Dancing Feet


1h 10m 1936

Film Details

Release Date
Jan 31, 1936
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Republic Pictures Corp.
Distribution Company
Republic Pictures Corp.
Country
United States
Screenplay Information
Based on the novel Dancing Feet by Rob Eden (New York, 1931).

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 10m
Film Length
6,469ft (8 reels)

Synopsis

Millionaire social scion Silas P. Jones throws a party for his granddaughter Judy in the hope that she will prefer another young man to her boyfriend, Peyton Wells, whom Silas cannot tolerate. Peyton arrives anyway, and after he breaks up the party, the youngsters go to Dreamland, a local dance hall, where handsome Jimmy Cassidy mistakes Judy for a new hostess. Judy treats it as a game, but after Jimmy leaves, she must return home to face Silas' wrath. Silas warns Judy that he will disinherit her if she does not stop seeing Peyton, and so the headstrong Judy goes to Peyton's apartment to ask him to marry her. He turns her down, however, after which Judy checks into the Courtly Plaza, where the hotel manager becomes suspicious of her. He calls Silas the next morning to confirm Judy's identity, but the vengeful Silas tells him that the girl is an imposter. Jimmy, who began work at the Plaza that morning, overhears the proceedings and warns Judy, then helps her escape and pays her bill before he is fired for assisting her. Judy returns to Dreamland, where hostess Mabel Henry convinces the owner, Phil Moore, to give her a job, after which Mabel invites Judy to stay with her. A few nights later, Peyton comes to the dance hall and asks Judy to marry him, but she tells him that she likes being independent. Judy introduces Peyton to Jimmy, and Peyton's rudeness prompts a fistfight, for which Judy receives the blame. Jimmy tells Judy that he spent his night school tuition on her hotel bill, and as she thanks him, Silas finds her and gets her fired. The discouraged couple retreat to Mabel's apartment to commiserate, and Jimmy tells Judy about his idea to teach tap dancing over the radio and through books that his show would advertise. Judy enthusiastically endorses the idea and, when Jimmy cannot get financial backing, she appeals to Peyton, who goes to radio station manager Oliver Groves for help. Groves agrees to give Jimmy's show a try, but when Silas finds out, he threatens to close his advertising account with the station unless Groves cancels Jimmy's broadcast. Believing that his show, called "Dr. Cassidy's Dance School of the Air," is being broadcast, Jimmy gives an excellent performance, but later that afternoon, Mabel tells him that it was pre-empted. Peyton informs them that it was Silas' doing, and Jimmy, unaware that Silas is Judy's grandfather, rushes to his office. Silas crushes Jimmy's hopes for a romance with Judy by telling him that she is using him and that she intends to marry Peyton. Judy and Peyton, meanwhile, have convinced Phil to allow Jimmy to present his show on the Dreamland Hour. When Judy returns to Mabel's apartment, however, she discovers that Jimmy has told Mabel Silas' tale that Judy is slumming by associating with them. The three quarrel, and after Judy leaves, Mabel agrees to take her place on Jimmy's show. Back at Silas' mansion, Silas realizes that Judy and Jimmy are really in love and takes matters into his own hands by sending a romantic telegram to Judy, but signed by Jimmy. Judy rushes to Dreamland, arriving just in time for her cue. The show is a big hit, and the dancing sweethearts are reunited.

Film Details

Release Date
Jan 31, 1936
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Republic Pictures Corp.
Distribution Company
Republic Pictures Corp.
Country
United States
Screenplay Information
Based on the novel Dancing Feet by Rob Eden (New York, 1931).

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 10m
Film Length
6,469ft (8 reels)

Quotes

Trivia

Notes

According to Hollywood Reporter news items, M. H. Hoffman had originally prepared this film for production, presumably for Liberty Pictures Corp., before its consolidation into Republic earlier in 1935. The exact nature of his participation in the final film has not been determined. Hollywood Reporter also noted that Mel Brown was signed to direct the picture, and that George Waggner and Lee Freeman worked on the script. The writers' contribution to the completed film, however, has not been confirmed. According to modern sources, Louise Brooks was tested for a role in the picture. Dancing Feet was remade by Republic in 1940 as Melody and Moonlight. Although author Rob Eden is not credited in the later film, Dave Silverstein is credited with "original story" for both pictures.