Notes

At the time of his death, Scott was working on his memoirs.

"You've got to be three different people. You have to be a human being. Then you have to be the character you're playing. And on top of that you've got to be the guy sitting out there in Row 10, watching yourself and judging yourself." --George C Scott, quoted in "The Great Movie Stars", Volume 2, by David Shipman

Biography

George C. Scott was that rare blend of superstar and character actor, a performer of enormous power and charisma who could carry a film just as easily as he could steal it. Fellow actor Jose Ferrer described Scott?s intense acting style as ?a concentrated fury, a sense of inner rage, a kind of controlled madness.?

An Oscar winner as Best Actor for Patton (1970), Scott was also nominated in that category for The Hospital (1971) and in the Supporting Actor category for Anatomy of a Murder (1959) and The Hustler (1961). Despite his disdain for awards as ?meat parades,? he scored numerous other wins or nominations for his extensive work in television and upon the stage.

George Campbell Scott was born October 18, 1927, in Wise, Va. His mother died when he was eight, leaving his father, an automotive executive, to raise him. Scott?s original ambition was to become a writer, but he was never able to finish a novel to his satisfaction. He served in the U.S. Marine Corps from 1945-49 and graduated from the University of Missouri in 1953.

After acting in summer stock, Scott gained the first major attention for his stage work with Joseph Papp?s New York Shakespeare Festival, winning a 1958 Obie award for his roles in Children of Darkness, As You Like It and Richard III. It was during this period that Scott first performed with his future wife, the equally dynamic Colleen Dewhurst. (He had two previous wives, Carolyn Hughes and Patricia Reed, and would marry a fourth, actress Trish Van Devere, in 1972.)

Scott made his film debut in a small but explosive role in a Gary Cooper Western, The Hanging Tree (1959), playing a fire-and-brimstone preacher. Next came Otto Preminger?s Anatomy of a Murder and that first Oscar nomination, for playing the coldly sarcastic prosecutor opposite James Stewart?s defense attorney. The second nomination was earned for the hard-nosed, fast-talking promoter of The Hustler. Scott laid down these roles with such authority that he was given his first film lead, in John Huston?s The List of Adrian Messenger (1963), in which he plays an irascible Scotland Yard inspector.

It now seems odd that Scott wasn?t nominated for his turn in Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb (1964) as the hilariously obtuse General Buck Turgidson. Perhaps it had something to do with the fact that he was already rejecting awards recognition. His other projects of the 1960s included chapters in two episodic films, The Yellow Rolls-Royce (1964), and The Bible ? In the Beginning (1966), in which he plays Abraham. The offbeat romance Petulia (1968), directed by Richard Lester, gave Scott one of his most sympathetic roles as a divorced surgeon who falls for a free spirit (Julie Christie).

The role of General George S. Patton, the thorny and celebrated World War II commander, was coveted by John Wayne and turned down by Spencer Tracy, Robert Mitchum, Rod Steiger and Lee Marvin. Scott took on the role in Patton, he said, because ?he was a professional and I admire professionalism.? The film was a huge success, winning seven Oscars including one as Best Picture and another as Best Actor, which Scott famously turned down.

The fame and notoriety led to a rash of film roles for Scott including an alcoholic doctor in the black comedy The Hospital, and a delusional man in They Might Be Giants (both 1971), opposite Joanne Woodward as his psychiatrist. Scott made his debut as a film director with Rage (1972, TCM premiere), in which he also stars. He personifies that title as well as any actor probably could, in the role of a father who goes berserk when his son and the animals on their sheep ranch die after being exposed to poison gas by the military.

Scott, who had often worked onstage with then-wife Colleen Dewhurst, also appeared frequently opposite his last wife, Trish Van Devere ? to the point that jokes were sometimes made about his professional faithfulness. Scott and Devere?s films together included The Last Run (1971), The Day of the Dolphin (1973), The Savage Is Loose (1974), Movie Movie (1978) and The Changeling (1980).

Other highlights of George C. Scott?s later film career include Oklahoma Crude (1973), The Hindenburg (1975), Islands in the Stream (1977), The Formula (1980), Taps (1981) and The Exorcist III (1990). His final theatrical film was Sidney Lumet?s remake of the John Cassavetes script Gloria (1999), with Sharon Stone as the gun moll of the title and Scott as Ruby, her gangster ex-lover. Scott died in September of that year in Westlake Village, Calif.

