Crimes And Misdemeanors


1h 44m 1989

Brief Synopsis

In parallel stories, a wealthy doctor deals with a blackmailing mistress while a filmmaker shoots a documentary about a corrupt TV producer.

Film Details

Also Known As
Crimes et delits, Små och stora brott, Verbrechen und Andere Kleinigkeiten
MPAA Rating
Genre
Comedy
Romance
Drama
Crime
Release Date
1989
Distribution Company
METRO-GOLDWYN-MAYER STUDIOS INC. (MGM )
Location
New York City, New York, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 44m

Synopsis

Contemporary drama comedy set in New York revolving around the guilt people suffer over moral decisions they must make during the course of their lives.

Crew

Joseph S Alfieri

Carpenter

Woody Allen

Screenplay

Rafael Angulo

Song

Gary Antell

Song Performer

Jeanne Atkin

Apprentice

Johann Sebastian Bach

Music

Irving Berlin

Song

Ben Bernie & Orchestra

Song

Susan Bode

Set Decorator

Nacio Herb Brown

Song

Fern Buchner

Makeup

Johnny Burke

Song

Ronald J. Burke

Dolly Grip

Michael Caracciolo

Assistant Camera Operator

Jerry Caron

Production Assistant

Kenneth Casey

Song

Irving Ceasar

Song

Kay Chapin

Script Supervisor

Bill Christians

Wardrobe Supervisor

Anthony Cortino

Hair

Noel Coward

Song

Xavier Cugat

Song

Guy D'hardelot

Song

Gene De Paul

Song

Michael Decasper

Production Assistant

Lee Dichter

Sound

Vernon Duke

Song

Patricia Eiben

Wardrobe Supervisor

Edward Eliscu

Song

William K Everson

Thanks

Sammy Fain

Song

David Favenport

Production Assistant

Ted Fetter

Song

Jonathan Filley

Location Manager

Judie Fixler

Casting

Arthur Freed

Song

Lauren Gibson

Costumes

Haven Gillespie

Song

Anthony Gorruso

Song Performer

Frank Graziadei

Sound

Michael Green

Camera Assistant

Romaine Greene

Hair

Robert Greenhut

Producer

Vincent Guarriello

Grip

Mayor Halley Jr.

