Hot Water


58m 1937

Film Details

Also Known As
The Jones Family in Hot Water, The Jones Family in Politics, The Jones Family in Too Much Limelight, Too Much Limelight
Release Date
Sep 24, 1937
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corp.
Distribution Company
Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corp.
Country
United States
Location
Los Angeles--Griffith Park, California, United States
Screenplay Information
Based on the characters created by Katharine Kavanaugh.

Technical Specs

Duration
58m
Film Length
5,277 or 5,300ft (6 reels)

Synopsis

At a council meeting for the town of Maryville, Jack Jones arrives and tells his father, John Jones, that he just stopped at the Red Mill cocktail bar for a burger, a place that had earlier been raided for illegal gambling practices. Distressed that his son has innocently frequented such a house of vice, Jones gives a moving speech about the imperative to clean up Maryville. The meeting attendees agree and nominate the hesitant Jones for mayor. As Jones gives another speech on the radio about the iniquities of the Red Mill, Hal Lynch, the bar's owner, and Mayor Roberts discuss the prudence of closing the bar during the race. Lynch reminds Roberts where his campaign funds come from, and the two decide that the campaign needs the bar's proceeds. Jones later discovers that the Red Mill is owned by a Caleb Stone, Roberts' cousin, who is in the poor house, and this connection implicates Roberts in the bar's ownership. Roger, Jack's younger brother, overhears his father and mother discussing Roberts' ownership of the bar and prints the story in his little newspaper, The Maryville Tattler . Roger distributes the papers to a crowd of moviegoers, and when Jack sees the story, he tells Roger to retrieve the newspapers or risk endangering his father's campaign. A reporter for a Maryville daily refuses to return his copy, however, and rewrites the story for his own paper. Lynch, after reading the story, gets Bebe Montaine, a cocktail waitress at the Red Mill, to lure Jack to the bar by pretending that her car has broken down. After Jack takes her to the Red Mill and drives away, Lynch sends a henchman, Walter Whittaker, to swerve into Jack's car on the highway. The police arrive and discover in Jack's car a bottle of liquor that Lynch's men had earlier planted. Whittaker is taken to the hospital and pronounced paralyzed from the waist down. Roger deduces from oil spots and tire marks that Whittaker had been lying in wait for Jack's car and that he is now faking his illness. He goes to the hospital with a box of hornets wrapped up as candy, and when the hornets fly out of the box, Whittaker runs screaming into an officer's arms. Roger and Jack pull Whittaker up on a platform, where Roberts and others make campaign speeches, and Whittaker confesses that Lynch and Roberts framed Jack. Roberts runs away, presumably in resignation, and Jones' election as Mayor of Maryville is announced.

Film Details

Also Known As
The Jones Family in Hot Water, The Jones Family in Politics, The Jones Family in Too Much Limelight, Too Much Limelight
Release Date
Sep 24, 1937
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corp.
Distribution Company
Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corp.
Country
United States
Location
Los Angeles--Griffith Park, California, United States
Screenplay Information
Based on the characters created by Katharine Kavanaugh.

Technical Specs

Duration
58m
Film Length
5,277 or 5,300ft (6 reels)

Quotes

Trivia

Notes

The plot summary was based on a screen continuity at the USC Cinema-Television Library, and the onscreen credits were taken from a screen credit sheet in the Twentieth Century-Fox Records of the Legal Department at the UCLA Theater Arts Library. The working titles of this film were The Jones Family in Politics, Too Much Limelight and The Jones Family in Too Much Limelight. This film was also known as The Jones Family in Hot Water. According to the legal records, Ron Ferguson and Eleanor De Lamater, who received screen credit for original story, based their treatment on an original story by Paul Burger, who did not receive screen credit. The legal records also note that the exterior of the Jones family home was filmed at 844 5th Avenue in Los Angeles and that filming of the automobile accident was shot at night in Griffith Park in Los Angeles. For information about the series, please see the entry above for Every Saturday Night.