Four Weddings and A Funeral


1h 56m 1994

Brief Synopsis

A young man's chance encounters with a beautiful woman are complicated by his close-knit extended family.

Film Details

Also Known As
Cuatro Bodas y Un Funeral, Fyra bröllop och en begravning, Quatre mariages et un enterrement, Quatro Casamentos Em Un Funeral
MPAA Rating
Genre
Comedy
Romance
Romantic Comedy
Release Date
1994
Production Company
Angels the Costumiers; Aon/Albert G. Ruben Insurance Services; Capital Fx; Dda Public Relations; Eastman Film; Eastman Kodak; Film4 Productions; Frameline Ltd; International Film Guarantors; Kevin O'Shea; Pinewood Studios, Ltd.; Polygram Filmed Entertainment; The Jim Henson Company; WB De Lane Lea; Working Title Films
Distribution Company
Gramercy Pictures; Ascot Elite Entertainment Group; Gramercy Pictures; Independent Productions; Meteor Film Productions; Pan Europeenne; Polygram Video; Rank Film Distributors Inc; Rank Film Distributors Ltd; Rep; Toho-Towa Company; Walt Disney Studios Motion Pictures International
Location
London, England, United Kingdom

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 56m

Synopsis

Romantic comedy about Charles, a noncommittal Englishman who meets Carrie--the American girl of his dreams--at a mutual friend's wedding and proceeds to awkwardly woo her through one funeral and three more weddings--one of which happens to be her own. Finally Charles discovers himself standing at the altar on his own wedding day, betrothed to a woman he has no desire to spend the rest of his life with.

Cast

Hugh Grant

Charles

Andie Macdowell

Carrie

James Fleet

Tom

Simon Callow

Gareth

John Hannah

Matthew

Kristin Scott Thomas

Fiona

David Bower

David

Charlotte Coleman

Scarlett

David Scott Rubin

Cast (Ca)

Timothy Walker

Angus The Groom

Sara Crowe

Laura The Bride

Ronald Herdman

Vicar

Elspet Gray

Laura'S Mother

Philip Voss

Laura'S Father

Rupert Vansittart

George The Boor At The Boatman

Nicola Walker

Frightful Folk Duo

Paul Stacey

Frightful Folk Duo

Simon Kunz

John With The Unfaithful Wife

Rowan Atkinson

Father Gerald

Robin Mccaffrey

Serena

Michael Mears

The Boatman Waiter

David Wright

Rock & Roll Band

Ray Uren

Rock & Roll Band

Gordon Blackwell

Rock & Roll Band

Ron Griffiths

Rock & Roll Band

David Haig

Bernard The Groom (2nd Wedding)

Sophie Thompson

Lydia The Bride (2nd Wedding)

Corin Redgrave

Hamish (2nd Wedding)

Donald Weedon

Master Of Ceremonies (2nd Wedding)

Nigel Hastings

Tea-Tasting Alistair (2nd Wedding)

Emily Morgan

Vomiting Veronica (2nd Wedding)

Amanda Mealing

Naughty Nicki (2nd Wedding)

Melissa Knatchbull

Mocking Martha (2nd Wedding)

Polly Kemp

Miss Piggy (2nd Wedding)

Anna Chancellor

Henrietta (2nd Wedding)

Hannah Taylor Gordon

Young Bridesmaid (2nd Wedding)

Bernice Stegers

Shop Assistant (2nd Wedding)

Robert Lang

Lord Hibbott (2nd Wedding)

Jeremy Kemp

Sir John Delaney (2nd Wedding)

Rosalie Crutchely

Mrs Beaumont (2nd Wedding)

Richard Allen

Swing Band (2nd Wedding)

Mark James

Swing Band (2nd Wedding)

Jason Bruer

Swing Band (2nd Wedding)

Simon Wallace

Swing Band (2nd Wedding)

James Mcdermid

Swing Band (2nd Wedding)

Bryn Burrows

Swing Band (2nd Wedding)

Paulette Ivory

Swing Band (2nd Wedding)

Ken Drury

Vicar (3rd Wedding)