Scott returned to stage work throughout his career. He had made his Broadway debut in 1958 opposite Judith Anderson in Comes a Day, for which he earned a Tony Award nomination. Other nominations came for The Andersonville Trial, Uncle Vanya, Death of a Salesman and Inherit the Wind. His many other illustrious Broadway roles included those in Antony and Cleopatra, Plaza Suite, The Little Foxes, Three Sisters, On Borrowed Time and Desire Under the Elms.

Television was also very significant for Scott, who repeated many of his stage triumphs for the TV cameras as well as acting in original teleplays and TV movies. In 1963-64 he starred in East Side, West Side, a critically acclaimed NBC-TV series that ran for a season and earned Scott an Emmy nomination. He won the award itself for The Price (1969) and 12 Angry Men (1997), with additional nominations for Ben Casey (1961), The Crucible (1969), Jane Eyre (1970), Beauty and the Beast (1976) and A Christmas Carol (1984).

Filmography

 

Director (Feature Film)

The Savage Is Loose (1974)
Director
Rage (1972)
Director

Cast (Feature Film)

Inherit the Wind (1999)
Gloria (1999)
Rocky Marciano (1999)
12 Angry Men (1997)
Juror No 3
Country Justice (1997)
Clayton Harris
Titanic (1996)
Tyson (1995)
Angus (1995)
Grandpa Ivan
In the Heat of the Night: A Matter of Justice (1994)
Curacao (1993)
Malice (1993)
Finding the Way Home (1991)
Max Mittelmann
Descending Angel (1990)
Florian Stroia
The Rescuers Down Under (1990)
Voice
The Exorcist III (1989)
The Ryan White Story (1989)
Pals (1987)
The Murders in the Rue Morgue (1986)
Choices (1986)
The Last Days of Patton (1986)
General George S Patton Jr
The Indomitable Teddy Roosevelt (1984)
Narration
Firestarter (1984)
A Christmas Carol (1984)
Ebenezer Scrooge
China Rose (1983)
The Beastmaster (1982)
Oliver Twist (1982)
Fagin
Taps (1981)
The Formula (1980)
The Changeling (1979)
John Russell
Hardcore (1979)
Jake Van Dorn
Arthur Miller on Home Ground (1979)
Himself
Movie Movie (1978)
Crossed Swords (1978)
Ruffler
Islands In The Stream (1977)
Beauty and the Beast (1976)
The Beast
Fear on Trial (1975)
The Hindenburg (1975)
Bank Shot (1974)
Ballantine
The Savage Is Loose (1974)
John
The Day of the Dolphin (1973)
Oklahoma Crude (1973)
The New Centurions (1972)
[Andy] Kilvinski
Rage (1972)
Dan Logan
The Last Run (1971)
Harry Garmes
The Hospital (1971)
Dr. [Herbert] Bock
They Might Be Giants (1971)
Justin [Playfair, also known as Sherlock Holmes]
Jane Eyre (1971)
Edward Rochester
Patton (1970)
Gen. George S. Patton, Jr.
This Savage Land (1969)
Jud Barker
Petulia (1968)
Archie Bollen
The Flim-Flam Man (1967)
Mordecai Jones
The Bible...In the Beginning (1966)
Abraham
Not With My Wife, You Don't! (1966)
"Tank" Martin
The Yellow Rolls-Royce (1965)
Paolo Maltese
Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned To Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb (1964)
Gen. "Buck" Turgidson
The List of Adrian Messenger (1963)
Anthony Gethryn
The Hustler (1961)
Bert Gordon
The Hanging Tree (1959)
George Grubb
Anatomy of a Murder (1959)
Claude Dancer
A Tale of Two Cities (1958)

Producer (Feature Film)

The Savage Is Loose (1974)
Producer

Misc. Crew (Feature Film)

Arthur Miller on Home Ground (1979)
Other

Cast (Special)

