The Muppet Movie


1h 37m 1979

Brief Synopsis

Orson Welles interpreta Lew Lord, potente e famoso produttore cinematografico, contattato per produrre un film con Kermit la Rana e gli altri Muppets, dopo aver trattato con il loro agente.

Film Details

Also Known As
Muppet Movie, Muppets: Ça, c'est du cinéma
MPAA Rating
Release Date
1979

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 37m
Sound
Dolby
Color
Color (Eastmancolor)

Synopsis

Kermit and the gang decide to take a trip to Hollywood. They begin their journey on a bicycle pedalled by Kermit, but friends accumulate along the way, and they change vehicles to accomodate them. They have the additional challenge of fending off the entreaties of the heartless Doc Hopper who wants Kermit to make some advertisements promoting fried frog legs. Kermit must also cope with his amorous feelings for Miss Piggy, and hers for him. Once in Hollywood they encounter many stars.

Crew

Sherry Amott

Puppets Design

Kenny Ascher

Music

Martin G Baker

Technical Coordinator

Sidney R. Baldwin

Photography

Edgar Bergen

Other

Ulla Bourne

Script Supervisor

Jack Burns

Screenplay

Gwen Capetanos

Costume Designer

Ed Christie

Puppets Design

Joe Collins

Key Grip

David Dockendorf

Sound

Charles Durning

Song Performer

Richard Edesa

Camera Operator

Buck Edwards

Location Manager

Bonnie Erickson

Puppets Design

Faz Fazakas

Puppets Design

Fred Fisher

Production Assistant

Penny Adams Flowers

Assistant Director

Michael Flynn

Production Assistant

Ian Freebairn-smith

Music

Ian Freebairn-smith

Music Arranger

Michael K Frith

Consultant

Les Gobruegge

Art Director

Richard Goddard

Set Decorator

Dave Goelz

Song Performer

Dave Goelz

Puppets Design

Horst Grandt

Props

Christopher Greenbury

Editor

Julia Harmount

Set Designer

Calista Hendrickson

Costumes

Jim Henson

Producer

Jim Henson

Song Performer

Bruce Hill

Camera Operator

Lindsay Hill

Video

Richard Holloway

Technical Coordinator

Richard Hunt

Song Performer

Larry Jameson

Puppets Design

Jerry Juhl

Screenplay

Mari Kaestle

Puppets Design

Julius King

Set Designer

Lynn M Klugman

Production Coordinator

Robert L Knott

Special Effects

David Lazer

Coproducer

Janet Lerman-graff

Puppets Design

Charles Lewis

Sound

Kermit Love

Puppets Design

John Lovelady

Puppets Design

Robert Lowry

Video

Leigh Malone

Consultant

Isidore Mankofsky

Director Of Photography

Isidore Mankofsky

Other

Johnny Mathis

Song Performer

Wendy Midener

Puppets Design

Kathryn Mullen

Puppets Design

Paul Nelson

Video Playback

Kurt Neuman

Production Manager

Ben Nye Jr.

Makeup

Frank Oz

Song Performer

Frank Oz

Creative Consultant

Steve Polivka

Assistant Editor

James Potter

Post-Production Supervisor

Marcia Reed

Photography

Lee Rose

Production Associate

Don Sahlin

Puppets Design

Joel Schiller

Production Designer

Gus Schirmer

Casting

John Shannon

Photography

Shirley Snyder

Production Coordinator

Tom Southwell

Production

Martin Starger

Executive Producer

Teresa Stokovic

Production Coordinator

Amy Van Gilder

Puppets Design

Caroly Wilcox

Puppets Design

Paul H. Williams

Music

Paul H. Williams

Song

William Wistrom

Sound Effects Editor

Ron L Wright

Assistant Director

Film Details

Also Known As
Muppet Movie, Muppets: Ça, c'est du cinéma
MPAA Rating
Release Date
1979

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 37m
Sound
Dolby
Color
Color (Eastmancolor)

Award Nominations

Best Score

1979

Best Song

1979

Articles

Richard Pryor (1940-2005)


The scathing, brilliantly insightful African-American comic who proved himself on many occasions to be a highly competent screen actor, died of a heart attack on November 10 at his Encino, California home. He was 65. He had been reclusive for years after he publicly announced he was suffering from multiple sclerosis in 1992.

He was born Richard Thomas Pryor III on December 1, 1940 in Peoria, Illinois. By all accounts, his childhood was a difficult one. His mother was a prostitute and his grandmother ran a brothel. His father was rarely around and when he was, he would physically abuse him. From a young age, Pryor knew that humor was his weapon of choice to cut through all the swath he came across and would confront in his life.