Struan Rodger

Best Man (3rd Wedding)

Lucy Hornack

Marrie Woman (3rd Wedding)

Randall Paul

Chester (3rd Wedding)

Pat Starr

Gareth'S Dance Partner (3rd Wedding)

Tim Thomas

Doctor (3rd Wedding)

Neville Phillips

Vicar (Funeral)

Susanna Hamnett

Dierdre (4th Wedding)

John Abbott

Polite Verger (4th Wedding)

Richard Butler

Vicar (4th Wedding)

Kenneth Griffith

Mad Old Man

Ira Newborn

Performer

Crew

Dave Allen

Construction

Chris Allies

Title Designer

W H Auden

Other

Sue Baker

Supervising Sound Editor

Clive Banks

Thanks

Jeff Barry

Song ("Chapel Of Love")

Gerry Bates

Sound Maintenance

Sarah Beardsall

Casting Assistant

Mike Beaven

Unit Driver

Rosie Bedford-stradling

Other

Richard Rodney Bennett

Music

Oscar Beuselinck

3rd Assistant Director

Tim Bevan

Executive Producer

Bill Black

Song Arranger

Bill Black

Song Performer ("The Dashing White Sergeant" Traditional)

Mick Boggis

Assistant Dubbing Mixer

Jed Bray

Unit Driver

Richard Broome

Camera Grip

Ann Buchanan

Chief Makeup & Hair Designer

David Carr

Minibus Driver

Paul Cheesman

Dressing Props

Diane Christian

Assistant Accountant

Clare Christie

Thanks

Roy Clarke

Unit Driver

Vince Clarke

Rigging Gaffer

Mick Coulter

Dp/Cinematographer

Mick Coulter

Director Of Photography

Jimmy Coward

Generator Operator

Francesca Crowder

Hairdresser

Clive Curtis

Stunt Driver

Richard Curtis

Screenwriter

Richard Curtis

Co-Executive Producer

Wendy Dade

Assistant (To Duncan Kenworthy)

Vicki Gee Dare

Sign Language Consultant

Justin Davies

Production Runner

Ted Debrera

Standby Construction Driver

Patsy Delord

Production Coordinator

Juliette Dow

Assistant (To Executive Producers (Working Title))

Wendy Ebsworth

Sign Language Consultant

Terry Edland

Gaffer

Nigel Egerton

Wardrobe Assistant

Julia Etterman

Makeup/Hair Production Assistant

Eric Fellner

Executive Producer

Simon Finney

2nd Camera Assistant

John Fishlock

Thanks

Nick Flowers

Boom Operator

Leah Foley

Standin

Jane Frazer

Production Executive (Working Title)

Peter Freeman

Co-2nd Assistant Director

Emma Freud

Script Editor

Toni Gard

Assistance With Andie Macdowell'S Wardrobe

Darren Gattrell

Electrician

Jeremy Gee

2nd Camera Operator

George Gershwin

Song ("But Not For Me")

Ira Gershwin

Song ("But Not For Me")

Valentina Giambanco

2nd Assistant Editor

Andy Glen

Foley Editor

Marilyn Goldsworthy

Cashier

Maggie Gray

Production Designer

Diane Greaves

Foley Artist

Ellie Greenwich

Song ("Chapel Of Love")

Clare Greenwood

Caterer

Jon Gregory

Editor

Michelle Guish

Casting Director

Deborah Harding

Production Executive (Working Title)

Ken Hawkey

Other

Debra Hayward

Head Of Development (Working Title)

Nick Heather

Wardrobe Bus Driver

Lindy Hemming

Costume Designer

Peter Howard

Camera Trainee

Natasha Hudson

Caterer

Tom Innes

Standby Props Driver

Charlie Ixer

Other

Gary Ixer

Standby Propman

Christian James

Floor Runner

Elton John

Song Performer ("But Not For Me" "Chapel Of Love")

Dave Jones

Other

Paul Kemp

Electrician

Duncan Kenworthy

Producer

Michael Kuhn

Other

Melissa Lackersteen

Makeup/Hair Assistant

Charlotte Laughton

Assistant (To Richard Curtis)