Gary Cooper: The Face of a Hero (1998)
Interviewee
The Searchers (1997)
Narration
James Earl Jones (1995)
The Life and Times of Gary Cooper (1995)
Interviewee
The All-Star Salute to Our Troops (1991)
The 20th Annual NAACP Image Awards (1988)
Performer
The Television Academy Hall of Fame (1987)
Performer
The Indomitable Teddy Roosevelt (1986)
Narrator
Bob Hope Special: Happy Birthday, Bob! (1983)
Bob Hope Special: Bob Hope's All-Star Comedy Birthday Party at West Point (1981)
The First 50 Years (1976)
Power and the Presidency (1974)
Narration
Super Comedy Bowl 2 (1972)
The Trouble with People (1972)
Driver (Story 2)
A Salute to Television's 25th Anniversary (1972)
The Price (1971)
Victor
Mirror, Mirror, Off the Wall (1969)
Max/Rome
The Picture of Dorian Gray (1961)
Lord Henry Wotton
The Power and the Glory (1961)
Police Lieutenant
The Burning Court (1960)
Gordon Cross
Winterset (1959)
Trock

Cast (Short)

Portrait of an Actor (1971)
Himself
The Car That Became a Star (1964)
Himself

Cast (TV Mini-Series)

Titanic: The Survivors Story (1996)
The Whipping Boy (1994)
Cartoon All-Stars to the Rescue (1990)
Voice
Mussolini: The Untold Story (1985)
Benito Mussolini

Life Events

1945

Served four years in the Marine Corps.

1957

New York stage debut as "Richard III", New York Shakespeare Festival

1958

TV acting debut, "I Haven't Seen Her Lately" (episode of "Kraft Mystery Theater")

1959

Screen debut in "The Hanging Tree"

1961

Founded the Theatre of Michigan Company (with Theodore Mann)

1962

Broadway producing debut,"Great Day in the Morning" (starring Colleen Dewhurst)

1965

London stage debut, "The Three Sisters"

1967

Dropped out of directing "Dr Cook's Garden" on Broadway before first preview

1970

TV directing debut (also star), "The Andersonville Trial"

1972

Screen directorial debut, "Rage"

1975

Screen producing debut (also director) "The Savage is Loose"

1975

Broadway directorial debut, "Death of a Salesman" (also star)

1990

Suffered heart attack

1996

Withdrew from the Broadway production of "Inherit the Wind" over health problems

1997

Co-starred in the small screen remake of "12 Angry Men"

1999

Appeared opposite Jack Lemmon in Showtime remake of "Inherit the Wind"

Photo Collections

Patton - Movie Poster
Patton - Movie Poster
The Hindenburg - Movie Poster
The Hindenburg - Movie Poster

