Two Guys from Milwaukee


1h 30m 1946
Two Guys from Milwaukee

Brief Synopsis

A runaway prince in disguise takes up with a taxi driver.

Film Details

Genre
Comedy
Release Date
Aug 17, 1946
Premiere Information
New York opening: week of 27 Jul 1946
Production Company
Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
Distribution Company
Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
Country
United States

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 30m
Sound
Mono (RCA Sound System)
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1

Synopsis

When his train arrives at Pennsylvania Station in New York City, Balkan Prince Henry, who is determined to learn what life is like for ordinary people, slips away and is befriended by taxi driver Buzz Williams. Henry claims to be from Milwaukee, which is also Buzz's hometown. Buzz introduces Henry to boilermakers and later, invites him to his home in Brooklyn, where he lives with his sister Nan Evans and her daughter Peggy. The next morning, Henry's identity is revealed when newspaper headlines announce that he has been kidnapped. Henry explains that he intends to return before his country holds a plebescite to determine if it will become a republic. In the meantime, Buzz suggests that Henry disguise himself by shaving his mustache at the barber shop where Buzz's girl friend, Connie Read, works as a manicurist. Buzz arranges a double date with Polly, Connie's friend, for that evening and asks Connie to show Henry around the city in the meantime. By the end of the day, Connie and Henry have become attracted to each other, and she proposes that they dine alone together, rather than meet Buzz and Polly at Happy's Hash House as they had originally planned. Henry telephones his companion, Count Oswald, to bring money to Happy's to pay Buzz for his expenses from the previous night. After dinner, when Henry and Connie join Buzz, Polly and Oswald, Henry suggests they all go to the movies. To pay for his ticket, Buzz unwittingly uses the foreign money that he received from Oswald, and the theater manager calls the FBI, who follow Henry to Connie's apartment. Henry reluctantly returns with the agents to the hotel, where Oswald is waiting for him. The following morning, Peggy tells Henry that Buzz is miserably jealous and begs him to reunite Buzz and Connie. Henry then invites everyone to the hotel to hear his radio broadcast to the people of his country. While Connie tries to convince Buzz that he does not love her, Henry practices his speech. He asks Buzz for help, and Buzz speaks passionately about his love for the United States. Unknown to the men, their rehearsal is accidentally transmitted over the radio, and Buzz becomes famous. Connie is so impressed that she goes back to Buzz. The people of Henry's country are also affected by Buzz's speech and vote for a republic. Now that he is no longer a prince, Henry decides to stay in the United States and rushes to tell Connie. Both he and Buzz propose marriage to Connie, and she wavers between Buzz, whom she has known all her life, and Henry, who is new and exciting. Finally, however, Connie realizes that she has always loved Buzz. A disappointed Henry leaves for Milwaukee, where he has been offered a job with a beer company, and is temporarily distracted when he notices Lauren Bacall, his favorite movie star, is also on the plane. His excitement is cut short, however, by the appearance of her husband, Humphrey Bogart.

Videos

Movie Clip

Two Guys From Milwaukee (1946) -- Hooking Up With A Prince Nearing the end, New York cabbie Buzz (Jack Carson) is trying to persuade his longtime gal Connie (Joan Leslie) to choose him over visiting European prince Henry (Dennis Morgan), with whom he’s now reconciled, and who’s about to address his country by radio, in Two Guys From Milwaukee, 1946.
Two Guys From Milwaukee (1946) - Pennsylvania Station Opening the first Dennis Morgan-Jack Carson buddy comedy, Dennis is a prince from somewhere (and a Lauren Bacall fan) arriving Penn Station on the train, S.Z. Sakall his assistant, and Jack a cabbie with other matters on his mind, in Two Guys From Milwaukee, 1946, co-starring Joan Leslie.
Two Guys From Milwaukee (1946) - It's The Royal Seal Dennis Morgan is Prince Henry, gone incognito in New York, having his mustache removed at a barber shop, as his pal, Cabbie Buzz (Jack Carson) pawns his royal cigarette case, and we meet Buzz’s gal, manicurist Connie (Joan Leslie) and her pal Polly (Janis Paige), in Two Guys From Milwaukee, 1946.
Two Guys From Milwaukee (1946) - Aren't You Lauren Bacall? Manicurist Connie (Joan Leslie) drags boyfriend Buzz (Jack Carson) along to see off now former-prince Henry (Dennis Morgan), catching the plane for Milwaukee, and she tricks them both, and Warner Bros. executes the only known Bogart-Bacall cameo, the finalè in Two Guys From Milwaukee, 1946.
Two Guys From Milwaukee (1946) - Some Balkan Playboy The principals meet, Jack Carson as New York cabbie Buzz, and Dennis Morgan as a European prince who has ditched his entourage on arrival at Penn Station in New York, seeking real life experience, together meeting Happy (Tom D’Andrea) at the diner, in Two Guys From Milwaukee, 1946.

