Arthur Lubin


Director

About

Birth Place
Los Angeles, California, USA
Born
July 25, 1898
Died
May 12, 1995
Cause of Death
Stroke

Biography

Best known as the creator of the sitcom "Mister Ed," Arthur Lubin grew up near the hub of the burgeoning film medium. He first broke into the industry as an actor in silent films in 1924. He appeared in films over the next five years before making the leap to director in 1934 with "A Successful Failure." Then, he created his own film and music studio, Lubin Studios, and steadily built hi...

Family & Companions

Helen Lubin
Wife
Frank Burford
Companion

Notes

"I never considered myself a great director. I consider myself a good director, a director that produces because I am not temperamental. I do not have fits of anger and tear my hair. I get along well with actors and the production department." --Arthur Lubin in an oral history at the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences' Margaret Herrick Library, quoted in "Behind the Screen: How Gays and Lesbians Shaped Hollywood 1910-1969" by William J. Mann.

Biography

Best known as the creator of the sitcom "Mister Ed," Arthur Lubin grew up near the hub of the burgeoning film medium. He first broke into the industry as an actor in silent films in 1924. He appeared in films over the next five years before making the leap to director in 1934 with "A Successful Failure." Then, he created his own film and music studio, Lubin Studios, and steadily built his reputation as a director. By the '40s, he was directing a number of Abbott and Costello comedy movies including, "Buck Privates," "In the Navy," and "Hold That Ghost." In 1943, he directed his biggest box office success, the horror classic, "Phantom of the Opera." In the '50s, Lubin directed a number of films featuring "Francis the Talking Mule." He brought the concept to television in 1958 with the show about a talking horse named "Mister Ed." After the series' successful eight-year run, Lubin continued working in television until he retired in 1981. He lived out the rest of his days with his life partner, Frank Burford. Lubin died age 96.

Filmography

 

Director (Feature Film)

Rain for a Dusty Summer (1972)
Director
Hold On! (1966)
Director
The Incredible Mr. Limpet (1964)
Director
The Thief of Baghdad (1961)
Director
Escapade in Japan (1957)
Director
The First Traveling Saleslady (1956)
Director
Star of India (1956)
Director
Lady Godiva of Coventry (1955)
Director
Francis in the Navy (1955)
Director
Footsteps in the Fog (1955)
Director
Francis Joins the WACS (1954)
Director
South Sea Woman (1953)
Director
Francis Covers the Big Town (1953)
Director
It Grows on Trees (1952)
Director
Francis Goes to West Point (1952)
Director
Queen for a Day (1951)
Director
Francis Goes to the Races (1951)
Director
Rhubarb (1951)
Director
Francis (1950)
Director
Impact (1949)
Director
New Orleans (1947)
Director
A Night in Paradise (1946)
Director
The Spider Woman Strikes Back (1946)
Director
Delightfully Dangerous (1945)
Director
Ali Baba and the Forty Thieves (1944)
Director
White Savage (1943)
Director
Phantom of the Opera (1943)
Director
Eagle Squadron (1942)
Director
Ride 'Em Cowboy (1942)
Director
Where Did You Get That Girl? (1941)
Director
Hold That Ghost (1941)
Director
In the Navy (1941)
Director
Keep 'Em Flying (1941)
Director
San Francisco Docks (1941)
Director
Buck Privates (1941)
Director
Black Friday (1940)
Director
I'm Nobody's Sweetheart Now (1940)
Director
Gangs of Chicago (1940)
Director
Meet the Wildcat (1940)
Director
Who Killed Aunt Maggie? (1940)
Director
The Big Guy (1939)
Director
Risky Business (1939)
Director
Call a Messenger (1939)
Director
Big Town Czar (1939)
Director
Mickey, the Kid (1939)
Director
Secrets of a Nurse (1938)
Director
Prison Break (1938)
Director
Midnight Intruder (1938)
Director
The Beloved Brat (1938)
Director
Newsboys' Home (1938)
Director of retakes
California Straight Ahead (1937)
Director
Idol of the Crowds (1937)
Director
Adventure's End (1937)
Director
I Cover the War (1937)
Director
Mysterious Crossing (1936)
Director
Yellowstone (1936)
Director
The House of a Thousand Candles (1936)
Director
Great God Gold (1935)
Director
Frisco Waterfront (1935)
Director
Two Sinners (1935)
Director
Honeymoon, Limited (1935)
Director
Successful Failure (1934)
Director

Cast (Feature Film)

Times Square (1929)
Russ Glover/Benjamin Lederwitski
Eyes of the Underworld (1929)
Gang leader
The Bushranger (1928)
Arthur
Afraid To Love (1927)
Rafael
Bardelys the Magnificent (1926)
King Louis XIII
Millionaires (1926)
Lew
His People (1925)
Morris Cominsky [grown]
The Woman on the Jury (1924)

Producer (Feature Film)

