So's Your Uncle


1h 4m 1943

Film Details

Also Known As
Let Yourself Go
Release Date
Dec 3, 1943
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Universal Pictures Company, Inc.
Distribution Company
Universal Pictures Company, Inc.
Country
United States

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 4m
Film Length
5,731ft (7 reels)

Synopsis

Playwright and actor Steve Curtis rushes out of the theater where he is trying to mount a production to avoid a creditor, only to be hit by the limousine of beautiful Patricia Williams. Against the advice of her escort, Roger Bright, Patricia insists on taking the injured "middle-aged" man home for medical treatment, unaware that the youthful Steve is wearing character makeup. Soon after his arrival at Patricia's home, Steve, still disguised as an older man, attracts the romantic attentions of her wealthy aunt Minerva. Steve quickly finds himself in a quandary, as he has fallen in love with Patricia, but wants Minerva's money to finance his play. To solve his predicament, he poses as his Uncle John and woos Minerva, while at the same time courting Patricia as himself. In due time, he finds himself engaged to both ladies, with Minerva planning a double wedding. At their engagement party, the jealous Roger attempts to expose Steve's dual roles, but is foiled when Steve's real uncle John arrives and turns out to be physically identical to his nephew's disguise. Steve confesses all to his tycoon uncle, and Minerva then convinces the real Uncle John that the double wedding is still a great idea.

Film Details

Also Known As
Let Yourself Go
Release Date
Dec 3, 1943
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Universal Pictures Company, Inc.
Distribution Company
Universal Pictures Company, Inc.
Country
United States

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 4m
Film Length
5,731ft (7 reels)

Quotes

Trivia

Notes

The working title of this film was Let Yourself Go. Hollywood Citizen-News reported in May 1947 that a plagiarism suit concerning this film was successfully filed against Universal and writer Clyde Bruckman by the Harold Lloyd Corp. According to the article, the San Francisco Ninth United States Court of Appeals upheld a $40,000 judgment against Universal, finding that fifty-seven scenes were lifted for this film from the 1931 Lloyd feature Movie Crazy (see AFI Catalog of Feature Films; 1931-40; F3.2978). The court stated that the plagiarism was a deliberate action, as Bruckman had been both the director and a writer on the Lloyd film. According to a December 1947 Hollywood Reporter news item, Walter J. Wise filed a second plagiarism suit against Universal and writer Leonard Lee, claiming that this film was based on his original story "The Young Lady with Gray Hair." That suit, filed in Los Angeles in December 1947, sought $30,000 for use of the story as well as $20,000 in punitive damages for benefits lost that "might have been derived through screen credit and trade paper advertising." The final disposition of this case is not known.