After high school, he enlisted in the Army for a two-year stint (1958-60). When he was discharged (honorably!) he concentrated on stand-up comedy and worked in a series of nightclubs before relocating to New York City in 1963. In 1964, he made his television debut when he was given a slot on the variety program On Broadway Tonight. His routine, though hardly the groundbreaking material we would witness in later years, was very well received, and in the late '60s Pryor found more television work: Toast of the Town, The Wild Wild West, The Mod Squad ; and was cast in a two movies: The Busy Body (1967) with Sid Caesar; and Wild in the Streets (1968) a cartoonish political fantasy about the internment of all American citizens over 30.

Pryor's career really didn't ignite until the '70s. His stand up act became raunchier and more politically motivated as he touched on issued of race, failed relationships, drug addiction, and street crimes. His movie roles became far more captivating in the process: the piano man in Lady Sings the Blues (1972); as a wise-talking hustler in a pair of slick urban thrillers: The Mack (1973) and Uptown Saturday Night (1974); the gregarious Daddy Rich in Car Wash; his first pairing with Gene Wilder as Grover, the car thief who helps stops a runaway train in his first real box office smash Silver Streak (both 1976); and for many critics, his finest dramatic performance as a factory worker on the edge of depression in Paul Schrader's excellent working class drama Blue Collar (1978).

On a personal level, his drug dependency problem worsened, and on June 9, 1980, near tragedy struck when he caught fire while free-basing cocaine. Pryor later admitted that the incident, was, in fact, a suicide attempt, and that his management company created the lie for the press in hopes of protecting him. Fortunately, Pryor had three films in the can that all achieved some level of financial success soon after his setback: another pairing with Gene Wilder in the prison comedy Stir Crazy (1980); a blisteringly funny cameo as God who flips off Andy Kaufman in the warped religious satire In God We Tru$t (1980); an a ex-con helping a social worker (Cicely Tyson) with her foster charges in Bustin' Loose (1981). He capped his recovery with Live on the Sunset Strip (1982), a first-rate documentation of the comic's genius performed in front of a raucous live audience.

In 1983, Pryor signed a $40 million, five-year contract with Columbia Pictures. For many fans and critics, this was the beginning of his downslide. His next few films: The Toy, Superman III (both 1983), and Brewster's Millions (1985) were just tiresome, mediocre comedies. Jo Jo Dancer, Your Life is Calling (1986), was his only attempt at producing, directing, and acting, and the film, which was an ambitious autobiographical account of a his life and career, was a box-office disappointment. He spent the remainder of the '80s in middling fare: Condition Critical (1987), Moving; a third pairing with Gene Wilder in See No Evil, Hear No Evil; and his only teaming with Eddie Murphy in Harlem Nights (1989).

In 1986, Pryor was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis, a degenerative disease of the nervous system that curtailed both his personal appearances and his gift for physical comedy in his latter films. By the '90s, little was seen of Pryor, but in 1995, he made a courageous comeback on television when he guest starred on Chicago Hope as an embittered multiple sclerosis patient. His performance earned him an Emmy nomination and he was cast in a few more films: Mad Dog Time (1996), Lost Highway (1997), but his physical ailments prohibited him from performing on a regular basis. In 1998, The John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts in Washington gave Pryor the first Mark Twain Prize for humor. It was fitting tribute for a man who had given so much honesty and innovation in the field of comedy. Pryor is survived by his wife, Jennifer Lee; his sons Richard and Steven; and daughters Elizabeth, Rain and Renee.

by Michael T. Toole
Richard Pryor (1940-2005)

Richard Pryor (1940-2005)