Wayne Leach

Bestboy

Wendy Leach

Stunt Driver

Tracy Lee

Makeup/ Hair Assistant

Dick Lewzey

Recorder & Mixer (Cts & Lansdowne Recording Studios London England)

Steve Lindsey

Song Producer ("But Not For Me" "Chapel Of Love")

John Locke

Standin

Derek Lomas

Assistant Sound Editor

Lee Lighting Ltd

Lighting Equipment Supplier

John Lunn

Music Researcher

Simon J Lycett

Other

Ian Macbeth

Editing Jobfit

Tony Marshall

Minibus Driver

Peter Maxwell

Dubbing Mixer

Andy Mayson

Other

Christian Mcwilliams

Assistant Location Manager

Wayne Michaels

Stunt Coordinator

Mark Milsome

Other

Brian Mitchell

Standby Stagehand

Jane Moore

Thanks

Stephen Morley

Stills Photographer

Angela Morrison

Legal & Business Affairs (Working Title)

Enyo Mortty

Unit Driver

Con Murphy

Other

Ira Newborn

Music Composer

Alison O'brien

Thanks

Martin O'connor

Grip Truck Driver

Kevin O'shea

Insurance

John Ott

Camera Truck Driver

Steve Pasmore

Caterer

Kieron Phipps

1st Assistant Director

Anna Pinnock

Set Decorator

Chris Plevin

Other

Elvis Presley

Song ("Love Is All Around")

Trevor Puckle

2nd Assistant Director

Sarah Rains

Assistant Dialogue Editor

Ruby Rawlins

Caterer

John Reid

Thanks

Steven Ricards

Standin

Mary Richards

Production Supervisor

Neil Richardson

Orchestral Score Conductor

Colin Ritchie

Dialogue Editor

Elaine Robertson

Publicist

Julie Robinson

Script Supervisor

Kay Robinson

Assistant (To Duncan Kenworthy)

Phil Robinson

Assistant Art Director

Odilon Rocha

Wardrobe Runner

Amber Rudd

Other

George Schembri

Caterer

John Scott

Wardrobe Supervisor

Jupiter Sen

2nd Dialogue Editor

Ian Seymour

1st Assistant Editor

Billy Sherrill

Song ("Stand By Your Man")

Paul Shersby

Location Manager

Philip Sindall

Camera Operator

Kathryn Smith

Thanks

Malcolm Smith

2nd Camera Grip

Caroline Southey

Legal & Business Affairs (Working Title)

Phil Spector

Song ("Chapel Of Love")

John Squires

Makeup/Hair Bus Driver

David Stephenson

Production Sound Mixer

Jack Stew

Foley Artist

Terry Stinson

Props Runaround Driver

Jon Symonds

Caterer

Michele Tandy

Production Accountant

Stewart Till

Thanks

Peter Tyler

Motion Control Camera

Louis Vuitton

Thanks

Peter Wallis

Dressing Props

Tommy Westbrook

Standby Carpenter

Natascha Wharton

Assistant (To Executive Producers (Working Title))

Barry Wilkinson

Property Master

Jamie Wilkinson

Dressing Props

Simon Wilkinson

Chargehand Standby Propman

Ian Wingrove

Special Effects Supervisor

Mark Wolfe

Thanks

Alison Wyldeck

Wardrobe Assistant

Allison Wyldeck

Wardrobe Assistant

Tammy Wynette

Song ("Stand By Your Man")

Film Details

Also Known As
Cuatro Bodas y Un Funeral, Fyra bröllop och en begravning, Quatre mariages et un enterrement, Quatro Casamentos Em Un Funeral
MPAA Rating
Genre
Comedy
Romance
Romantic Comedy
Release Date
1994
Production Company
Angels the Costumiers; Aon/Albert G. Ruben Insurance Services; Capital Fx; Dda Public Relations; Eastman Film; Eastman Kodak; Film4 Productions; Frameline Ltd; International Film Guarantors; Kevin O'Shea; Pinewood Studios, Ltd.; Polygram Filmed Entertainment; The Jim Henson Company; WB De Lane Lea; Working Title Films
Distribution Company
Gramercy Pictures; Ascot Elite Entertainment Group; Gramercy Pictures; Independent Productions; Meteor Film Productions; Pan Europeenne; Polygram Video; Rank Film Distributors Inc; Rank Film Distributors Ltd; Rep; Toho-Towa Company; Walt Disney Studios Motion Pictures International
Location
London, England, United Kingdom

