The Beastmaster


1h 58m 1982
The Beastmaster

Brief Synopsis

Armed with supernatural powers, the handsome hero and his animal allies wage war against marauding forces.

Film Details

Also Known As
Beastmaster, Dar l'invincible
MPAA Rating
PG
Genre
Adventure
Action
Adaptation
Fantasy
Release Date
1982
Location
Simi Valley, California, USA; Lake Pyramid, California, USA; Valley of Fire State Park, Nevada, USA; Arizona; Simi Valley, California, USA; Valley of Fire State Park, Nevada, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 58m

Synopsis

The son of a king, Dar is ripped from his mother's womb by the cruel sorcerer Maax. Maax's plan to sacrifice the infant is thwarted by a villager who intervenes and saves Dar, raising him as his own son and teaching him to fight while observing the boy's remarkable ability to communicate with animals. When Maax's warriors attack the village, killing Dar's father figure, Dar swears vengeance. He is helped in his mission by one of his biological father's royal guards, and, through use of his telepathic power, an eagle, a panther and two ferrets. Along the way, he falls in love with the slave girl, Kiri.

Crew

Virginia Aalko

Visual Effects

Linda Lou Agnelli

Props

John Alcott

Director Of Photography

Conrad E Angone

Production Designer

Victor Anselmo

Other

Nader Atassi

Executive Producer

Lester Berman

Assistant Director

Lester Berman

Production Manager

Donald P Borchers

Associate Producer

Steve Boyum

Stunt Coordinator

Hank Calia

Stunts

Tara Candoli

Makeup

Michael Cheselka

Production Assistant

Alf Clausen

Original Music

Paul Clay

Sound Effects

Beth Conwell

Production Assistant

Erik Cord

Stunts

Don Coscarelli

Screenplay

Bill Cruse

Photography

Kerrie Cullen

Stunts

David Decarlo

On-Set Dresser

Frank Demarco

Special Effects

Phillip Dennis

Costumes

Jim Dodson

Production Assistant

David Ellis

Stunts

Gary Epper

Stunts

Jeannie Epper

Stunts

Carl Richard Fontana

Visual Effects

David Franco

Music Supervisor

William G Gage

Animal Trainer

Roger George

Special Effects

Chuck Gordon

Production Assistant

Richard Graves

Assistant Director

Norman Griffin

Graphics

Thomas M. Hammel

Unit Production Manager

Helene Harris

Production Coordinator

Bill Hart

Stunts

Mary Hermann

On-Set Dresser

Jeremy Hoenack

Sound Effects

Lee Holdridge

Music

Lee Holdridge

Original Music

Stephen A Hope

Music Editor

David J Hudson

Sound

Frank K. Isaac

Associate Producer

Gary Jensen

Stunts

Gary Johnson

Stunts

Al Jones

Stunts

Michael F Jones

Visual Effects

Joel King

Camera Operator

Nikita Knatz

Consultant

Nikita Knatz

Visual Effects

Steve Lavapies

Production Assistant

Louis Lazzara

Makeup

Fred M. Lerner

Stunts

Betty Pecha Madden

Costumes

William Manns

Special Makeup Effects

Sergio Marcotulli

Sound

Michael H Mcgaughy

Stunts

David J Mcmillan

Animal Trainer

Greig Mcritchie

Original Music

John C. Meier

Stunts

Mel Metcalfe

Sound

David B Miller

Special Makeup Effects

Bob Minor

Stunts

Michael Minor

Consultant

Greg Moonyham

Stunts

Deborah Moreland

Set Decorator

Riley Morgan

Props

Boone Naar

Animal Trainer

Donald J Newman

Assistant Director

Lesley Lynn Nicholson

Costumes

Doug O'neons

Camera Operator

Daryn Okada

Steadicam Operator

Daryn Okada

Director Of Photography

Frank Orsatti

Stunts

Paul Pepperman

Producer

Paul Pepperman

Screenplay

Dan Peterson

Location Manager

Chuck Picerni Jr.