Song Performer

Brian Hamill

Photography

Otto A Harbach

Song Performer

Lorenz Hart

Song

Joseph R Hartwick

Production Manager

Ben Hayeem

Thanks

Robert Hein

Sound Editor

Barbara Heller

Location Scout

Mildred Hill

Song

Patty Hill

Song

Alfred Hitchcock

Other

Speed Hopkins

Art Director

Robert Huberman

Dga Trainee

Betty Hutton

Song Performer

Michael A. Jackman

Accounting Assistant

Charles H. Joffe

Executive Producer

Amy Leigh Johnson

Assistant

Irving Kahal

Song

R Wolfe Kahn

Song

Wayne King

Song

Mark Kivolsi

Assistant Editor

Frances Kolar

Makeup

Lori Kornspun

Sound Editor

Victoria Kress

Casting Associate

William Kruzykowski

Assistant Editor

Jeffrey Kurland

Costume Designer

John Latouche

Song

Bernie Leighton

Song Performer

Walter Lenvisky

Song Performer

Ellen Lewis

Casting Associate

Liberace

Song Performer

Linda Lilienfeld

Film Research

Glenn Lloyd

Art Department Coordinator

Frank Loesser

Song

Peter Lombardi

Production Auditor

Santo Loquasto

Production Designer

Arthur Lubin

Other

Edward Ludwig

Other

Joe Malin

Music Coordinator

Howard Mandelbaum

Thanks

George Masso

Song Performer

Jim Mazione

Best Boy

James Mazzola

Property Master

Anne Mccabe

Apprentice

Harold Mcevoy

Transportation Captain

Jimmy Mchugh

Song

Kati Meister

Film Research

Joseph Meyer

Song

Gary Allen Meyers

Song Performer

Charles Miles

Song Performer

Dick Mingalone

Camera Operator

Yael Morris

Art Department

Nancy Morris-gunkeleman

Other

Susan E Morse

Editor

Lee Musiker

Song Performer

Chris Noor

Camera Trainee

Sven Nykvist

Dp/Cinematographer

Sven Nykvist

Director Of Photography

Anne Caldwell O'dea

Song

Richard Patrick

Assistant Director

Ron Pentagna

Construction Coordinator

Elise Pettus

Production Assistant

Maceo Pinkard

Song

Cole Porter

Song

Jacques Press

Song

Ray Quinlan

Gaffer

Don Raye

Song

Thomas Reilly

Assistant Director

Thomas Reilly

Associate Producer

Dana Robin

Location Scout

Helen Robin

Associate Producer

Helen Robin

Production Coordinator

Richard Rodgers

Song

Jack Rollins

Executive Producer

William Rose

Song

Laura Rosenthal

Casting Associate

Hilton Ruiz

Song

James Sabat

Sound Mixer

Louis Sabat

Boom Operator

Scott Schaffer

Craft Service

Franz Schubert

Music

Doug Shannon

Production Assistant

Shari Shertok

Film Research

Derek Smith

Song Performer

Jay Smith

Production Assistant

Cosmo Sorice

Scenic Artist

James Sorice

Scenic Artist

Tony Sotos

Song Performer

Pete Tavis

Transportation Co-Captain

Juliet Taylor

Casting

Tony Tedeasco

Song Performer

Edward Teschmacher

Song

Carl Turnquest

Projectionist

Frank Tuttle

Other

Warren Vache

Song Performer

Egbert Van Alystyne

Song

James Van Heusen

Song

Bob Ward

Key Grip

Edward Ward

Sound

Dave Weinman

On-Set Dresser

Gilbert S Williams

Production Assistant

Jack Wiseman

Song

Vincent Youmans

Song

Victor Young

Song

Donna Zakowska

Assistant

Film Details

Also Known As
Crimes et delits, Små och stora brott, Verbrechen und Andere Kleinigkeiten
MPAA Rating
Genre
Comedy
Romance
Drama
Crime
Release Date
1989
Distribution Company
METRO-GOLDWYN-MAYER STUDIOS INC. (MGM )
Location
New York City, New York, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 44m

Award Nominations

Best Director

1989
Woody Allen

Best Original Screenplay

1989

Best Supporting Actor

1989
Martin Landau

Articles

Crimes And Misdemeanors


Most of us would not typically choose to work on our vacations, but Woody Allen can hardly be called typical. Leaving one screenplay barely begun, Woody left for a tour of Europe in the summer of 1988. It wasn't long before another script idea popped into his head. Rather than abandon the earlier idea, Woody decided to combine the two scripts into one and began scribbling a new screenplay on the stationery of the various hotels at which he stayed. The collection of drafts imprinted with the logos of Stockholm's Grand Hotel, the Villa d'Este on Lake Como, the Gritti Palace in Venice and Claridge's in London became the basis for one of Woody's most popular and critically acclaimed movies.

Crimes and Misdemeanors (1989) tells a dark and dramatic story balanced by a slighter comic one that reinforces the main tale's ideas. Martin Landau (Tucker [1988], Ed Wood [1994]) is Judah Rosenthal, a married ophthalmologist having an affair with a flight attendant (Anjelica Huston). When she threatens to expose him if he doesn't marry her, Judah becomes desperate and turns to his brother Jack (Jerry Orbach) for help. Jack proposes to make Judah's problem go away by making his mistress go away, permanently. This easy but horrifying answer to his problems leads Judah to remember his religious upbringing. His father had told him that the eyes of God were always upon him. If Judah is party to such a great crime, what will God's answer be?

In the accompanying story, Cliff Stern (Woody Allen) is a low-budget documentary filmmaker who despises Lester (Alan Alda), his shallow but successful brother-in-law. The latter offers him the chance of a lifetime: to helm a big-budget documentary about Lester's wonderful life. Will Cliff sell out even if it gives him the power to finish his more important work or will he stay pure though a honorable failure?

As Woody later explained, "Crimes And Misdemeanors is about people who don't see. They don't see themselves as others see them. They don't see the right and wrong situations. And that was a strong metaphor in the movie."

Crimes and Misdemeanors went through more changes than any other Woody Allen movie. A variety of titles were proposed and rejected including "Brothers," dropped because of a similarly-titled television show and "High Crimes And Misdemeanors" which Woody thought sounded too much like Gilbert and Sullivan. After shooting, Woody found that major subplots didn't work and brought the cast and crew back for ten days of re-shooting. Lost were an entire section with Mia Farrow as a married social worker in an old age home (she became a television producer in the final film) and a scene at the end where Cliff is caught behind a curtain with an aspiring actress played by Sean Young.

The extra effort paid off both at the box office and in the critics' reviews. Crimes and Misdemeanors made $19.6 million dollars in the U.S., more than any Woody Allen movie after 1986's Hannah and Her Sisters. The film received three Academy Award nominations, two to Woody for Best Director and Best Original Screenplay and one to Martin Landau for Best Supporting Actor. Alan Alda won the Best Supporting Actor award from both the National Board of Review and the New York Film Critics Circle and Woody won the Writers Guild of America award for Best Screenplay Written Directly For The Screen.

The accolades didn't impress Woody, however. Asked how he felt about the praise heaped upon this film he responded, "When I put out a film that enjoys any acceptance that isn't the most mild or grudging, I immediately become suspicious of it. A certain amount of positive response makes me feel comfortable and proud. Then beyond that, I start to feel convinced that a work of any real finesse and subtlety and depth couldn't be as popular as it is." Told that a party of Hollywood celebrities had a private screening of Crimes and Misdemeanors and raved about it, Woody responded "I know I must be doing something wrong if my film is being viewed in some Hollywood character's screening room and a group of people there are saying, 'It's his best film,' when many of the things I attack are what they stand for."