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 56m

Award Nominations

Best Original Screenplay

1994

Best Picture

1994

Articles

Four Weddings and a Funeral


Four Weddings and a Funeral, the acclaimed 1994 British comedy, follows a group of friends in England over the course of 18 months as they attend four weddings and a funeral. Charles (Hugh Grant) is a charming, though bumbling, bachelor who is always a best man and never a groom. He knows it's time to settle down, but he is allergic to commitment, and just can't seem to meet the right girl. That is, until he meets Carrie (Andie MacDowell), a beautiful American whom he can't seem to stop running into or thinking about.

Four Weddings and a Funeral, described by Variety as "the little film that could," was a simple story shot on a miniscule budget that seemingly came out of nowhere and surprised everyone. Its charm, warmth and distinctly British humor, plus a star-making turn from Hugh Grant in the lead role, made it a gigantic-though unexpected--box office hit.

Screenwriter Richard Curtis had been mostly writing material for his friend Rowan Atkinson's popular character, Mr. Bean. He came up with the idea for Four Weddings and a Funeral based on a real event that had happened to him some years earlier. While a guest at a friend's wedding, Curtis met a girl who wanted to spend the night with him, but he turned her down. It was a decision he constantly regretted and became the motivation for his screenplay.

The script bounced around London, eventually attracting the attention of Mike Newell. The director had worked steadily in British film and television, but he had not yet broken through to a mainstream international audience. "It was handed to me in my agent's office," said Newell of the Four Weddings and a Funeral script, "by a very bright and forthright assistant who, knowing that I said 'No' to everything, sort of hit me in the chest with it and said, 'You should do that.'"

Newell loved the screenplay and committed to the project. At first, he was concerned that the characters were all too privileged, which would alienate a wider audience. "But we went to work on that," said Newell, "and tried to make the social range of things broader."

Hugh Grant, like Mike Newell, had been working steadily in film and television for years, but he was still virtually unknown to American audiences. His roles so far in films like Maurice (1987), White Mischief (1987) and Bitter Moon (1992) were serious dramatic roles, and he wasn't thought of as a comic actor. That was about to change.

When Hugh Grant auditioned for Four Weddings, he thought he was too old for the part, but he loved the script. Screenwriter Richard Curtis thought Grant was too handsome. "He genuinely didn't want me to get it," said Grant. "He thought that the character should not be posh and should not be in any way good looking. He should be a kind of everyman."

Despite Curtis' misgivings, there was no question that he completely "got" the character of Charles. His reading of the lines were spot-on, nailing every tongue-tied delivery exactly the way Curtis had always envisioned. So, Grant got the part.

For the role of Carrie, the American girl with whom Charles is smitten, Mike Newell and the others auditioned what seemed like every actress in Hollywood. Newell had recently directed the critically acclaimed film Enchanted April (1992), which had earned an Oscar® nomination for Joan Plowright, so actresses everywhere were clamoring to work with him. Jeanne Tripplehorn was finally tapped to play Carrie, but she soon had to drop out of the film for personal reasons.

Andie MacDowell, the former model-turned-actress, happened to be in the U.K. doing publicity for Groundhog Day (1993) when she heard they were looking for a replacement. She read the script and organized a meeting with Mike Newell, Duncan Kenworthy and Richard Curtis. "Every once in awhile you'll read a script that will just blow your mind," said MacDowell. "This was one of those."

Everyone liked MacDowell, and she was offered the part. To do the film, she gave up a much higher profile film that would have paid her significantly more money. The other script, she said, was terrible and she would much rather be a part of something wonderful.

