Clyde Bruckman


Director

About

Birth Place
Illinois, USA
Born
September 30, 1894
Died
January 04, 1955
Cause of Death
Suicide

Biography

Began his career as a staff writer at Warner Bros. and went on to collaborate frequently with Buster Keaton, supplying storylines and screenplays and, with "The General" (1927), co-direction. Bruckman subsequently made several shorts and features under his own steam, but the quality of his work declined from the mid-1930s....

Biography

Began his career as a staff writer at Warner Bros. and went on to collaborate frequently with Buster Keaton, supplying storylines and screenplays and, with "The General" (1927), co-direction. Bruckman subsequently made several shorts and features under his own steam, but the quality of his work declined from the mid-1930s.

Filmography

 

Director (Feature Film)

The Man on the Flying Trapeze (1935)
Director
Spring Tonic (1935)
Director
Movie Crazy (1932)
Director
Everything's Rosie (1931)
Director
Feet First (1930)
Director
Welcome Danger (1929)
Director
A Perfect Gentleman (1928)
Director
The General (1927)
Director
Horse Shoes (1927)
Director
Should Tall Men Marry? (1927)
Director

Writer (Feature Film)

The Bachelor (1999)
From Story
Stop! Look! and Laugh! (1960)
Wrt of various segments
Her Lucky Night (1945)
Screenwriter
Under Western Skies (1945)
Screenwriter
She Gets Her Man (1945)
Original Screenplay
Swingtime Johnny (1944)
Screenwriter
South of Dixie (1944)
Screenwriter
Moon Over Las Vegas (1944)
Screenwriter
Twilight on the Prairie (1944)
Screenwriter
Week-End Pass (1944)
Screenwriter
In Society (1944)
Addl comedy seq
So's Your Uncle (1943)
Screenwriter
Honeymoon Lodge (1943)
Screenwriter
Blondie Goes to College (1942)
Story
Professor Beware (1938)
Adaptation
She Learned About Sailors (1934)
Contract Writer
Movie Crazy (1932)
Cont
Welcome Danger (1929)
Story
The Cameraman (1928)
Story
The General (1927)
Writer
For Heaven's Sake (1926)
Story
Seven Chances (1925)
Scen
Keep Smiling (1925)
Story
The Navigator (1924)
Story
Sherlock, Jr. (1924)
Story
The Navigator (1924)
Art titles
Three Ages (1923)
Story
Our Hospitality (1923)
Art titles
Three Ages (1923)
Art titles
Our Hospitality (1923)
Scen
Our Hospitality (1923)
Story
Rouged Lips (1923)
Titles

Director (Short)

Too Many Highballs (1933)
Director
The Finishing Touch (1928)
Director
Putting Pants on Phillip (1927)
Director

Life Events

1919

Screenwriting debut "Three in a Closet"

1921

Title writer for Monty Banks/Bull Montana comedies

1926

Directorial debut, "The General"

Videos

Movie Clip

General, The (1927) - Fort Sumter Has Been Fired Upon! From the top, Buster Keaton introduces himself, as Civil War-era Georgia engineer Johnnie, his beloved train and his girlfriend Annabelle (Marion Mack), then her father (Charles Smith) and fervent brother (Frank Barnes), in a historic moment, in The General, 1927.
General, The (1927) - Cannon Engineer Johnnie (director and star Buster Keaton) has hijacked a cannon, which gives him problems, as he chases the Yankees who've stolen his locomotive, in The General, 1927.
General, The (1927) - Nothing On Earth Can Stop Us Stuck behind Union lines having recklessly pursued his girlfriend (Marion Mack) and the stolen train on which she rode, engineer Johnnie (un-credited writer, director and star Buster Keaton) learns of the enemy’s alarming plans, in The General, 1927.
General, The (1927) - Big Shanty Johnnie (director and star Buster Keaton) gets his train stolen by Yankee spies, his ex-girl Annabelle (Marion Mack) aboard, and gives chase, in Keaton's 1927 masterpiece The General.
Sherlock Jr. (1924) - Shadow Your Man Closely Rejected as a thief by the father of now-dejected "Girl" (Kathryn McGuire), the hero (director and star Buster Keaton) follows his mail-order detective's handbook and his suspect (Ward Crane, who in fact framed him) in Sherlock Jr., 1924.
Sherlock Jr. (1924) - Be Careful! Still immersed in his movie-based dream, the projectionist/hero (director Buster Keaton, as the title character) stays calm under pressure as he flees villains and gets an unexpected assist from his real-life boss and fantasy-assistant (Ford West) in Sherlock Jr., 1924.
Sherlock Jr. (1924) - I Never Thought You'd Make It! Continuing the famous chase sequence, still in the imaginary movie into-which he's dreamed himself, star and director Buster Keaton as the title character is more alone than he realizes, in Sherlock Jr., 1924.
Sherlock Jr. (1924) - Opening, Old Proverb The opening sequence introduces the title character's real-life persona, his boss (Ford West) and "the girl" (Kathryn McGuire), the premise behind the title still to be revealed, in Buster Keaton's action-fantasy-comedy Sherlock Jr., 1924.
Sherlock Jr. (1924) - The Crime-Crushing Criminologist Buster Keaton appears in his second role as the title character, in the movie into which he's dreamed himself, and in which his girl and his rival (Kathryn McGuire, Ward Crane), now appear, in the acclaimed silent comedy Sherlock Jr., 1924.
Sherlock Jr. (1924) - Hearts And Pearls Exhausted and frustrated with his amateur detective efforts, the hero dozes off at work in the projection room and dreams himself into a movie called Hearts And Pearls, executing one of director and star Buster Keaton's more transcendent ideas, in Sherlock Jr., 1924.
Seven Chances (1925) - Would You Marry Me? Pushed by his partner (T. Roy Barnes) to marry by evening in order to claim an inheritance that will save their firm, lawyer Jimmy (Buster Keaton) tries his luck at the country club, in Seven Chances, 1925.
Everything's Rosie (1931) - I Couldn't Swipe A Piano First appearance for Anita Louise, age 16, as the title character, now grown-up Rosie, with Robert Woolsey (working without his comedy partner Bert Wheeler) as carnival snake-oil salesman Droop, ten years after he added her to his act, in RKO’s Everything’s Rosie, 1931.

Bibliography