The Scout


1h 47m 1994

Brief Synopsis

A down-and-out professional baseball scout has a chance to make it back to the top with his latest discovery, a raw, young pitching talent.

Film Details

Also Known As
Scout
MPAA Rating
Release Date
1994
Production Company
Paul Coogan; William B Radcliffe
Distribution Company
20th Century Fox Distribution
Location
Los Angeles, California, USA; Mexico; New York City, New York, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 47m

Synopsis

A down-and-out professional baseball scout has a chance to make it back to the top with his latest discovery, a raw, young pitching talent.

Crew

Randle Akerson

Dialogue Editor

Pamela Alch

Script Supervisor

Michael Alexonis

Grip

Roger Angell

Source Material (From Article)

Billy G Arter

Transportation Coordinator

Alice Baker

On-Set Dresser

Carmen Baker

Assistant Sound Editor

Claudia Becker

Local Casting

Lisa A Becker

Production Coordinator

Bruce Bellamy

On-Set Dresser

Tony Bennett

Other

Andrew Bergman

Screenplay

Nick Bernstein

Location Manager

Thomas Betts

Set Designer

Sharon Bialy

Casting

Matt Bilski

Assistant

Kelly Birrer

Other

Deane Boeka

Rerecording

Deane Boeka

Other

Susan Booker

Casting Associate

Merideth Boswell

Set Decorator

Karl Braun

Location Manager

Jeanne Brennan

Production Coordinator

Ken Brett

Other

J David Brightbill

Dga Trainee

Albert Brooks

Screenplay

Donald Bryant

Camera

Norman Buck

Key Grip

Duncan Burns

Dialogue Editor

Joe Burns

Assistant Director

Gary Burritt

Negative Cutting

Ken Burton

Rerecording

Kathleen Callahan

Assistant

Rick Canelli

Adr

Rosalio Cano

Best Boy

Patrick Capone

Camera Operator

Jeff Carson

Music Editor

Rocio Casar

Other

Andrew Casey

Assistant Camera Operator

Federico Castillo

Wardrobe

Kevin Center

Office Assistant

Robin Citrin

Location Manager

Bill Conti

Music Composer

Craig Conwell

Assistant Editor

Paul Coogan

Cable Operator

Virginia Cook-mcgowan

Sound Editor

Bob Costas

Other

Kurt Courtland

Assistant Sound Editor

Gina B Cranham

Set Designer

Carol Cuddy

Unit Production Manager

Jack Cummins

Executive Producer

Jack Cummins

Unit Production Manager

Mike Daigle

Other

Jerry Deblau

Gaffer

Lee Decarlo

Other

Craig Denault

Camera Operator

Jason Dowdeswell

Technical Supervisor

Phyllis Drury

Other

Edward Dunlop

Casting Associate

Enrique Echeverria

Art Director

Kate Edwards

Wardrobe

John M. Elliott Jr.