One of the film's greatest assets was its colorful and memorable supporting cast. The production team brought on fuchsia-haired Charlotte Coleman to play Charles' roommate Scarlett; Simon Callow and John Hannah as gay couple Gareth and Matthew; Kristin Scott Thomas as the cynical Fiona; and David Bower as Charles' deaf brother David. Richard Curtis' old friend Rowan Atkinson ("Mr. Bean") was also brought in for a side-splitting cameo as a nervous priest presiding over his first wedding.

Four Weddings was originally set to go into production in 1992, but it wasn't ready to start until 1993. Because of the delay, the film's budget got drastically cut. Rather than abandoning the project, Kenworthy and Newell decided to move forward with it, knowing that getting something made was better than nothing. "We shook hands," said Kenworthy, "and said, 'it's going to be hard, but we'll do it together'." The film was shot in a mere 35 days.

When the film first previewed at a theater in Santa Monica, California, the cast and crew weren't sure that the film was funny at all. "The titles came up," said Mike Newell, "and nobody knew what to expect. And then about a minute and a half into the film this guy lets out this huge guffaw, and from then on it was the preview made in heaven."

The plan all along for Four Weddings and a Funeral was to open the film slowly through an enthusiastic word-of-mouth campaign since the budget was so small. Duncan Kenworthy opened it first in New York and Los Angeles, where it met with positive reviews. The Los Angeles Times called it "a tasty, sophisticated romp, a romantic comedy that wears its skill lightly, and garnishes its humor with style." Newsweek said, "Hugh Grant, who has graced the margins of many an English film, gets to step front and center in the romantic comedy Four Weddings and a Funeral and proves himself a deft and debonair leading man."

Slowly but surely Four Weddings generated a major buzz among filmgoers, and audiences began to flock to the theaters to see the wry romantic comedy. It became a surprise hit, reaching number one at the box office, and eventually becoming the highest grossing British film in history. Its success finally catapulted Hugh Grant onto the A-list, and director Mike Newell was welcomed into the Hollywood fold.

Four Weddings and a Funeral was rewarded with Academy Award nominations for Best Picture and Best Original Screenplay, while the popular soundtrack sparked a hit for the band Wet Wet Wet with the cover song "Love Is All Around," which was number one on the British charts for 15 weeks. Hugh Grant and Mike Newell worked together just one more time on An Awfully Big Adventure (1995) the following year, but Grant worked several more times with writer Richard Curtis and Duncan Kenworthy. The three teamed together on two more successful films, Notting Hill (1999) and Love Actually (2003).

Producer: Tim Bevan, Richard Curtis, Eric Fellner, Duncan Kenworthy
Director: Mike Newell
Screenplay: Richard Curtis
Cinematography: Michael Coulter
Film Editing: Jon Gregory
Art Direction: Maggie Gray
Music: Richard Rodney Bennett
Cast: Hugh Grant (Charles), Andie MacDowell (Carrie), Kristin Scott Thomas (Fiona), James Fleet (Tom), Simon Callow (Gareth), Charlotte Coleman (Scarlett).
C-117m. Letterboxed.