Producer: Robert Greenhut
Director: Woody Allen
Screenplay: Woody Allen
Production Design: Santo Loquasto
Cinematography: Sven Nykvist
Costume Design: Jeffrey Kurland
Film Editing: Susan E. Morse
Art Direction: Speed Hopkins
Principal Cast: Martin Landau (Judah Rosenthal), Woody Allen (Cliff Stern), Mia Farrow (Halley Reed), Alan Alda (Lester), Anjelica Huston (Dolores Paley), Claire Bloom (Miriam Rosenthal), Joanna Gleason (Wendy Stern), Sam Waterston (Ben), Jerry Orbach (Jack Rosenthal).
C-104m. Letterboxed.

by Brian Cady
Crimes And Misdemeanors

Crimes And Misdemeanors

Most of us would not typically choose to work on our vacations, but Woody Allen can hardly be called typical. Leaving one screenplay barely begun, Woody left for a tour of Europe in the summer of 1988. It wasn't long before another script idea popped into his head. Rather than abandon the earlier idea, Woody decided to combine the two scripts into one and began scribbling a new screenplay on the stationery of the various hotels at which he stayed. The collection of drafts imprinted with the logos of Stockholm's Grand Hotel, the Villa d'Este on Lake Como, the Gritti Palace in Venice and Claridge's in London became the basis for one of Woody's most popular and critically acclaimed movies. Crimes and Misdemeanors (1989) tells a dark and dramatic story balanced by a slighter comic one that reinforces the main tale's ideas. Martin Landau (Tucker [1988], Ed Wood [1994]) is Judah Rosenthal, a married ophthalmologist having an affair with a flight attendant (Anjelica Huston). When she threatens to expose him if he doesn't marry her, Judah becomes desperate and turns to his brother Jack (Jerry Orbach) for help. Jack proposes to make Judah's problem go away by making his mistress go away, permanently. This easy but horrifying answer to his problems leads Judah to remember his religious upbringing. His father had told him that the eyes of God were always upon him. If Judah is party to such a great crime, what will God's answer be? In the accompanying story, Cliff Stern (Woody Allen) is a low-budget documentary filmmaker who despises Lester (Alan Alda), his shallow but successful brother-in-law. The latter offers him the chance of a lifetime: to helm a big-budget documentary about Lester's wonderful life. Will Cliff sell out even if it gives him the power to finish his more important work or will he stay pure though a honorable failure? As Woody later explained, "Crimes And Misdemeanors is about people who don't see. They don't see themselves as others see them. They don't see the right and wrong situations. And that was a strong metaphor in the movie." Crimes and Misdemeanors went through more changes than any other Woody Allen movie. A variety of titles were proposed and rejected including "Brothers," dropped because of a similarly-titled television show and "High Crimes And Misdemeanors" which Woody thought sounded too much like Gilbert and Sullivan. After shooting, Woody found that major subplots didn't work and brought the cast and crew back for ten days of re-shooting. Lost were an entire section with Mia Farrow as a married social worker in an old age home (she became a television producer in the final film) and a scene at the end where Cliff is caught behind a curtain with an aspiring actress played by Sean Young. The extra effort paid off both at the box office and in the critics' reviews. Crimes and Misdemeanors made $19.6 million dollars in the U.S., more than any Woody Allen movie after 1986's Hannah and Her Sisters. The film received three Academy Award nominations, two to Woody for Best Director and Best Original Screenplay and one to Martin Landau for Best Supporting Actor. Alan Alda won the Best Supporting Actor award from both the National Board of Review and the New York Film Critics Circle and Woody won the Writers Guild of America award for Best Screenplay Written Directly For The Screen. The accolades didn't impress Woody, however. Asked how he felt about the praise heaped upon this film he responded, "When I put out a film that enjoys any acceptance that isn't the most mild or grudging, I immediately become suspicious of it. A certain amount of positive response makes me feel comfortable and proud. Then beyond that, I start to feel convinced that a work of any real finesse and subtlety and depth couldn't be as popular as it is." Told that a party of Hollywood celebrities had a private screening of Crimes and Misdemeanors and raved about it, Woody responded "I know I must be doing something wrong if my film is being viewed in some Hollywood character's screening room and a group of people there are saying, 'It's his best film,' when many of the things I attack are what they stand for." Producer: Robert Greenhut Director: Woody Allen Screenplay: Woody Allen Production Design: Santo Loquasto Cinematography: Sven Nykvist Costume Design: Jeffrey Kurland Film Editing: Susan E. Morse Art Direction: Speed Hopkins Principal Cast: Martin Landau (Judah Rosenthal), Woody Allen (Cliff Stern), Mia Farrow (Halley Reed), Alan Alda (Lester), Anjelica Huston (Dolores Paley), Claire Bloom (Miriam Rosenthal), Joanna Gleason (Wendy Stern), Sam Waterston (Ben), Jerry Orbach (Jack Rosenthal). C-104m. Letterboxed. by Brian Cady

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States Winter December 13, 1989

Released in United States on Video May 24, 1990

Released in United States February 1990

Shown at Berlin Film Festival (in competition) February 9-20, 1990.

Began shooting October 3, 1988.

Released in United States October 13, 1989

Released in United States Winter December 13, 1989

Released in United States on Video May 24, 1990

Released in United States February 1990 (Shown at Berlin Film Festival (in competition) February 9-20, 1990.)

Released in United States October 13, 1989