Bright Young Things


1h 45m 2004

Brief Synopsis

A portrait of a fast, furious, and decadent era that follows the exploits of a group of young aristocrats, slavishly followed by the tabloid press, who refer to them as "bright young things." At the center of the circle is Adam, who runs with a pack of glittering socialites; he embrace every innovat

Film Details

MPAA Rating
Release Date
2004
Production Company
Action Cars Ltd; Andy Dixon Facilities; Angel Studios; Angels the Costumiers; Bellwood Media; Bickers Action; Blowup; Derek Townshend; Edit Hire; Film Finances, Inc.; Filmfour International; Filmfour International; Framestore Cfc; Icon Uk Group; Isobel Griffiths, Ltd.; Lee & Thompson; Midnight Transfer; Revolution Films; Sapex; Sargent Disc, Ltd.; Set Meals; Set Wheels; The Works; The Works; U.K. Film Council; Videosonics Cinema Sound; Visionview Productions
Distribution Company
ThinkFilm; Icon; Icon Uk Group; Kinepolis Film Distribution; New Line Home Entertainment; RCV Distribution; Ster-Kinekor; Thinkfilm

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 45m

Synopsis

A portrait of a fast, furious, and decadent era that follows the exploits of a group of young aristocrats, slavishly followed by the tabloid press, who refer to them as "bright young things." At the center of the circle is Adam, who runs with a pack of glittering socialites; he embrace every innovation and vice in a breathless attempt to be "modern." Adam, who is well-connected but totally broke, is trying to get enough money to marry his beautiful, bored fiancée, Nina. While his increasingly outlandish schemes to raise cash are constantly thwarted, the party going-and-throwing crowd seems to self-destruct, one by one, in an endless search for newer and faster sensations. Finally, when--out of their control--events come crashing into their world, the "bright young things" are forced to reassess their lives and reconsider what they really value most.