Escapade in Japan (1957)
Producer
The First Traveling Saleslady (1956)
Producer

Misc. Crew (Feature Film)

Crimes And Misdemeanors (1989)
Other
Terror in the Aisles (1984)
Other

Director (Special)

Arthur the Kid (1981)
Director
If I'm Lost, How Come I Found You? (1978)
Director
Little Lulu (1978)
Director

Life Events

Videos

Movie Clip

New Orleans (1947) — (Movie Clip) — (Do You Know What It Means To Miss) New Orleans Not a little bit mind-bending, Billie Holiday is well composed as an actress, playing the maid Endie, with Dorothy Patrick the enthused daughter of her employer, before her first song in her only movie, a standard by Louis Alter and Eddie DeLange, with Louis Armstrong her boyfriend in the band, in the independent jazz showcase from producers Herbert Biberman and Jules Levey, New Orleans, 1947.
Impact (1949) - Need A Hand? Steep acceleration here from nebulous ill-intent to vicious (though incompetent) murder attempt, fake brother-in-law Jim (Tony Barrett) contrived the flat tire en route from Sausalito to San Rafael (presumably via US-101, which looks a lot different today), in league with the wife (Irene) of auto exec Walt (Brian Donlevy), who gets victimized, leading to all kinds of trouble, in Impact, 1949.
Impact (1949) - Her Favorite Nephew Location shooting in Sausalito, CA, Tony Barrett as Jim (but going by “Jack”), involved in maybe-suspicious activities with Irene (Helen Walker), the wife of auto executive Walt (Brian Donlevy), who had driven from San Francisco planning to meet her, taking her bait-and-switch in stride, in the adventurous Noir Impact, 1949.
Impact (1949) - Buy Your Little Factories Dictionary opening from director Arthur Lubin, then Brian Donlevy as California auto executive Walt, whom one would not want to mess with, confronting his board (led by Clarence Kolb as Darcy) then gone soft on the phone with his wife (Helen Walker), in Impact, 1949.
Hold On! (1966) - Title Song Straightforward as it can be, the title song from Herman’s Hermits of Manchester, with Peter Noone fronting, backed up by legit-musician members Karl Green, Keith Hopwood, Barry Whitwam and Derek “Lek” Leckenby, the song by P.F. Sloan, opening MGM’s Hold On!, 1966.
Hold On! (1966) - That Was Herman! Clever-ish bit in which manager Dudley (Bernard Fox) helps the Herman’s Hermits, about to invade the U.S.A, escape the English girl-mob by dressing as cops, then front man Peter Noone (called “Herman” in the picture) does a little acting, early in MGM’s Hold On!, 1966.
Hold On! (1966) - Make Me Happy Lonesome while touring now in California, English Peter Noone (lead singer of Herman’s Hermits, called “Herman” in the movie) observes Shelley Fabares as a beach chanteuse, her song by Fred Karger, Sid Wayne and Ben Weisman, with Bernard Fox his manager, with some credit due for creativity, in MGM’s Hold On!, 1966.
Hold On! (1966) - I'm Leaning On The Lamp Post The most far-out staging in the picture, this time for another charting song (by Noel Gay, which reached #9 on Billboard in May of that year), Peter Noone leads Herman’s Hermits in space, Bernard Fox their manager, in Hold On!, 1966.
Buck Privates (1941) - Drafty? Bud Abbott and Lou Costello (as "Slicker" and "Herbie") are introduced, and we find out how they wind up in the army, in this early scene from their mega-hit debut as stars, Buck Privates, 1941.
Buck Privates (1941) - Paying On Account A quick insert, from special material written for the stars by John Grant, Slicker (Bud Abbott) and Herbie (Lou Costello) argue over money at the canteen, in Buck Privates, 1941.
Buck Privates (1941) - Boogie Woogie Bugle Boy Private Herbie (Lou Costello) needs a moment before his boxing match so "The Andrews Sisters" appear to introduce their smash "Boogie Woogie Bugle Boy" by Don Raye and Hugh Prince, in the first big Abbott & Costello box office hit, Buck Privates, 1941.
Buck Privates (1941) - Get Your Chins Up! Famous scene said to have been tough to film because the director kept cracking up, Slicker (Bud Abbott) and Herbie (Lou Costello) in the Army drill routine from Buck Privates, 1941.

Trailer

Family

William Lubovsky
Father
Peddler. Polish; emigrated to USA in 1889 and changed surname to Lubin.

Companions

Helen Lubin
Wife
Frank Burford
Companion

Bibliography

Notes

"I never considered myself a great director. I consider myself a good director, a director that produces because I am not temperamental. I do not have fits of anger and tear my hair. I get along well with actors and the production department." --Arthur Lubin in an oral history at the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences' Margaret Herrick Library, quoted in "Behind the Screen: How Gays and Lesbians Shaped Hollywood 1910-1969" by William J. Mann.