Trailer

Hosted Intro

Film Details

Genre
Comedy
Release Date
Aug 17, 1946
Premiere Information
New York opening: week of 27 Jul 1946
Production Company
Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
Distribution Company
Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
Country
United States

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 30m
Sound
Mono (RCA Sound System)
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1

Articles

Two Guys from Milwaukee - Two Guys From Milwaukee


During the 1940s and '50s, Dennis Morgan and Jack Carson were Warner Bros.' answer to Paramount's Bing Crosby and Bob Hope Ð a crooner and comic who traded wisecracks while sharing unlikely adventures and an easygoing rapport. In addition to musicals costarring such talents as Doris Day and Ann Sheridan, Morgan and Carson had their own starring vehicles in Two Guys From Milwaukee and Two Guys From Texas (1948).

In the first film, Morgan - in an unlikely bit of casting for the Wisconsin native with a Midwestern twang - plays a Balkan prince named Henry who dreams of seeing the "real" America and meeting Lauren Bacall. Still riding a wave of popularity from her sultry film debut opposite future husband Humphrey Bogart in To Have and Have Not (1944), Bacall was then one of the country's leading sex symbols. Carson plays a cabbie that coaches the prince on American manners and morals and inadvertently leads to Henry's country voting to become a democracy.

Finding himself out of a job in the film's final scene, Henry books a flight to Milwaukee with plans of becoming a beer salesman. And who should be seated next to him but the dream girl herself - Bacall! So what happens to the guy's wish fulfillment when Bogie, the ultimate tough guy, also shows up? Bogart and Bacall made their guest appearance (in what would now be called "cameos") as a lark - although the publicity didn't hurt their next co-starring vehicle, The Big Sleep (1946), which opened a month after Two Guys From Milwaukee. Although filmed immediately after To Have and Have Not, The Big Sleep had been delayed for a year and a half, making Two Guys From Milwaukee the Bogarts' second in a total of five joint screen appearances.

Producer: Alex Gottlieb
Director: David Butler
Screenplay: I.A.L. Diamond, Charles Hoffman
Art Direction: Leo K. Kuter
Costume Design: Leah Rhodes
Cinematography: Arthur Edeson
Editing: Irene Morra
Original Music: Frederick Hollander
Principal Cast: Dennis Morgan (Prince Henry), Jack Carson (Buzz Williams), Joan Leslie (Connie Reed), Janis Paige (Polly), S.Z. Sakall (Count Oswald), Patti Brady (Peggy), Rosemary DeCamp (Nan), Humphrey Bogart and Lauren Bacall (themselves; unbilled).
BW-91m. Closed captioning.

by Roger Fristoe
Two Guys From Milwaukee - Two Guys From Milwaukee

Two Guys from Milwaukee - Two Guys From Milwaukee

During the 1940s and '50s, Dennis Morgan and Jack Carson were Warner Bros.' answer to Paramount's Bing Crosby and Bob Hope Ð a crooner and comic who traded wisecracks while sharing unlikely adventures and an easygoing rapport. In addition to musicals costarring such talents as Doris Day and Ann Sheridan, Morgan and Carson had their own starring vehicles in Two Guys From Milwaukee and Two Guys From Texas (1948). In the first film, Morgan - in an unlikely bit of casting for the Wisconsin native with a Midwestern twang - plays a Balkan prince named Henry who dreams of seeing the "real" America and meeting Lauren Bacall. Still riding a wave of popularity from her sultry film debut opposite future husband Humphrey Bogart in To Have and Have Not (1944), Bacall was then one of the country's leading sex symbols. Carson plays a cabbie that coaches the prince on American manners and morals and inadvertently leads to Henry's country voting to become a democracy. Finding himself out of a job in the film's final scene, Henry books a flight to Milwaukee with plans of becoming a beer salesman. And who should be seated next to him but the dream girl herself - Bacall! So what happens to the guy's wish fulfillment when Bogie, the ultimate tough guy, also shows up? Bogart and Bacall made their guest appearance (in what would now be called "cameos") as a lark - although the publicity didn't hurt their next co-starring vehicle, The Big Sleep (1946), which opened a month after Two Guys From Milwaukee. Although filmed immediately after To Have and Have Not, The Big Sleep had been delayed for a year and a half, making Two Guys From Milwaukee the Bogarts' second in a total of five joint screen appearances. Producer: Alex Gottlieb Director: David Butler Screenplay: I.A.L. Diamond, Charles Hoffman Art Direction: Leo K. Kuter Costume Design: Leah Rhodes Cinematography: Arthur Edeson Editing: Irene Morra Original Music: Frederick Hollander Principal Cast: Dennis Morgan (Prince Henry), Jack Carson (Buzz Williams), Joan Leslie (Connie Reed), Janis Paige (Polly), S.Z. Sakall (Count Oswald), Patti Brady (Peggy), Rosemary DeCamp (Nan), Humphrey Bogart and Lauren Bacall (themselves; unbilled). BW-91m. Closed captioning. by Roger Fristoe

Quotes

Trivia

Notes

The movie that the characters watch in this picture is the 1945 Warner Bros. film To Have and Have Not (see below). On August 19, 1946, actress Joan Leslie filed a $2,725,000 suit against Warner Bros., charging that the studio reduced her billing from star to featured player after she had won a suit breaking her contract (see note for The Chase above). On October 29, 1946, the studio filed an answer denying the charges and asking for dismissal of the suit with court costs. Warner Bros. argued that star billing was "optional based on merit, proficiency and drawing power."

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States Summer August 17, 1946

Released in United States Summer August 17, 1946