Crew

Niall Acott

Music

Tim Alban

Dubbing Mixer

Nicola Armstrong

Post-Production Coordinator

Chris Auty

Executive Producer

Matt Bacon

Props

Joshua Meath Baker

Graphics Coordinator

Paul Bale

Painter

Howard Bargroff

Dubbing Mixer

Guy Barker

Production Accountant

Ken Barnie

Song Performer

Mat Bartram

Music

Ian Bee

Construction

Barry Bellotti

Generator Operator

Jonny Benson

Assistant Director

Sarah J Berry

Makeup

Michael Billimore

Driver

Pete Blackall

Props

Owen Bleasdale

Foley Editor

Owen Bleasdale

Foley Recordist

Lucy Bonamy

Makeup

Henry Braham

Director Of Photography

Perry Brahan

Special Effects Technician

Marsha Bramwell

Editing

Wendy Brazington

Casting

Matthew Broderick

Props

Henry Brookes

Driver

Chris Brough

Construction

Darnell Brown

Executive

Lindsay Brunnock

Art Director

Ed Bulman

Adr

Corina Burrough

Props Buyer

Andy Burrows

Film Lab

Gianluca Buttari

Adr/Dialogue Editor

Darren Capper

Video Assist/Playback

Gina Carter

Producer

David Chettleborough

Construction

David Chisholm

Props

James Clarke

Film Lab

James Clarke

Film Lab

John Claude

Film Lab

Martin Clay

Driver

Rebecca Cole

Makeup

George Cottle

Stunts

Noel Coward

Song Performer

Noel Coward

Song

Clare Crean

Executive

Jo Crocker

Assistant

Pat Cronin

Rigging Electrician

Gary Cross

Rigging Gaffer

Gary Cross

Best Boy

Baron Cullis

Driver

Harry Da Costa

Song

Graham Alec Dale

Props

Shane Davey

Driver

Adrian Davies

Driver

James Davis

Special Effects Technician

Miranda Davis

Producer

Graham Day

Sound Department

Jim Dowdall

Stunts

Milton Drake

Song

Anne Dudley

Original Music

Anne Dudley

Music

Anne Dudley

Song

Roger Dudley

Music Producer

Kevin Early

Location Assistant

Claire Eastman

Choreographer

Graham Easton

Other

Andrew Eaton

Executive Producer

Caroline Ede

Costumes

Nic Ede

Costume Designer

Edwin B Edwards

Song

Edward Elgar

Song

Duke Ellington

Song

Karen Elliott

Music Supervisor

Louis Elman

Adr Voice Casting

Roy Elston

Rigging Electrician

Glyn Evans

Construction

Michael Eve

Caterer

Sarah Jane Facer

Legal Services

Kimberly Fahey

Art Department

Sammy Fain

Song

Judy Farr

Set Decorator

Camilla Fiddian-green

Assistant Costume Designer

Steve Finn

Sound Engineer

Alan Flying

Wardrobe

John R Foster

Camera Focus Puller

Heidi Freeman

Assistant Editor

Stephen Fry

Executive Producer

Stephen Fry

Song

Stephen Fry

Screenwriter

Len Furssedonn

Driver

Pat Garrett

Key Grip

Jeremy Gawade

Legal Services

Simon Gershon

Supervising Sound Editor

A Harrington Gibbs

Song

Colin Giffin

Driver

Renata Gilbert

Makeup

Juliette Gill

Executive

Adam Glasman

Colorist

Dean Glenn

Driver

Paul Gooch

Makeup

Ann Marie Gormley

Accounting Assistant

Fiona Gosden

Assistant Director

James Grant

Location Manager

Colin Gray

Props

Jim Greenhorn

Sound Mixer

Christine Greenwood

Makeup

Joe Grey

Song

Darren Grosch

Electrician

Georgina Gunner

Costumes

Steve Haines

Driver

Cordelia Hardy

Assistant Director

Jane Harwood

Assistant Art Director

David Haynes

Construction

John Haynes

Construction

Caroline Hewitt

Co-Producer

Al Hoffman

Song

Mark Holt

Special Effects Supervisor

Alistair Hopkins

Post-Production Supervisor

Tony Hoskins

Construction

Michael Howells

Production Designer

Lynne Huitson

Art Director

Nigel Hulme

Driver

Caroline Hume

Costumes

Josh Hyams

Stand-In

Ali James

Location Assistant

Tom Jeakins

Driver

Irving Kahal

Song

Skaila Kanga

Song Performer

Rebecca Kearey

Executive

James Keaton

Production

Nick Kelly

Driver

John Kemp

Driver

Dean Kennedy

Electrician

Albert W Ketelbey

Song

Giles Keyte

Photography

Peter Swords King

Makeup

Rachel Kitten

Executive

Charles Knill-jones

Driver

Alexandra Kosevic

Production Coordinator

Melissa Lake

Foley Artist

Stephen Langley

Electrician

Doug Lankston

Props

Melissa Layton-skorepa

Costumes

Richard Lever

Legal Services

Jerry Livingston

Song

Rudolph Lukesch

Song

Andrew Mackenna

Song Performer

Alex Mackie

Editor

Julian Majzub

Driver

Steve Marquiss

Construction

Annette Lyton Mason

Stunt Double

Nick Mason

Driver

Paula Mcbreen

Production Manager

Gerard Mccann

Music Editor

Charles Mcdonald

Publicity

Claire Mcgrane

Film Lab

Ben Meechan

Sound Editor

Ray Meere

Loader

Linda Mellin

Costumes

Alexi Michael

Construction

Graham Mitchell

Construction

