The First Wives Club


1h 45m 1996
The First Wives Club

Brief Synopsis

Marriage has turned into a crash dive for Brenda Morelli Cushman, Elise Elliot Atchison and Annie MacDuggan Paradise. These three well-heeled Manhattanites were chums during their college days, but they all took different paths. Brenda married an electronics-emporium magnate, Elise became a film sta

Film Details

Also Known As
First Wives Club, Före detta fruars klubb, club des ex
MPAA Rating
Release Date
1996
Distribution Company
Paramount Pictures
Location
New York City, New York, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 45m

Synopsis

Marriage has turned into a crash dive for Brenda Morelli Cushman, Elise Elliot Atchison and Annie MacDuggan Paradise. These three well-heeled Manhattanites were chums during their college days, but they all took different paths. Brenda married an electronics-emporium magnate, Elise became a film star, Annie an Upper East Side housewife. They all helped their husbands build up hugely successful businesses. Now they're reunited by catastrophe: Each has just been callously dumped by her husband in exchange for a younger, sexier "trophy wife." There are sharks swimming around Manhattan, and most of them are pumped with silicone and squeezed into Spandex. Smarting from the pain, Brenda, Elise and Annie join forces and concoct a plan to exact the most exquisitely bitter vengeance upon their "exes." War has been declared, and it will claim some of Manhattan's poshest boardrooms and bedrooms as its battlefields. The First Wives Club is now in session. These are three ladies you do not want to mess with.

Crew

Noah Ackerman

Associate Producer

Michael Adkins

Costume Supervisor

Theoni V. Aldredge

Costume Designer

Ray Angelic

Production Coordinator

Jeff Atmajian

Original Music

Ed Barteski

Adr Editor

Charley Beal

Art Director

Frank Bennett

Original Music

Patricia Birch

Choreographer

Steven A Blaho

Grip

John Bloom

Editor

Julie A. Bloom

Assistant Director

Bob Bornstein

Music

Todd Scott Brody

Post-Production Supervisor

Michael Brown

Electrician

Kenneth J Burke

Dolly Grip

Ronald J. Burke

Grip

Nancy Cabrera

Foley Artist

Antonia Calzetti

Craft Service

Marcus Canty

Production Auditor

Marilyn Carbone

Makeup

Brian Carmichael

Video Assist/Playback

Shari Carpenter

Script Supervisor

Tom Case

Makeup

Jonathan Cerullo

Choreographer

Ed Check

Assistant Art Director

Richard P. Cirincione

Sound Editor

Laura Civiello

Sound Editor

Cheryl E Compton

Other

Lorenzo Contessa

Storyboard Artist

Kathleen Corgan

Assistant Location Manager

Alan D'angerio

Hair Stylist

Sandy De Crescent

Other

Jerry Deblau

Lighting Technician

Brad Dechter

Original Music

Felice Diamond

Makeup

Lee Dichter

Rerecording

Frank Didio

Carpenter

Natalie N. Dorset

Production Assistant

James Edmiston

Grip

Armando Fente

Assistant

John Ford

Grip

Ralph Fratianni

Grip

Susan Fried

Location Assistant

John Fundus

Boom Operator

Lauren Gale

Craft Service

Gilbert Gertsen

On-Set Dresser

Kathie Lee Gifford

Other

Jack Gill

Stunt Coordinator

Peter Girolami

Electrician

Wendy Goidell

Other

Olivia Goldsmith

Source Material (From Novel)