Makeup Artist

Roy Firestone

Other

Efren Flores

Production

Sarah Frank

Art Assistant

John Franzone

Technical Advisor

Jenny Fulle

Visual Effects

Sue Gandy

Costumes

Steve Garvey

Other

Suzanne Geiger

Assistant Director

Jack P Glenn

Key Grip

Jorge Gonzalez

Props

Lili Gonzalez

Production Assistant

Mario Rolando Gonzalez

Caterer

Sybil Gray

Costume Supervisor

Javier Gunther

Transportation Coordinator

Michael Gurasich

Assistant Camera Operator

Walt Hadfield

Construction Coordinator

Dan Hall

Sound Editor

Brett Harding

Motion Control

Barbara Harris

Adr Voice Casting

Richard A Harrison

Music Editor

Tim Hassett

Technical Advisor

Craig 'pup' Heath

Other

Stephen Hendrickson

Production Designer

Elsa Hermoso

Production Accountant

Faustino Hernandez

Best Boy Grip

Keith Hernandez

Other

Craig P Herring

Assistant Editor

Pembroke J. Herring

Editor

Phil Hetos

Color Timer

Hilda Hodges

Foley Artist

Julie Inglese

Art Department Coordinator

Peter Iovino

Photography

Sean Jablonski

Assistant Production Coordinator

Sergio Jara

Other

Monica Johnson

Screenplay

Gary Kangrga

Key Grip

Rick Kangrga

Grip

David Kelley

Assistant Director

Tom Kelly

Other

Scott Keppler

Editor

Bill King

Assistant Property Master

Kenny King

Best Boy Grip

R. J. Kizer

Adr Supervisor

Jerry D Knight

Electrician

Kim K Kono

Electrician

Steve Kornacki

Other

Isabelle Kostic-crosby

Assistant Location Manager

Laszlo Kovacs

Other

Laszlo Kovacs

Director Of Photography

Jules Kovisars

Dga Trainee

Neil Krepela

Visual Effects Supervisor

Leland Labarre

Office Assistant

Mary Jo Lang

Foley Mixer

Catt Lebaigue

Foley Editor

Steve Lefkowitz

Technical Advisor

Chris Lisoni

Other

Michael E Listorti

Grip

Hector Lopez

Unit Production Manager

Barbara Lorenz

Hair Stylist

Barbara Lorte

Other

Tom Mack

Associate Producer

Tom Mack

Assistant Director

Donna Maloney

Wardrobe

Bobby Mancuso

Assistant Camera Operator

Debra L. Manwiller

Casting

Richard Marx

Adr Editor

Jonas C. Matz

Medic

John H. Maxwell

On-Set Dresser

Edward Mccarthy

On-Set Dresser

Kevin Mccarthy

Set Decorator

Brian Mceachen

Rigging Gaffer

James M Mcewen

Gaffer

Tim Mcgarver

Other

Gail Mcmullen

Costumes

Kevin Mcneil

Grip

Hwei-chur Meng

Assistant

Charlie Messenger

Extras Agent/Coordinator

Fran Messer

Assistant

Tricia Miles

Other

David Moll

Assistant Property Master

Glenn Moran

Electrician

Jesus Moreno

Other

Andre Morgan

Producer

Julie Ann Moyeda

Accounting Assistant

Ernesto Munoz

Boom Operator

Bobby Murcer

Other

Margo Myers

Accountant

Herb Nanas

Executive Producer

Ralph Nelson

Photography

Ron Newburn

Electrician

Peter Norman

Camera Operator

Thomas J. O'connell

Adr Mixer

Kim Ornitz

Sound Mixer

Donald Ortiz

Assistant Sound Editor

Richard Pagano

Casting

Jonathan Pessin

Assistant

Dane Picard

Technical Supervisor

Richard Portman

Rerecording

Phil Pote

Other

Phillip M Pote

Technical Advisor

Edward Poveda

Production

Larry Preston

Production

Robert A Preston

Dolly Grip

William B Radcliffe

Cable Operator

Liz Radley

Video

Jimmy Raitt

Property Master

Glenn Randall

Stunt Coordinator

Kirk Randazzo

Technical Advisor

Ana Rebuelta

Script Supervisor

Ken Regan

Photography

Luke Reichle

Costume Designer

Mayda Renizzi-holt

Assistant Production Accountant

Renzo Restrepo

Production Assistant

Luz Maria Reyes

Production Assistant

Tim Richards

Technical Supervisor

Felipe Rodriguez

Other

John Roesch

Foley Artist

John Roland

Other

Dave Rosenthal

Rerecording

Dave Rosenthal

Other

Jerry M Ross

Costumes

Scott Rousseau

Props

Albert S. Ruddy

Producer

Mike Russo

Stunt Coordinator

Gail Ryan

Hair Stylist

Ken Ryan

Production Accountant

Michael S Ryan

Dolly Grip

Robert Ryan

Makeup

Jim Rygiel

Digital Effects Supervisor

Bret Saberhagen

Other

Stacy Saravo

Foley Editor

Steve Scanlon

Boom Operator

Bob Schick

Set Production Assistant

William Schuler

Sound Editor

Rosanna Scotto

Other

Lisa K Sessions

Assistant Set Decorator

Michele Sharp

Dialogue Editor

Bob Sheppard

Other

Film Details

Also Known As
Scout
MPAA Rating
Release Date
1994
Production Company
Paul Coogan; William B Radcliffe
Distribution Company
20th Century Fox Distribution
Location
Los Angeles, California, USA; Mexico; New York City, New York, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 47m

Articles

Lane Smith (1936-2005)


Lane Smith, a veteran character actor of stage, screen and television, and who was best known to modern viewers as Perry White on Lois and Clark: The New Adventures of Superman, died on June 13 at his Los Angeles home of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, which is more commonly called Lou Gehrig's disease. He was 69.

Born in Memphis, Tennessee on April 29, 1936, Smith had a desire to act from a very young age. After a brief stint in the Army, he moved to New York to study at the Actors Studio and made his debut on off-Broadway debut in 1959. For the next 20 years, Smith was a staple of the New York stage before sinking his teeth into television: Kojak, The Rockford Files, Dallas; and small parts in big films: Rooster Cogburn (1975), Network (1976).