Valentino Musetti

Stunt Coordinator

Mitch Niclas

Props

Heather Noble

Assistant Production Coordinator

Bernard O'reilly

Adr Editor

Paul Oakman

Construction

Marcus Oliver

Song Performer

Marcus Oliver

Dubbing Mixer

Andy Ordonez

Business Affairs

Gerioli Organ

Song Performer

Andrew Orr

Executive

John Palmer

Props

Sue Parkinson

Makeup

Melissa Parmenter

Assistant

Adam Parry

Titles

Steve Payne

Props

Annie Penn

Script Supervisor

Matthew Penry-davey

Assistant Director

Neil Peplow

Executive Producer

Aline Perry

Executive

Mick Peter

Driver

Laura Phillips

Publicity

Elissa Phipps

Assistant

Dominic Pike

Construction

David Pinnington

Location Manager

Allen Polley

Property Master

Dan Precious

Office Runner

Steve Price

Music

Louis Prima

Song

Miles Proudfoot

Loader

H. W. Ragas

Song

Larry Randall

Gaffer

Jeanette Redmond

Makeup

Jim Reeve

Executive Producer

Ben Renton

Assistant Editor

David Reynolds

Caterer

Martyn Richmond

Office Runner

Steve Robbins

Executive Producer

Keith Roberts

Camera Focus Puller

Film Details

MPAA Rating
Release Date
2004
Production Company
Action Cars Ltd; Andy Dixon Facilities; Angel Studios; Angels the Costumiers; Bellwood Media; Bickers Action; Blowup; Derek Townshend; Edit Hire; Film Finances, Inc.; Filmfour International; Filmfour International; Framestore Cfc; Icon Uk Group; Isobel Griffiths, Ltd.; Lee & Thompson; Midnight Transfer; Revolution Films; Sapex; Sargent Disc, Ltd.; Set Meals; Set Wheels; The Works; The Works; U.K. Film Council; Videosonics Cinema Sound; Visionview Productions
Distribution Company
ThinkFilm; Icon; Icon Uk Group; Kinepolis Film Distribution; New Line Home Entertainment; RCV Distribution; Ster-Kinekor; Thinkfilm

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 45m

Articles

Sir John Mills (1908-2005)


He was arguably the most refined, and versatile of all English film stars in the history of British cinema. Sir John Mills, the Oscar®-winning actor whose film career spanned over 70 years, died on April 23 of natural causes in London. He was 97.

Born Lewis Ernest Watts Mills in Norfolk, England on February 22, 1908. His father was a headmaster of a village school in Suffolk, where Mills was raised. After secondary school, he worked as a clerk in a corn merchant's office while acting in amateur dramatic societies. Ever ambitious, he relocated to London in 1928 to find more work as an actor.

He took tap-dancing lessons and made his stage debut as a chorus boy in The Five O'Clock Girl at the London Hippodrome in 1929. Later that year, he joined an acting troupe that toured India and the Far East with a repertory of modern plays, musical comedies and Shakespeare. It was during this tour when he scored his big break - he was spotted by Noel Coward while in Singapore and promptly taken under the playwright's wing when he returned to London in 1931.

On his return, he starred on the West End (London's Broadway), in Coward's Cavalcade and earned the lead in a production of Charley's Aunt. His song and dance talents came in handy for his film debut, an early British musical-comedy The Midshipmaid (1932). His biggest hits over the next few years would all fall into the genre of light comic-musicals: Britannia of Billingsgate (1933), Royal Cavalcade (1935), and Four Dark Hours(1937). He scored a his first big part as Robert Donat's student in the MGM backed production Mills went on to play Robert Donat's Goodbye, Mr. Chips (1939). He developed some more heft to his acting credentials that same year when he made his debut at the celebrated Old Vic Theatre as Puck in A Midsummer Night's Dream.

He served briefly in the Navy, 1940-41, during World War II before receiving a medical discharge. When Mills returned to the screen, he began a great turn as the atypical sturdy, dignified Englishman ("English without tears" went the popular phrase of the day). He starred as a stalwart lead in a amazing string of hit films: In Which We Serve (1942), We Dive at Dawn (1943), This Happy Breed (1944), The Way to the Stars (1945), and Waterloo Road (1945). Although Mills was ever dependable, they did not show his breakout talents until he starred as Pip in David Lean's gorgeous adaptation of Charles Dickens' Great Expectations (1946). As the young orphan who morphs into a man of wealth and stature, Mills showed the depth as an actor by offering a finely modulated performance.