Stunts

Jon Pochron

Stunts

Jeryd Pojawa

Visual Effects

Roberto A Quezada

Production Supervisor

Joe Reich

Casting

Bill Reichert

Photography

Bryan Renfro

Animal Trainer

Paul "sled" Reynolds

Animal Trainer

William C Rivers

Wrangler

John Romano

Stunts

Philip Romano

Stunts

R.a. Rondell

Stunts

Jeanne Rosenberg

Script Supervisor

Anthony Santa Croce

Sound

John R Savka

Key Grip

James Sbardellati

Assistant Director

Charles M Stewart

Lead Set Dresser

Sylvio Tabet

Executive Producer

Bob Terhune

Stunts

Allen Terry

Construction

Peter Tothpal

Hair

Buddy Van Horn

Stunts

Steve Vandeman

Stunts

Roy Watts

Editor

Ray West

Sound

George Wilbur

Stunts

Mary Williamson

Costumes

Henry Wills

Stunts

Jerry Wills

Stunts

Joe Woo

Assistant Editor

Film Details

Also Known As
Beastmaster, Dar l'invincible
MPAA Rating
PG
Genre
Adventure
Action
Adaptation
Fantasy
Release Date
1982
Location
Simi Valley, California, USA; Lake Pyramid, California, USA; Valley of Fire State Park, Nevada, USA; Arizona; Simi Valley, California, USA; Valley of Fire State Park, Nevada, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 58m

Articles

The Beastmaster -


"Born with the courage of an eagle, the strength of a black tiger, and the power of a god," read the posters for The Beastmaster (1982), a sword and sorcery fantasy film that appeared the same summer as Arnold Schwarzenegger's blockbuster Conan the Barbarian . The fantasy genre was capitalizing on popularity due in part to the success of the role-playing game Dungeons & Dragons . The game had been around for half a decade when writer/director Don Coscarelli created The Beastmaster with co-screenwriter Paul Pepperman. The original story was based on the 1959 novel The Beast Master by Andre Norton, which concerned a Navajo warrior set in the world of sci-fi. However, when Norton read the screenplay, she was unhappy with the changes the writers had made and had her name removed from the credits. According to Coscarelli, he envisioned the film as "a cross between samurai films and Disney."

High priest Maax (Rip Torn) plans to kill the unborn son of King Zed (Rod Loomis) after witches predict the child will one day grow up to destroy him. When Zed gets wind of the plot, he banishes Maax, but not before one of the witches steals the child, Dar (Marc Singer), from his mother's womb and puts him into that of a cow. The child grows up as the son of a simple villager, but has the ability of a "beastmaster," or one who can communicate with animals through telepathy. When the Jun, a group of barbarians, murder the people of his village, Dar goes on a quest for revenge. Along the way, he meets slave girl Kiri (Tanya Roberts), an eagle named Sharak, two ferrets, Kodo and Podo, and a panther named Ruh. Also in the cast were John Amos, Vanna Bonta, Josh Milrad, and Ralph Strait.

The Beastmaster was made with a budget around $10 million. How the money was raised is in dispute. According to a January 1982 article in Screen International , co-producer Sylvio Tabet said that he and Coscarelli spent two years preparing to make the film, with Tabet having financed it completely on his own with European bank loans and private investments, but Variety claimed in August of that year that the film had been financed by a "consortium of foreign investors" and presales of foreign distribution rights at the 1981 MIFED International Film and Multimedia Market in Milan and the Cannes Film Festival. Officially, Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer and Leisure Investment Company were the production companies, with MGM/UA Entertainment Co. as distributors.

Interiors for The Beastmaster were shot in a former toy warehouse in North Hollywood, with main exteriors and landscapes done on a 3,000 acre lot in Simi Valley, belonging to the Union Oil Company, with additional filming done at Lake Piru, in the Los Padres National Forest, The the Valley of Fire State Park in Nevada, as well as various locations in Arizona. Production lasted from December 1, 1981 to mid-February 1982, with the American Humane Association on hand to supervise the treatment of the animal actors, including twenty ferrets, three grizzly bears, a wedge-tailed eagle and three tigers. Kipling, the tiger who did the majority of acting as Ruh, was dyed black to look like a panther and trained six weeks for his role.

The Beastmaster had been scheduled for a Christmas 1982 release until United Artists acquired the domestic distribution rights and wanted to move the date up to August 20, 1982, when it debuted in Los Angeles and New York. The film was not a hit, only just making back its costs with a $14 million take at the box office. However, The Beastmaster became a staple on cable television in the 1990s. Said TNT programming executive Phil Oppenheim, "It's among our most popular movies. It's in the second tier after Gone With the Wind (1939)." A sequel, Beastmaster 2: Through the Portal of Time with Marc Singer reprising his role, was released in 1991, and Singer played Dar again in a television movie in 1996. Tabet would revisit The Beastmaster once more as a television series on Syfy from 1999 to 2002.

