Mr. Ace


1h 24m 1946

Brief Synopsis

Margaret Wyndham Chase (Sylvia Sidney) wants to run for governor and approches Eddie Ace (George Raft), local political kingmaker/fringe gangster, to get his support. Ace's belief is that "beautiful women and politics do not mix" and he declines to help. She decides to play the game rough-and-tough without him, but he shows he is even rougher-and-tougher, and she gives up and withdraws from the race. But Ace has fallen in love with her at about the 45-minute mark and, with his new-found ardor for clean politics, he makes some (unclean) manipulations behind the scenes, and she is picked to run on an independent good-government ticket.

Film Details

Release Date
Aug 2, 1946
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Tivoli Productions, Inc.
Distribution Company
United Artists Corp.
Country
United States

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 24m
Sound
Mono
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1

Synopsis

When congresswoman Margaret Wyndham Chase decides to run for governor, she realizes that she must get the support of political boss Eddie Ace in order to win. To that end, she invites Ace to dinner, along with political science professor Joshua Adams and some of her influential friends. Before the dinner, Margaret's husband, Pembroke Chase III, begs her for the annulment she promised, but she refuses, explaining that she wishes to maintain the marriage for political purposes. When Chase threatens to interfere with her campaign, she threatens to reveal his womanizing. At dinner, Adams chastises Margaret for failing to fulfill her "female function" and speaks disapprovingly of her involvement in politics. Ace also discourages Margaret from running "because beautiful women don't belong in politics." Later, Adams asks Ace to prevent Margaret from being elected, even though he believes that she would make a good governor if she learned to use her heart. Still determined to change Ace's mind, Margaret asks Adams to invite her and Ace to dinner. Afterward, she asks Ace to drop her at her country cottage. Because it is raining hard, Margaret suggests that Ace spend the night on the couch. Ace kisses her goodnight, although he still refuses to support her campaign. The following day, Margaret approaches Toomey, one of Ace's men, and asks for his support. Toomey agrees to double-cross Ace, and with his help, Margaret wins the nomination. Margaret's triumph is shortlived, however, because Chase tells her that he intends to divorce her naming Ace as a co-respondent. When Margaret protests that nothing happened the night Ace stayed at the cottage, Chase reveals that Ace will testify to the contrary. Margaret is forced to rethink her position and withdraws from the race. She also tells Chase that she will divorce him and leaves immediately for Reno. Ace then visits Adams, who is delighted by Margaret's withdrawal, and asks him to head an independent party, which will back a reformed Margaret. Adams agrees and now asks Margaret to run on a platform opposed to machine politics. Margaret re-enters the race and wins the election. Afterward, Adams reveals Ace's secret participation in her campaign. While they talk, Ace arrives and demands that Margaret give him his share of the spoils. His request is that she try to be the best governor that she can. Margaret seals her agreement with a kiss.

Film Details

Release Date
Aug 2, 1946
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Tivoli Productions, Inc.
Distribution Company
United Artists Corp.
Country
United States

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 24m
Sound
Mono
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1

Quotes

Trivia

Notes

The film's working title was Mr. Ace and the Queen. According to an March 11, 1946 Hollywood Reporter news item, the production shut down for three weeks when George Raft was hospitalized for pleurisy. According to the film's credits, the song "Now and Then" was introduced by Joyce Bryant and the Flennoy Trio.