By the late '40s, Mills was a bona fide star of British films, and over the next decade the strong roles kept coming: as the ill-fated Robert Falcon Scott in Scott of the Antarctic (1948); Bassett, the handy man who tries to help a troubled child (the brilliant John Howard Davies) of greedy, neglectful parents in the superb domestic drama The Rocking Horse Winner (1950); an overprotective father who gets trapped in a murder yarn in Mr. Denning Drives North (1952); a fine Willie Mossop in David Lean's Hobson's Choice (1954); an impressive "against-type" performance as a Russian peasant in War and Peace (1956); a sympathetic police inspector coaxing the trust of a juvenile (his daughter Hayley) who knows the facts of a murder case in the underappreciated Tiger Bay (1959); a rowdy Australian sheep shearer in Summer of the Seventeenth Doll (also 1959); and arguably his finest performance - a Best Actor award at the Venice Film Festival for a hard-as-nails army colonel who fears the loss of control over his regiment in Tunes of Glory (1960).

The mid-60s saw an isolated effort as a film director: Gypsy Girl (which starred his other daughter Juliet - who would later find fame on US television in Nanny and the Professor (1970-72); and showed the development of Mills into a charming character actor: the working-class patriarch in the modest comedy The Family Way (starring Hayley as his daughter); and a terrific comic bit as a murderous Lord who tries to kill off his kin for the family inheritance in Bryan Forbes The Wrong Box (all 1966).

By the '70s, his film work slowed considerably, but he was always worth watching: an Oscar winning performance as a mute villager in David Lean¿s study of the Irish troubles Ryan's Daughter (1970); as the influential General Herbert Kitchener Young Winston (1972); and as a driven oil driller in Oklahoma Crude (1973). With the exception of a small role in Sir Richard Attenborough's Ghandi (1982 - where he was credited as Sir John Mills after his knighthood in 1976), and a regrettable cameo in the deplorable Madonna comedy Who's That Girl (1987).

Very little was seen of Mills until recent years, where the most memorable of his appearances included: Old Norway in Hamlet (1996); as the stern chairman opposite Rowan Atkinson in the hit comedy Bean (1997); and - in a daring final role for his proud career - a nonagenarian partygoing cocaine user in Stephen Fry's bawdy social satire Bright Young Things (2003)! Mills is survived by his wife of 64 years, the novelist and playwright Mary Hayley Bell; his daughters, Juliet and Hayley; son, John; and several grandchildren.

by Michael T. Toole
Sir John Mills (1908-2005)

Sir John Mills (1908-2005)