In 1978, he moved to Los Angeles to focus on better film roles, and his toothy grin and southern drawl found him a niche in backwoods dramas: Resurrection (1980), Honeysuckle Rose (1980); and a prominent role as the feisty Mayor in the dated Cold War political yarn Red Dawn (1984).

Smith returned to New York in 1984 and scored a hit on Broadway when he received a starring role in David Mamet's Glengarry Glen Ross and earned a drama desk award in the process. His breakthrough role for many critics and colleagues was his powerful turn as Richard Nixon in The Final Days (1989); a docudrama based on the book by Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein. He earned a Golden Globe nomination for his spot-on portrayal of the fallen President, and his career picked up from there as parts in prominent Hollywood films came his way: Air America (1990), My Cousin Vinny, The Mighty Ducks (both 1992), and the Pauly Shore comedy Son in Law (1993).

For all his dependable performances over the years, Smith wasn't a familiar presence to millions of viewers until he landed the plump role of Perry White, the editor of the Daily Planet in Superman: Lois and Clark which co-starred Dean Cain and Teri Hatcher (1993-1997). After that run, he gave a scorching performance as Reverend Jeremiah Brown in the teleplay Inherit the Wind (1999); and he appeared last in the miniseries Out of Order (2003). He is survived by his wife Debbie; and son, Rob.

by Michael T. Toole
Lane Smith (1936-2005)

Lane Smith (1936-2005)

Lane Smith, a veteran character actor of stage, screen and television, and who was best known to modern viewers as Perry White on Lois and Clark: The New Adventures of Superman, died on June 13 at his Los Angeles home of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, which is more commonly called Lou Gehrig's disease. He was 69. Born in Memphis, Tennessee on April 29, 1936, Smith had a desire to act from a very young age. After a brief stint in the Army, he moved to New York to study at the Actors Studio and made his debut on off-Broadway debut in 1959. For the next 20 years, Smith was a staple of the New York stage before sinking his teeth into television: Kojak, The Rockford Files, Dallas; and small parts in big films: Rooster Cogburn (1975), Network (1976). In 1978, he moved to Los Angeles to focus on better film roles, and his toothy grin and southern drawl found him a niche in backwoods dramas: Resurrection (1980), Honeysuckle Rose (1980); and a prominent role as the feisty Mayor in the dated Cold War political yarn Red Dawn (1984). Smith returned to New York in 1984 and scored a hit on Broadway when he received a starring role in David Mamet's Glengarry Glen Ross and earned a drama desk award in the process. His breakthrough role for many critics and colleagues was his powerful turn as Richard Nixon in The Final Days (1989); a docudrama based on the book by Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein. He earned a Golden Globe nomination for his spot-on portrayal of the fallen President, and his career picked up from there as parts in prominent Hollywood films came his way: Air America (1990), My Cousin Vinny, The Mighty Ducks (both 1992), and the Pauly Shore comedy Son in Law (1993). For all his dependable performances over the years, Smith wasn't a familiar presence to millions of viewers until he landed the plump role of Perry White, the editor of the Daily Planet in Superman: Lois and Clark which co-starred Dean Cain and Teri Hatcher (1993-1997). After that run, he gave a scorching performance as Reverend Jeremiah Brown in the teleplay Inherit the Wind (1999); and he appeared last in the miniseries Out of Order (2003). He is survived by his wife Debbie; and son, Rob. by Michael T. Toole

TCM Remembers - Michael Ritchie


Director Michael Ritchie died April 16th at the age of 62. A Wisconsin native, Ritchie studied at Harvard before succumbing to the attractions of the theatre. He started working in television during the 1960s where he directed episodes of The Big Valley and The Man from UNCLE among others. He moved into feature films with Downhill Racer (1969) at star Robert Redford's invitation and later directed Redford again in The Candidate (1972). The latter is a classic look at American political life that hasn't lost any of its power or insights over the years. This was the start of Ritchie's most productive period when he made several films that were both popular and critically acclaimed. You can find his sly wit and sense of critical drama in Smile (1975), The Bad News Bears (1976) and Semi-Tough (1978). By the 1980s, though, Ritchie's films focused less on social criticism and more on stars. The Survivors (1983) with Robin Williams remains under-rated but Ritchie-directed vehicles for Eddie Murphy (1986's The Golden Child), Bette Midler (1980's Divine Madness) and Chevy Chase (two Fletch films) didn't quite achieve their potential. Some of the old Ritchie spark and intelligence appeared in the made-for-cable The Positively True Adventures of the Alleged Texas Cheerleader-Murdering Mom (1993) which earned him a Directors Guild Award. One of his final films was the long-awaited screen adaptation of The Fantasticks (1995) which partly brought Ritchie back to his theatrical roots.