Anamarie Gonzaga

Production Auditor

Vincent Guarriello

Construction

Louis J Guerra

Production Assistant

Robert S Hahn

Camera Operator

Steven R Hammond

Transportation Captain

Ron Haney

Wardrobe Assistant

Robert Harling

Screenplay

Jill Hattersley

Assistant

Thomas J Heilig

Transportation Co-Captain

George Henfling

Location Assistant

Bill Henry

Lighting

Julia Hickman

Art Department Coordinator

John Hill

Assistant

Bradford L Hohle

Consultant

Eric Hoivik

Camera Trainee

Elizabeth Holder

Production Assistant

Deloris Horn

Assistant

Joseph Iberti

Location Manager

Thomas Imperato

Coproducer

Kenton Jakub

Adr Editor

Carl L Johnson

Location Assistant

Lori Johnson

Assistant Property Master

Martin Jones

Grip

Artie Kane

Music Conductor

Mick Kelly

Production Assistant

Paul D Kelly

Assistant Art Director

Jay Kessel

Assistant Sound Editor

Bruce Kitzmeyer

Foley Editor

Ed Koch

Other

Scott Koenig

Assistant

David Kramer

Voice Casting

Peter Kurland

Sound

Wallace G Lane

Assistant Costume Designer

George Lara

Foley

Peter Larkin

Production Designer

David B Leener

Rights & Clearances

Nancy Lefkowitz

Production Assistant

Angela Levin

Makeup

Gary Levitsky

On-Set Dresser

Heather Locklear

Other

Tommy Louie

Other

David Lowry

Dolly Grip

Allan Mader

Electrician

Bobby Mancuso

Photography

Brian R Mannain

Scenic Artist

Brick Mason

Storyboard Artist

Frances Mathias

Hair

Bernadette Mazur

Makeup Artist

Steve Mcauliff

Animal Trainer

Matt Mccarthy

On-Set Dresser

James Mccullagh

Electrician

Jane Mcculley

Adr Editor

Heather Neely Mcquarrie

Associate Producer

Peter A Mian

Video Assist/Playback

Eytan Mirsky

Sound Editor

Kim Miscia

Casting Associate

Octovio Molina

Property Master

Jose Gilberto Molinari-rosaly

Dga Trainee

Christine Moosher

Assistant Set Decorator

Carmen More

Assistant

Fred Muller

Electrician

Len Murach

Location Assistant

Tim Norman

Photography

Jon Oshima

Propman

John Panuccio

Grip

Mike Papadoulos

Electrician

Francesca Paris

Hair

Stanley Pasay

Scenic Artist

Noelle Penraat

Negative Cutting

Craig Perry

Associate Producer

Ron Petagna

Construction Coordinator

Louis Petraglia

Electrician

Peter John Petraglia

Lighting

Thomas J. Prate

Grip

Noah Prince

Electrician

Joseph Proscia

On-Set Dresser

Philip A Ramos

Production Assistant

Robert Ramos

Hair

Nic Ratner

Music Editor

Justine Rendall

Consultant

Bill Robinson

Assistant

Leslie Rollins

Set Decorator

Scott Rudin

Producer

Patrick Russ

Original Music

Tom Salvatore

Color Timer

Kristen Sampsell

Craft Service

Dennis Sands

Music

Alex Sanger

Assistant

Suzanne Santry

Assistant

Maurice Schell

Sound Editor

Adam Schroeder

Executive Producer

Andy Schwartz

Photography

Jeffrey Seeds

Production Assistant

Marc Shaiman

Music Supervisor

Marc Shaiman

Music

Werner Sherer

Hair

Michael Sibley

Location Assistant

Audrey Soodoo-raphael

Production Assistant

Mark Sourian

Assistant

Stuart Stanley

Foley Editor

Ilene Starger

Casting

Michael Steele

Assistant Director

Gloria Steinem

Other

Robert T Striem

Location Assistant

Ezra Swerdlow

Executive Producer

Ezra Swerdlow

Production Manager

Hartsell Taylor

Costume Supervisor

Yvette Taylor

Assistant

Richard Tenewitz

Carpenter

Donald E. Thorin

Director Of Photography

Donald E. Thorin

Other

Susan Towner

Production Auditor

Antonia Van Drimmelen

Associate Editor

Brian Vancho

Foley Artist

Nick Vidar

Music

Jimmy Vivino

Original Music

Matt Vogel

Special Effects Coordinator

Howard Weiner

Video Playback

Rosalie Wells

Wardrobe

Charles Whitney

Carpenter

Patty Willett

Assistant Production Coordinator

Pamela J Wise

Dresser

Brenda Yagmin

Craft Service

Tricia Yano

Assistant

Michael Zansky

Scenic Artist

Andy Zolot

Production Assistant

Film Details

Also Known As
First Wives Club, Före detta fruars klubb, club des ex
MPAA Rating
Release Date
1996
Distribution Company
Paramount Pictures
Location
New York City, New York, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 45m