SOURCES:

The AFI Catalog of Feature Films
Browne, David "Why "The Beastmaster"? Entertainment Weekly 1 Sep 93
The Internet Movie Database

By Lorraine LoBianco
The Beastmaster -

The Beastmaster -

"Born with the courage of an eagle, the strength of a black tiger, and the power of a god," read the posters for The Beastmaster (1982), a sword and sorcery fantasy film that appeared the same summer as Arnold Schwarzenegger's blockbuster Conan the Barbarian . The fantasy genre was capitalizing on popularity due in part to the success of the role-playing game Dungeons & Dragons . The game had been around for half a decade when writer/director Don Coscarelli created The Beastmaster with co-screenwriter Paul Pepperman. The original story was based on the 1959 novel The Beast Master by Andre Norton, which concerned a Navajo warrior set in the world of sci-fi. However, when Norton read the screenplay, she was unhappy with the changes the writers had made and had her name removed from the credits. According to Coscarelli, he envisioned the film as "a cross between samurai films and Disney." High priest Maax (Rip Torn) plans to kill the unborn son of King Zed (Rod Loomis) after witches predict the child will one day grow up to destroy him. When Zed gets wind of the plot, he banishes Maax, but not before one of the witches steals the child, Dar (Marc Singer), from his mother's womb and puts him into that of a cow. The child grows up as the son of a simple villager, but has the ability of a "beastmaster," or one who can communicate with animals through telepathy. When the Jun, a group of barbarians, murder the people of his village, Dar goes on a quest for revenge. Along the way, he meets slave girl Kiri (Tanya Roberts), an eagle named Sharak, two ferrets, Kodo and Podo, and a panther named Ruh. Also in the cast were John Amos, Vanna Bonta, Josh Milrad, and Ralph Strait. The Beastmaster was made with a budget around $10 million. How the money was raised is in dispute. According to a January 1982 article in Screen International , co-producer Sylvio Tabet said that he and Coscarelli spent two years preparing to make the film, with Tabet having financed it completely on his own with European bank loans and private investments, but Variety claimed in August of that year that the film had been financed by a "consortium of foreign investors" and presales of foreign distribution rights at the 1981 MIFED International Film and Multimedia Market in Milan and the Cannes Film Festival. Officially, Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer and Leisure Investment Company were the production companies, with MGM/UA Entertainment Co. as distributors. Interiors for The Beastmaster were shot in a former toy warehouse in North Hollywood, with main exteriors and landscapes done on a 3,000 acre lot in Simi Valley, belonging to the Union Oil Company, with additional filming done at Lake Piru, in the Los Padres National Forest, The the Valley of Fire State Park in Nevada, as well as various locations in Arizona. Production lasted from December 1, 1981 to mid-February 1982, with the American Humane Association on hand to supervise the treatment of the animal actors, including twenty ferrets, three grizzly bears, a wedge-tailed eagle and three tigers. Kipling, the tiger who did the majority of acting as Ruh, was dyed black to look like a panther and trained six weeks for his role. The Beastmaster had been scheduled for a Christmas 1982 release until United Artists acquired the domestic distribution rights and wanted to move the date up to August 20, 1982, when it debuted in Los Angeles and New York. The film was not a hit, only just making back its costs with a $14 million take at the box office. However, The Beastmaster became a staple on cable television in the 1990s. Said TNT programming executive Phil Oppenheim, "It's among our most popular movies. It's in the second tier after Gone With the Wind (1939)." A sequel, Beastmaster 2: Through the Portal of Time with Marc Singer reprising his role, was released in 1991, and Singer played Dar again in a television movie in 1996. Tabet would revisit The Beastmaster once more as a television series on Syfy from 1999 to 2002. SOURCES: The AFI Catalog of Feature Films Browne, David "Why "The Beastmaster"? Entertainment Weekly 1 Sep 93 The Internet Movie Database By Lorraine LoBianco

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States August 20, 1982

Based on the novel "The Beast Master," written by Andre Norton and published by Harcourt, Brace in 1959.

Released in United States August 20, 1982