by Andrea Passafiume
Four Weddings And A Funeral

Four Weddings and a Funeral

Four Weddings and a Funeral, the acclaimed 1994 British comedy, follows a group of friends in England over the course of 18 months as they attend four weddings and a funeral. Charles (Hugh Grant) is a charming, though bumbling, bachelor who is always a best man and never a groom. He knows it's time to settle down, but he is allergic to commitment, and just can't seem to meet the right girl. That is, until he meets Carrie (Andie MacDowell), a beautiful American whom he can't seem to stop running into or thinking about. Four Weddings and a Funeral, described by Variety as "the little film that could," was a simple story shot on a miniscule budget that seemingly came out of nowhere and surprised everyone. Its charm, warmth and distinctly British humor, plus a star-making turn from Hugh Grant in the lead role, made it a gigantic-though unexpected--box office hit. Screenwriter Richard Curtis had been mostly writing material for his friend Rowan Atkinson's popular character, Mr. Bean. He came up with the idea for Four Weddings and a Funeral based on a real event that had happened to him some years earlier. While a guest at a friend's wedding, Curtis met a girl who wanted to spend the night with him, but he turned her down. It was a decision he constantly regretted and became the motivation for his screenplay. The script bounced around London, eventually attracting the attention of Mike Newell. The director had worked steadily in British film and television, but he had not yet broken through to a mainstream international audience. "It was handed to me in my agent's office," said Newell of the Four Weddings and a Funeral script, "by a very bright and forthright assistant who, knowing that I said 'No' to everything, sort of hit me in the chest with it and said, 'You should do that.'" Newell loved the screenplay and committed to the project. At first, he was concerned that the characters were all too privileged, which would alienate a wider audience. "But we went to work on that," said Newell, "and tried to make the social range of things broader." Hugh Grant, like Mike Newell, had been working steadily in film and television for years, but he was still virtually unknown to American audiences. His roles so far in films like Maurice (1987), White Mischief (1987) and Bitter Moon (1992) were serious dramatic roles, and he wasn't thought of as a comic actor. That was about to change. When Hugh Grant auditioned for Four Weddings, he thought he was too old for the part, but he loved the script. Screenwriter Richard Curtis thought Grant was too handsome. "He genuinely didn't want me to get it," said Grant. "He thought that the character should not be posh and should not be in any way good looking. He should be a kind of everyman." Despite Curtis' misgivings, there was no question that he completely "got" the character of Charles. His reading of the lines were spot-on, nailing every tongue-tied delivery exactly the way Curtis had always envisioned. So, Grant got the part. For the role of Carrie, the American girl with whom Charles is smitten, Mike Newell and the others auditioned what seemed like every actress in Hollywood. Newell had recently directed the critically acclaimed film Enchanted April (1992), which had earned an Oscar® nomination for Joan Plowright, so actresses everywhere were clamoring to work with him. Jeanne Tripplehorn was finally tapped to play Carrie, but she soon had to drop out of the film for personal reasons. Andie MacDowell, the former model-turned-actress, happened to be in the U.K. doing publicity for Groundhog Day (1993) when she heard they were looking for a replacement. She read the script and organized a meeting with Mike Newell, Duncan Kenworthy and Richard Curtis. "Every once in awhile you'll read a script that will just blow your mind," said MacDowell. "This was one of those." Everyone liked MacDowell, and she was offered the part. To do the film, she gave up a much higher profile film that would have paid her significantly more money. The other script, she said, was terrible and she would much rather be a part of something wonderful. One of the film's greatest assets was its colorful and memorable supporting cast. The production team brought on fuchsia-haired Charlotte Coleman to play Charles' roommate Scarlett; Simon Callow and John Hannah as gay couple Gareth and Matthew; Kristin Scott Thomas as the cynical Fiona; and David Bower as Charles' deaf brother David. Richard Curtis' old friend Rowan Atkinson ("Mr. Bean") was also brought in for a side-splitting cameo as a nervous priest presiding over his first wedding. Four Weddings was originally set to go into production in 1992, but it wasn't ready to start until 1993. Because of the delay, the film's budget got drastically cut. Rather than abandoning the project, Kenworthy and Newell decided to move forward with it, knowing that getting something made was better than nothing. "We shook hands," said Kenworthy, "and said, 'it's going to be hard, but we'll do it together'." The film was shot in a mere 35 days. When the film first previewed at a theater in Santa Monica, California, the cast and crew weren't sure that the film was funny at all. "The titles came up," said Mike Newell, "and nobody knew what to expect. And then about a minute and a half into the film this guy lets out this huge guffaw, and from then on it was the preview made in heaven." The plan all along for Four Weddings and a Funeral was to open the film slowly through an enthusiastic word-of-mouth campaign since the budget was so small. Duncan Kenworthy opened it first in New York and Los Angeles, where it met with positive reviews. The Los Angeles Times called it "a tasty, sophisticated romp, a romantic comedy that wears its skill lightly, and garnishes its humor with style." Newsweek said, "Hugh Grant, who has graced the margins of many an English film, gets to step front and center in the romantic comedy Four Weddings and a Funeral and proves himself a deft and debonair leading man." Slowly but surely Four Weddings generated a major buzz among filmgoers, and audiences began to flock to the theaters to see the wry romantic comedy. It became a surprise hit, reaching number one at the box office, and eventually becoming the highest grossing British film in history. Its success finally catapulted Hugh Grant onto the A-list, and director Mike Newell was welcomed into the Hollywood fold. Four Weddings and a Funeral was rewarded with Academy Award nominations for Best Picture and Best Original Screenplay, while the popular soundtrack sparked a hit for the band Wet Wet Wet with the cover song "Love Is All Around," which was number one on the British charts for 15 weeks. Hugh Grant and Mike Newell worked together just one more time on An Awfully Big Adventure (1995) the following year, but Grant worked several more times with writer Richard Curtis and Duncan Kenworthy. The three teamed together on two more successful films, Notting Hill (1999) and Love Actually (2003). Producer: Tim Bevan, Richard Curtis, Eric Fellner, Duncan Kenworthy Director: Mike Newell Screenplay: Richard Curtis Cinematography: Michael Coulter Film Editing: Jon Gregory Art Direction: Maggie Gray Music: Richard Rodney Bennett Cast: Hugh Grant (Charles), Andie MacDowell (Carrie), Kristin Scott Thomas (Fiona), James Fleet (Tom), Simon Callow (Gareth), Charlotte Coleman (Scarlett). C-117m. Letterboxed. by Andrea Passafiume