Award Nominations

Best Score (Musical or Comedy)

1996

Articles

TCM Remembers - Eileen Heckart


TCM REMEMBERS EILEEN HECKART, DAVID SWIFT & PAUL LANDRES

Eileen Heckart, who won a Best Supporting Actress Oscar for Butterflies Are Free (1972), died December 31st at the age of 82. Heckart was born in 1919 in Columbus, Ohio and became interested in acting while in college. She moved to NYC in 1942, married her college boyfriend the following year (a marriage that lasted until his death in 1995) and started acting on stage. Soon she was appearing in live dramatic TV such as The Philco Television Playhouse and Studio One. Her first feature film appearance was as a waitress in Bus Stop (1956) but it was her role as a grieving mother in the following year's The Bad Seed that really attracted notice and an Oscar nomination for Best Supporting Actress. Heckart spent more time on Broadway and TV, making only occasional film appearances in Heller in Pink Tights (1960), No Way to Treat a Lady (1968) and Heartbreak Ridge (1986). She won one Emmy and was nominated for five others.

TCM REMEMBERS DAVID SWIFT, 1919-2001

Director David Swift died December 31st at the age of 82. Swift was best-known for the 1967 film version of the Broadway musical, How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying (he also appears in a cameo), Good Neighbor Sam (1964) starring Jack Lemmon and The Parent Trap (1961), all of which he also co-wrote. Swift was born in Minnesota but moved to California in the early 30s so he could work for Disney as an assistant animator, contributing to a string of classics from Dumbo (1941) to Fantasia (1940) to Snow White (1937). Swift also worked with madcap animator Tex Avery at MGM. He later became a TV and radio comedy writer and by the 1950s was directing episodes of TV series like Wagon Train, The Rifleman, Alfred Hitchcock Presents, Playhouse 90 and others. Swift also created Mr. Peepers (1952), one of TV's first hit series and a multiple Emmy nominee. Swift's first feature film was Pollyanna (1960) for which he recorded a DVD commentary last year. Swift twice received Writers Guild nominations for work on How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying and The Parent Trap.

TCM REMEMBERS PAUL LANDRES, 1912-2001

Prolific B-movie director Paul Landres died December 26th at the age of 89. Landres was born in New York City in 1912 but his family soon moved to Los Angeles where he grew up. He spent a couple of years attending UCLA before becoming an assistant editor at Universal in the 1931. He became a full editor in 1937, working on such films as Pittsburgh (1942) and I Shot Jesse James (1949). His first directorial effort was 1949's Grand Canyon but he soon became fast and reliable, alternating B-movies with TV episodes.. His best known films are Go, Johnny, Go! (1958) with appearances by Chuck Berry and Jackie Wilson, the moody The Return of Dracula (1958) and the 1957 cult favorite The Vampire. His TV credits run to some 350 episodes for such series as Adam 12, Bonanza, Death Valley Days and numerous others. Landres was co-founder in 1950 of the honorary society American Cinema Editors.

BUDD BOETTICHER 1916-2001

When director Budd Boetticher died on November 29th, American film lost another master. Though not a household name, Boetticher made crisp, tightly wound movies with more substance and emotional depth than was apparent at first glance. Instead of a flashy style, Boetticher preferred one imaginatively simple and almost elegant at times. Because of this approach films like The Tall T (1957), Decision at Sundown (1957), The Bullfighter and the Lady (1951) and Ride Lonesome (1960) have withstood the test of time while more blatantly ambitious films now seem like period pieces.

Budd was born Oscar Boetticher in Chicago on July 29th, 1916. With a father who sold hardware, Boetticher didn't come from a particularly artistic background. In college he boxed and played football before graduating and heading to Mexico to follow what's surely one of the most unusual ways to enter the film industry: as a professional matador. That's what led an old friend to get Boetticher hired as a bullfighting advisor on the 1941 version of Blood and Sand. Boetticher quickly took other small jobs in Hollywood before becoming an assistant director for films like Cover Girl. In 1944, he directed his first film, the Boston Blackie entry One Mysterious Night. Boetticher made a series of other B-movies, like the underrated film noir Behind Locked Doors (1948), through the rest of the decade.