Videos

Movie Clip

Hardcore (1979) — (Movie Clip) Bless All Our Missionaries A Spartan, Calvinist Christmas in Grand Rapids, Michigan (shot on location, and the exact background of writer-director Paul Schrader), George C. Scott as single father furniture-business owner Van Dorn, the head of the family, Dick Sargent a brother-in-law, Ilah Davis his daughter preparing, with a cousin, for a church trip to California, in Hardcore, 1979.
Hardcore (1979) — (Movie Clip) These Are The Realities In Los Angeles after the disappearance of his daughter on a church youth trip, Michigan Calvinist businessman Van Dorn (George C. Scott, with Dick Sargent, his brother-in-law) grapples with an L-A cop then with P-I Mast (Peter Boyle), in the uncompromising early feature by Calvinist-raised Grand Rapids native Paul Schrader, Hardcore, 1979.
Dr. Strangelove (1964) - Doomsday Machine President Muffley (Peter Sellers) asks Ambassador de Sadesky (Peter Bull) why the Soviets would build a "Doomsday Machine," leading to the first appearance of the title character (also Sellers), in the war room during the nuclear crisis, in Stanley Kubrick's Dr. Strangelove Or: How I Learned To Stop Worrying And Love The Bomb, 1964.
Dr. Strangelove (1964) - Get Premier Kissoff In the war room, President Muffley (Peter Sellers) entertaining advice from General Turgidson (George C. Scott), whose renegade commander has ordered a nuclear attack on the Soviet Union, in Stanley Kubrick's Dr. Strangelove Or: How I Learned To Stop Worrying And Love The Bomb, 1964.
Petulia (1968) - Open, Road Block Opening with credits and it appears neither director Richard Lester nor later-legendary editor Antony Gibbs was focused on getting much performance from Janis Joplin and her band, more about George C. Scott, title character Julie Christie, and her spouse Richard Chamberlain, at a San Francisco benefit, in Petulia, 1968.
Petulia (1968) - That's Kind Of Sickening Still in the same outfit from their absurd non-sexual encounter the night before, married title-character Julie Christie shows up with the tuba they’d only talked about, at the mod San Francisco apartment of divorcing doctor Archie (George C. Scott), who ends up calling pal Arthur Hill, in director Richard Lester’s stubbornly unorthodox Petulia, 1968.
Petulia (1968) - That's Sex For You Soon to be divorced San Francisco doctor Archie (George C. Scott) returns home to find Julie Christie (title character) beaten to near-death, which will be explained later by director Richard Lester, who now uses Grateful Dead members (Phil Lesh, Mickey Hart, Jerry Garcia and Bob Weir) as gawkers, in Petulia, 1968.
Bible: In The Beginning... The (1966) - A Man Called Abram After a bad episode with the Tower of Babel, director John Huston still narrating, loosely from Genesis, the first reference to a promised land and the introduction of George C. Scott as Abram (a.k.a. Abraham), and Ava Gardner as his wife Sarah, in the American-Italian The Bible: In The Beginning…, 1966.
Anatomy Of A Murder (1959) - I've Seen Him In Action Hot-shot prosecutor Dancer (George C. Scott) entering the courthouse as the judge (Joseph N. Welch) briefs the jury, the local DA (Brooks West) and his defense attorney opponent Biegler (James Stewart) taking his measure, in Otto Preminger's Anatomy Of A Murder, 1959.
Yellow Rolls Royce, The (1964) - We Have Nothing Armor-Plated Beginning the second of three stories linked by the car, we meet American gangster Paolo (George C. Scott), his aide (Art Carney) and moll Mae (Shirley MacLaine), greeted by a salesman (Riccardo Garrone ) in Genoa, in The Yellow Rolls Royce. 1964.
Flim-Flam Man, The (1967) - Who You Runnin' From? In the opening Michael Sarazin rescued George C. Scott, who was thrown from a freight train onto which he’d just hopped, and they formalize their acquaintance in an empty boxcar, in The Flim-Flam Man, 1967, from the polymath director Irvin Kershner, later known for The Empire Strikes Back, 1980.
Flim-Flam Man, The (1967) - I Am Forgetting My Calling Working their second scam, con-man Mordecai (George C. Scott) poses as a minister and his hesitant protegè Curley (Michael Sarazin) as an accident victim, seeking transport, Alice Ghostley and Sue Lyon introduced as their rural mother and daughter marks, in The Flim-Flam Man, 1967.

Trailer

Family

George C Scott
Father
Former miner, executive.
Helena Scott
Mother
Died when Scott was eight years old c. 1936.
Victoria Scott
Daughter
Mother, Carolyn Hughes.
Matthew Scott
Son
Mother, Patricia Reed Scott.
Devon Scott
Daughter
Former actor. Mother, Patricia Reed Scott.
Alexander Scott
Son
Theatrical stage manager, writer. Born in 1961; mother, Colleen Dewhurst.
Campbell Scott
Son
Actor. Born in 1962; mother, Colleen Dewhurst.

Companions

Carolyn Hughes
Wife
Divorced.
Patricia Reed
Wife
Former folksinger, actor, political appointee. Headed New York Office of Film and Television Production.
Colleen Dewhurst
Wife
Actor. Twice married and divorced: married in 1960; divorced in July 1965; remarried on July 4, 1967; divorced on February 2, 1972; died on August 22, 1991; met in Circle in the Square production of "Children of Darkness" (1958).
Ava Gardner
Companion
Actor. Co-starred in "The Bible" (1966); involved for several years in mid-1960s.
Trish Van Devere
Wife
Actor. Born on March 9, 1945; married on September 14, 1972.

Bibliography

Notes

At the time of his death, Scott was working on his memoirs.

"You've got to be three different people. You have to be a human being. Then you have to be the character you're playing. And on top of that you've got to be the guy sitting out there in Row 10, watching yourself and judging yourself." --George C Scott, quoted in "The Great Movie Stars", Volume 2, by David Shipman

"I became an actor to escape my own personality. Acting is the most therapeutic thing in the world. I think all the courage that I may lack personally I have as an actor." --George C. Scott, quoted in "Earl Blackwell's Celebrity Register", 1991

Scott continued his long association (since 1958) with the Circle in the Square theater: in 1982 he starred in and directed a highly praised production of Noel Coward's "Present Laughter", in 1984 he directed Coward's "Design for Living", in 1986 he played an adult Huck Finn to John Cullum's aging Tom Sawyer in "Boys in Autumn", and in 1991 he directed and starred as the grandfather in Paul Osborn's 1938 fantasy-comedy "On Borrowed Time".