ANN SOTHERN: 1909 - 2001
Actress Ann Sothern passed away on March 15th at the age of 89. Her film career spanned sixty years and included a Best Supporting Actress Oscar nomination for The Whales of August (1987) and several Emmy nominations for her roles in the TV shows Private Secretary (1953) and The Ann Sothern Show (1958). Sothern was born as Harriette Lake in North Dakota. She made her first film appearance in 1927 in small roles (so small, in fact, that some sources omit any films before 1929) before deciding to work on Broadway instead. Shortly afterwards she signed with Columbia Pictures where studio head Harry Cohn insisted she change her name because there were already too many actors with the last name of Lake. So "Ann" came from her mother's name Annette and "Sothern" from Shakespearean actor E.H. Sothern. For most of the 1930s she appeared in light comedies working with Eddie Cantor, Maurice Chevalier, Mickey Rooney and Fredric March. However, it wasn't until she switched to MGM (after a brief period with RKO) and made the film Maisie (1939) that Sothern hit pay dirt. It proved enormously popular and led to a series of nine more films through 1947 when she moved into dramas and musicals. During the 50s, Sothern made a mark with her TV series but returned to mostly second tier movies in the 1960s and 1970s. Finally she earned an Oscar nomination for her work in 1987's The Whales of August (in which, incidentally, her daughter Tisha Sterling played her at an earlier age). Turner Classic Movies plans to host a retrospective film tribute to her in July. Check back for details in June.

TCM Remembers - Michael Ritchie

Director Michael Ritchie died April 16th at the age of 62. A Wisconsin native, Ritchie studied at Harvard before succumbing to the attractions of the theatre. He started working in television during the 1960s where he directed episodes of The Big Valley and The Man from UNCLE among others. He moved into feature films with Downhill Racer (1969) at star Robert Redford's invitation and later directed Redford again in The Candidate (1972). The latter is a classic look at American political life that hasn't lost any of its power or insights over the years. This was the start of Ritchie's most productive period when he made several films that were both popular and critically acclaimed. You can find his sly wit and sense of critical drama in Smile (1975), The Bad News Bears (1976) and Semi-Tough (1978). By the 1980s, though, Ritchie's films focused less on social criticism and more on stars. The Survivors (1983) with Robin Williams remains under-rated but Ritchie-directed vehicles for Eddie Murphy (1986's The Golden Child), Bette Midler (1980's Divine Madness) and Chevy Chase (two Fletch films) didn't quite achieve their potential. Some of the old Ritchie spark and intelligence appeared in the made-for-cable The Positively True Adventures of the Alleged Texas Cheerleader-Murdering Mom (1993) which earned him a Directors Guild Award. One of his final films was the long-awaited screen adaptation of The Fantasticks (1995) which partly brought Ritchie back to his theatrical roots. ANN SOTHERN: 1909 - 2001 Actress Ann Sothern passed away on March 15th at the age of 89. Her film career spanned sixty years and included a Best Supporting Actress Oscar nomination for The Whales of August (1987) and several Emmy nominations for her roles in the TV shows Private Secretary (1953) and The Ann Sothern Show (1958). Sothern was born as Harriette Lake in North Dakota. She made her first film appearance in 1927 in small roles (so small, in fact, that some sources omit any films before 1929) before deciding to work on Broadway instead. Shortly afterwards she signed with Columbia Pictures where studio head Harry Cohn insisted she change her name because there were already too many actors with the last name of Lake. So "Ann" came from her mother's name Annette and "Sothern" from Shakespearean actor E.H. Sothern. For most of the 1930s she appeared in light comedies working with Eddie Cantor, Maurice Chevalier, Mickey Rooney and Fredric March. However, it wasn't until she switched to MGM (after a brief period with RKO) and made the film Maisie (1939) that Sothern hit pay dirt. It proved enormously popular and led to a series of nine more films through 1947 when she moved into dramas and musicals. During the 50s, Sothern made a mark with her TV series but returned to mostly second tier movies in the 1960s and 1970s. Finally she earned an Oscar nomination for her work in 1987's The Whales of August (in which, incidentally, her daughter Tisha Sterling played her at an earlier age). Turner Classic Movies plans to host a retrospective film tribute to her in July. Check back for details in June.

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States Fall September 30, 1994

Released in United States on Video February 15, 1995

Began shooting January 10, 1994.

Completed shooting April 15, 1994.

Released in United States on Video February 15, 1995

Released in United States Fall September 30, 1994