Boetticher really hit his stride in the 50s when he began to get higher profile assignments, including the semi-autobiographical The Bullfighter and the Lady in 1951 which resulted in Boetticher's only Oscar nomination, for Best Writing. Sam Peckinpah later said he saw the film ten times. Other highlights of this period include Seminole (1953) (one of the first Hollywood films sympathetic to American Indians), the stylishly tight thriller The Killer Is Loose (1956) and the minor classic Horizons West (1952). In the late 50s, Boetticher also started directing TV episodes of series like Maverick and 77 Sunset Strip.

In 1956, Boetticher started a string of films that really established his reputation. These six Westerns starring Randolph Scott are known as the Ranown films after the production company named after Randolph Scott and producer Harry Joe Brown. Actually the first, Seven Men from Now (1956), was produced by a different company but all of them fit together, pushing the idea of the lone cowboy seeking revenge into new territory. The sharp Decision at Sundown twists Western cliche into one of the bleakest endings to slip through the Hollywood gates. The Tall T examines the genre's violent tendencies while Ride Lonesome and Buchanan Rides Alone (1958) have titles appropriate to their Beckett-like stories. The final film, Comanche Station, appeared in 1960.

That was the same year Boetticher made one of the best gangster films, The Rise and Fall of Legs Diamond, before watching everything fall apart. He and his wife decided to make a documentary about the famous matador Carlos Arruza and headed to Mexico. There Boetticher saw Arruza and much of the film crew die in an accident, almost died himself from an illness, separated from and divorced his wife (Debra Paget), and then spent time in various jails and even briefly a mental institution. This harrowing experience left him bankrupt but he still managed to complete the film, Arruza (1968), which gathered acclaim from the few who've been able to see it.

Boetticher managed to make just one more film, My Kingdom For... (1985), a self-reflexive documentary about raising Andalusian horses. He also made a cameo appearance in the Mel Gibson-Kurt Russell suspense thriller, Tequila Sunrise (1988). He died from complications from surgery at the age of 85.