The scathing, brilliantly insightful African-American comic who proved himself on many occasions to be a highly competent screen actor, died of a heart attack on November 10 at his Encino, California home. He was 65. He had been reclusive for years after he publicly announced he was suffering from multiple sclerosis in 1992. He was born Richard Thomas Pryor III on December 1, 1940 in Peoria, Illinois. By all accounts, his childhood was a difficult one. His mother was a prostitute and his grandmother ran a brothel. His father was rarely around and when he was, he would physically abuse him. From a young age, Pryor knew that humor was his weapon of choice to cut through all the swath he came across and would confront in his life. After high school, he enlisted in the Army for a two-year stint (1958-60). When he was discharged (honorably!) he concentrated on stand-up comedy and worked in a series of nightclubs before relocating to New York City in 1963. In 1964, he made his television debut when he was given a slot on the variety program On Broadway Tonight. His routine, though hardly the groundbreaking material we would witness in later years, was very well received, and in the late '60s Pryor found more television work: Toast of the Town, The Wild Wild West, The Mod Squad ; and was cast in a two movies: The Busy Body (1967) with Sid Caesar; and Wild in the Streets (1968) a cartoonish political fantasy about the internment of all American citizens over 30. Pryor's career really didn't ignite until the '70s. His stand up act became raunchier and more politically motivated as he touched on issued of race, failed relationships, drug addiction, and street crimes. His movie roles became far more captivating in the process: the piano man in Lady Sings the Blues (1972); as a wise-talking hustler in a pair of slick urban thrillers: The Mack (1973) and Uptown Saturday Night (1974); the gregarious Daddy Rich in Car Wash; his first pairing with Gene Wilder as Grover, the car thief who helps stops a runaway train in his first real box office smash Silver Streak (both 1976); and for many critics, his finest dramatic performance as a factory worker on the edge of depression in Paul Schrader's excellent working class drama Blue Collar (1978). On a personal level, his drug dependency problem worsened, and on June 9, 1980, near tragedy struck when he caught fire while free-basing cocaine. Pryor later admitted that the incident, was, in fact, a suicide attempt, and that his management company created the lie for the press in hopes of protecting him. Fortunately, Pryor had three films in the can that all achieved some level of financial success soon after his setback: another pairing with Gene Wilder in the prison comedy Stir Crazy (1980); a blisteringly funny cameo as God who flips off Andy Kaufman in the warped religious satire In God We Tru$t (1980); an a ex-con helping a social worker (Cicely Tyson) with her foster charges in Bustin' Loose (1981). He capped his recovery with Live on the Sunset Strip (1982), a first-rate documentation of the comic's genius performed in front of a raucous live audience. In 1983, Pryor signed a $40 million, five-year contract with Columbia Pictures. For many fans and critics, this was the beginning of his downslide. His next few films: The Toy, Superman III (both 1983), and Brewster's Millions (1985) were just tiresome, mediocre comedies. Jo Jo Dancer, Your Life is Calling (1986), was his only attempt at producing, directing, and acting, and the film, which was an ambitious autobiographical account of a his life and career, was a box-office disappointment. He spent the remainder of the '80s in middling fare: Condition Critical (1987), Moving; a third pairing with Gene Wilder in See No Evil, Hear No Evil; and his only teaming with Eddie Murphy in Harlem Nights (1989). In 1986, Pryor was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis, a degenerative disease of the nervous system that curtailed both his personal appearances and his gift for physical comedy in his latter films. By the '90s, little was seen of Pryor, but in 1995, he made a courageous comeback on television when he guest starred on Chicago Hope as an embittered multiple sclerosis patient. His performance earned him an Emmy nomination and he was cast in a few more films: Mad Dog Time (1996), Lost Highway (1997), but his physical ailments prohibited him from performing on a regular basis. In 1998, The John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts in Washington gave Pryor the first Mark Twain Prize for humor. It was fitting tribute for a man who had given so much honesty and innovation in the field of comedy. Pryor is survived by his wife, Jennifer Lee; his sons Richard and Steven; and daughters Elizabeth, Rain and Renee. by Michael T. Toole

Quotes

Someday we'll find it, the rainbow connection. The Lovers, the Dreamers, and me.
- Kermit the Frog
It's a good thing frogs can hop, or I'd be gone with the Schwin.
- Kermit the Frog
I'm a professional. I've had three performances.
- Fozzie Bear
Oh, I'm so Nervous. If this movie's no good, I won't be able to live with myself.
- Fozzie Bear
Well, then you'll have to get another apartment.
- Dr. Bunson Honeydew
Ahh, a bear in his natural habitat - a Studebaker.
- Fozzie Bear

Trivia

Jim Henson (I) spent an entire day in a 50-gallon steel drum submerged in a pond for the opening scene of Kermit in the swamp.

The film was an analogy for 'Henson, Jim' 's rise to fame.

(voice by Carroll Spinney) from Henson's famous TV show, "Sesame Street" (1969). Big Bird tells Kermit that he's going to New York to break into public television - an obvious reference to Henson's Sesame Street.

This was the last movie to feature famed vaudevillian Edgar Bergen and his wooden sidekick, Charlie McCarthy. It held particular meaning for Jim Henson who cited, on many occasions, how Edgar Bergen and Charlie McCarthy were the major reason he took an interest in puppetry.

the waiter in the small town restaurant where Kermit and Piggy eat their first dinner.

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States June 1979

Released in United States Summer June 22, 1979

Re-released in United States on Video March 24, 1995

Released in United States June 2009

Shown at Los Angeles Film Festival (Free Screenings) June 18-28, 2009.

Released in United States June 1979

Released in United States Summer June 22, 1979

Re-released in United States on Video March 24, 1995

Released in United States June 2009 (Shown at Los Angeles Film Festival (Free Screenings) June 18-28, 2009.)