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Duncan Kenworthy was nominated for the 1994 Golden Laurel Award by the Producers Guild of America.

Mike Newell was nominated for outstanding directorial achievement by the Directors Guild of America (1994).

Nominated for the 1994 Golden Reel Award by the Motion Picture Sound Editors in the foreign film category.

Richard Curtis won the 1994 award for Best Original Screenplay from the Writers Guild of America (WGA).

Winner of four 1994 British Academy of Film and Television Arts (BAFTA) Awards, including Best Picture, Best Director, Best Actor (Hugh Grant), and Best Supporting Actress (Kristin Scott Thomas). Also nominated for Best Original Screenplay, Best Supporting Actress (Charlotte Coleman), Best Supporting Actor (Simon Callow and John Hannah), Best Music, Best Costume Design, and Best Editing.

Winner of the 1994 Australian Film Institute Award for best foreign film.

Winner of the 1994 Cesar Award for best foreign film.

Expanded Release in United States April 15, 1994

Expanded Release in United States April 22, 1994

Expanded Release in United States April 8, 1994

Expanded Release in United States March 18, 1994

Expanded Release in United States March 25, 1994

Expanded Release in United States March 31, 1994

Released in United States 1994

Released in United States April 1994

Released in United States January 1994

Released in United States March 1994

Released in United States May 1994

Released in United States on Video August 24, 1994

Released in United States Spring March 9, 1994

Shown at Cannes Film Festival (market) May 12-23, 1994.

Shown at Cleveland International Film Festival (opening night) April 7-17, 1994.

Shown at Santa Barbara International Film Festival March 4-13, 1994.

Shown at Tokyo International Film Festival September 24 - October 2, 1994.

Began shooting May 28, 1993.

Released in United States 1994 (Shown at Tokyo International Film Festival September 24 - October 2, 1994.)

Released in United States January 1994 (Shown at Sundance Film Festival (Opening Night) in Park City, Utah January 20-30, 1994.)

Released in United States March 1994 (Shown at Santa Barbara International Film Festival March 4-13, 1994.)

Released in United States Spring March 9, 1994

Expanded Release in United States March 18, 1994

Expanded Release in United States March 25, 1994

Expanded Release in United States March 31, 1994

Released in United States April 1994 (Shown at Cleveland International Film Festival (opening night) April 7-17, 1994.)

Expanded Release in United States April 8, 1994

Expanded Release in United States April 15, 1994

Expanded Release in United States April 22, 1994

Released in United States May 1994 (Shown at Cannes Film Festival (market) May 12-23, 1994.)

Released in United States on Video August 24, 1994

Completed shooting July 9, 1993.