He was arguably the most refined, and versatile of all English film stars in the history of British cinema. Sir John Mills, the Oscar®-winning actor whose film career spanned over 70 years, died on April 23 of natural causes in London. He was 97. Born Lewis Ernest Watts Mills in Norfolk, England on February 22, 1908. His father was a headmaster of a village school in Suffolk, where Mills was raised. After secondary school, he worked as a clerk in a corn merchant's office while acting in amateur dramatic societies. Ever ambitious, he relocated to London in 1928 to find more work as an actor. He took tap-dancing lessons and made his stage debut as a chorus boy in The Five O'Clock Girl at the London Hippodrome in 1929. Later that year, he joined an acting troupe that toured India and the Far East with a repertory of modern plays, musical comedies and Shakespeare. It was during this tour when he scored his big break - he was spotted by Noel Coward while in Singapore and promptly taken under the playwright's wing when he returned to London in 1931. On his return, he starred on the West End (London's Broadway), in Coward's Cavalcade and earned the lead in a production of Charley's Aunt. His song and dance talents came in handy for his film debut, an early British musical-comedy The Midshipmaid (1932). His biggest hits over the next few years would all fall into the genre of light comic-musicals: Britannia of Billingsgate (1933), Royal Cavalcade (1935), and Four Dark Hours(1937). He scored a his first big part as Robert Donat's student in the MGM backed production Mills went on to play Robert Donat's Goodbye, Mr. Chips (1939). He developed some more heft to his acting credentials that same year when he made his debut at the celebrated Old Vic Theatre as Puck in A Midsummer Night's Dream. He served briefly in the Navy, 1940-41, during World War II before receiving a medical discharge. When Mills returned to the screen, he began a great turn as the atypical sturdy, dignified Englishman ("English without tears" went the popular phrase of the day). He starred as a stalwart lead in a amazing string of hit films: In Which We Serve (1942), We Dive at Dawn (1943), This Happy Breed (1944), The Way to the Stars (1945), and Waterloo Road (1945). Although Mills was ever dependable, they did not show his breakout talents until he starred as Pip in David Lean's gorgeous adaptation of Charles Dickens' Great Expectations (1946). As the young orphan who morphs into a man of wealth and stature, Mills showed the depth as an actor by offering a finely modulated performance. By the late '40s, Mills was a bona fide star of British films, and over the next decade the strong roles kept coming: as the ill-fated Robert Falcon Scott in Scott of the Antarctic (1948); Bassett, the handy man who tries to help a troubled child (the brilliant John Howard Davies) of greedy, neglectful parents in the superb domestic drama The Rocking Horse Winner (1950); an overprotective father who gets trapped in a murder yarn in Mr. Denning Drives North (1952); a fine Willie Mossop in David Lean's Hobson's Choice (1954); an impressive "against-type" performance as a Russian peasant in War and Peace (1956); a sympathetic police inspector coaxing the trust of a juvenile (his daughter Hayley) who knows the facts of a murder case in the underappreciated Tiger Bay (1959); a rowdy Australian sheep shearer in Summer of the Seventeenth Doll (also 1959); and arguably his finest performance - a Best Actor award at the Venice Film Festival for a hard-as-nails army colonel who fears the loss of control over his regiment in Tunes of Glory (1960). The mid-60s saw an isolated effort as a film director: Gypsy Girl (which starred his other daughter Juliet - who would later find fame on US television in Nanny and the Professor (1970-72); and showed the development of Mills into a charming character actor: the working-class patriarch in the modest comedy The Family Way (starring Hayley as his daughter); and a terrific comic bit as a murderous Lord who tries to kill off his kin for the family inheritance in Bryan Forbes The Wrong Box (all 1966). By the '70s, his film work slowed considerably, but he was always worth watching: an Oscar winning performance as a mute villager in David Lean¿s study of the Irish troubles Ryan's Daughter (1970); as the influential General Herbert Kitchener Young Winston (1972); and as a driven oil driller in Oklahoma Crude (1973). With the exception of a small role in Sir Richard Attenborough's Ghandi (1982 - where he was credited as Sir John Mills after his knighthood in 1976), and a regrettable cameo in the deplorable Madonna comedy Who's That Girl (1987). Very little was seen of Mills until recent years, where the most memorable of his appearances included: Old Norway in Hamlet (1996); as the stern chairman opposite Rowan Atkinson in the hit comedy Bean (1997); and - in a daring final role for his proud career - a nonagenarian partygoing cocaine user in Stephen Fry's bawdy social satire Bright Young Things (2003)! Mills is survived by his wife of 64 years, the novelist and playwright Mary Hayley Bell; his daughters, Juliet and Hayley; son, John; and several grandchildren. by Michael T. Toole

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States Summer August 20, 2004

Released in United States September 10, 2004

Released in United States on Video February 8, 2005

Released in United States January 2004

Based on Evelyn Waugh's 1930's classic novel, "Vile Bodies".

Fujicolor, Technicolor

Released in United States Summer August 20, 2004

Released in United States September 10, 2004 (Los Angeles)

Released in United States on Video February 8, 2005

Released in United States January 2004 (Shown at Sundance Film Festival (Premiere) January 15-25, 2004.)