Kiss the Boys Goodbye


1h 25m 1941

Film Details

Release Date
Aug 1, 1941
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Paramount Pictures, Inc.
Distribution Company
Paramount Pictures, Inc.
Country
United States
Screenplay Information
Based on the play Kiss the Boys Goodbye by Clare Boothe (New York, 28 Sep 1938).

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 25m
Sound
Mono
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1
Film Length
7,683ft (9 reels)

Synopsis

New York chorus girl Cindy Lou Bethany becomes frustrated when she prepares for an audition for a Broadway musical, but the auditions close and her roommate, Gwen Abbott, is hired to be secretary to Top Rumson, the show's financial backer. Gwen tells Cindy that the director, Lloyd Lloyd, and composer, Dick Rayburn, have been sent to the South on a talent search for a classic Southern belle type to star in the show, although their shows usually feature Myra Stanhope, an actress whose style is hopelessly inappropriate for this show. Desperate for work, Cindy returns to her aunt Lily Lou and uncle Jefferson Davis Bethany's home in the South and schemes to get Lloyd and Rayburn to audition her. Uncle Jeff waylays Lloyd and Rayburn off their train and brings them to Magnolia Manor, where Cindy, donning a nineteenth-century dress and manner, proceeds to sing for her captive audience, backed by a chorus of black singers. Lloyd, who remains steadfastly in support of Myra, knows he is being framed and resents Cindy's presumption. However, Rayburn is delighted by Cindy and unknown to Lloyd, asks her to return to New York with them. Cindy, who previously worked hard to lose her Southern accent, continues to play up her heritage, much to the irritation of Lloyd, who does not want to have to direct an apparent amateur. When the show's producer, Bert Fisher, arranges for their "discovery" to be introduced to the press during an evening at Rumson's home, Lloyd finally relents and arranges for Cindy to sing a love song. However, Cindy learns from Gwen that Lloyd has been planning to star Myra all along and Cindy vengefully decides to perform a striptease that she had prepared with Rayburn. The audience and Lloyd are impressed with her sophisticated revue, which ends as she tosses her lace pantaloons onto Myra's head and dives into the pool. Myra then picks a fight with Cindy, who loses her temper and pushes the actress into the pool. Cindy packs to leave, and unable to take the strain any longer, admits her ruse and insists that she did it out of desperation. Cindy returns to the South and Lloyd realizes he has just lost a fine actress. At Magnolia Manor, Cindy is surprised when she is serenaded by Lloyd, backed by a chorus, and the couple, finally admitting their love for each other, embrace.

Film Details

Release Date
Aug 1, 1941
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Paramount Pictures, Inc.
Distribution Company
Paramount Pictures, Inc.
Country
United States
Screenplay Information
Based on the play Kiss the Boys Goodbye by Clare Boothe (New York, 28 Sep 1938).

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 25m
Sound
Mono
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1
Film Length
7,683ft (9 reels)

Quotes

Trivia

Notes

Early pre-production news items in Hollywood Reporter note that Walter Abel (who did not appear in the final film) was assigned a principal role, that Ray Milland and Eddie Albert were considered for roles and that Frank Tuttle was considered to direct. In 1940, Twentieth Century-Fox contract actor Don Ameche pulled out of the cast of Paramount's The Night of January 16th, (see below) engendering a lawsuit against him by Paramount. The situation was settled when Ameche agreed to appear in Kiss the Boys Goodbye. Although reviews such as Daily Variety noted that the black chorus in the film, described as "field hands" in the script, was "one of the highlights," the singers were not credited in contemporary sources. According to information in the Paramount Collection at the AMPAS Library, dancer Louis DaPron was slated to appear in the film.