By Lang Thompson

Tcm Remembers - Eileen Heckart

TCM Remembers - Eileen Heckart

TCM REMEMBERS EILEEN HECKART, DAVID SWIFT & PAUL LANDRES Eileen Heckart, who won a Best Supporting Actress Oscar for Butterflies Are Free (1972), died December 31st at the age of 82. Heckart was born in 1919 in Columbus, Ohio and became interested in acting while in college. She moved to NYC in 1942, married her college boyfriend the following year (a marriage that lasted until his death in 1995) and started acting on stage. Soon she was appearing in live dramatic TV such as The Philco Television Playhouse and Studio One. Her first feature film appearance was as a waitress in Bus Stop (1956) but it was her role as a grieving mother in the following year's The Bad Seed that really attracted notice and an Oscar nomination for Best Supporting Actress. Heckart spent more time on Broadway and TV, making only occasional film appearances in Heller in Pink Tights (1960), No Way to Treat a Lady (1968) and Heartbreak Ridge (1986). She won one Emmy and was nominated for five others. TCM REMEMBERS DAVID SWIFT, 1919-2001 Director David Swift died December 31st at the age of 82. Swift was best-known for the 1967 film version of the Broadway musical, How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying (he also appears in a cameo), Good Neighbor Sam (1964) starring Jack Lemmon and The Parent Trap (1961), all of which he also co-wrote. Swift was born in Minnesota but moved to California in the early 30s so he could work for Disney as an assistant animator, contributing to a string of classics from Dumbo (1941) to Fantasia (1940) to Snow White (1937). Swift also worked with madcap animator Tex Avery at MGM. He later became a TV and radio comedy writer and by the 1950s was directing episodes of TV series like Wagon Train, The Rifleman, Alfred Hitchcock Presents, Playhouse 90 and others. Swift also created Mr. Peepers (1952), one of TV's first hit series and a multiple Emmy nominee. Swift's first feature film was Pollyanna (1960) for which he recorded a DVD commentary last year. Swift twice received Writers Guild nominations for work on How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying and The Parent Trap. TCM REMEMBERS PAUL LANDRES, 1912-2001 Prolific B-movie director Paul Landres died December 26th at the age of 89. Landres was born in New York City in 1912 but his family soon moved to Los Angeles where he grew up. He spent a couple of years attending UCLA before becoming an assistant editor at Universal in the 1931. He became a full editor in 1937, working on such films as Pittsburgh (1942) and I Shot Jesse James (1949). His first directorial effort was 1949's Grand Canyon but he soon became fast and reliable, alternating B-movies with TV episodes.. His best known films are Go, Johnny, Go! (1958) with appearances by Chuck Berry and Jackie Wilson, the moody The Return of Dracula (1958) and the 1957 cult favorite The Vampire. His TV credits run to some 350 episodes for such series as Adam 12, Bonanza, Death Valley Days and numerous others. Landres was co-founder in 1950 of the honorary society American Cinema Editors. BUDD BOETTICHER 1916-2001 When director Budd Boetticher died on November 29th, American film lost another master. Though not a household name, Boetticher made crisp, tightly wound movies with more substance and emotional depth than was apparent at first glance. Instead of a flashy style, Boetticher preferred one imaginatively simple and almost elegant at times. Because of this approach films like The Tall T (1957), Decision at Sundown (1957), The Bullfighter and the Lady (1951) and Ride Lonesome (1960) have withstood the test of time while more blatantly ambitious films now seem like period pieces. Budd was born Oscar Boetticher in Chicago on July 29th, 1916. With a father who sold hardware, Boetticher didn't come from a particularly artistic background. In college he boxed and played football before graduating and heading to Mexico to follow what's surely one of the most unusual ways to enter the film industry: as a professional matador. That's what led an old friend to get Boetticher hired as a bullfighting advisor on the 1941 version of Blood and Sand. Boetticher quickly took other small jobs in Hollywood before becoming an assistant director for films like Cover Girl. In 1944, he directed his first film, the Boston Blackie entry One Mysterious Night. Boetticher made a series of other B-movies, like the underrated film noir Behind Locked Doors (1948), through the rest of the decade. Boetticher really hit his stride in the 50s when he began to get higher profile assignments, including the semi-autobiographical The Bullfighter and the Lady in 1951 which resulted in Boetticher's only Oscar nomination, for Best Writing. Sam Peckinpah later said he saw the film ten times. Other highlights of this period include Seminole (1953) (one of the first Hollywood films sympathetic to American Indians), the stylishly tight thriller The Killer Is Loose (1956) and the minor classic Horizons West (1952). In the late 50s, Boetticher also started directing TV episodes of series like Maverick and 77 Sunset Strip. In 1956, Boetticher started a string of films that really established his reputation. These six Westerns starring Randolph Scott are known as the Ranown films after the production company named after Randolph Scott and producer Harry Joe Brown. Actually the first, Seven Men from Now (1956), was produced by a different company but all of them fit together, pushing the idea of the lone cowboy seeking revenge into new territory. The sharp Decision at Sundown twists Western cliche into one of the bleakest endings to slip through the Hollywood gates. The Tall T examines the genre's violent tendencies while Ride Lonesome and Buchanan Rides Alone (1958) have titles appropriate to their Beckett-like stories. The final film, Comanche Station, appeared in 1960. That was the same year Boetticher made one of the best gangster films, The Rise and Fall of Legs Diamond, before watching everything fall apart. He and his wife decided to make a documentary about the famous matador Carlos Arruza and headed to Mexico. There Boetticher saw Arruza and much of the film crew die in an accident, almost died himself from an illness, separated from and divorced his wife (Debra Paget), and then spent time in various jails and even briefly a mental institution. This harrowing experience left him bankrupt but he still managed to complete the film, Arruza (1968), which gathered acclaim from the few who've been able to see it. Boetticher managed to make just one more film, My Kingdom For... (1985), a self-reflexive documentary about raising Andalusian horses. He also made a cameo appearance in the Mel Gibson-Kurt Russell suspense thriller, Tequila Sunrise (1988). He died from complications from surgery at the age of 85. By Lang Thompson

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States Fall September 20, 1996

Released in United States November 1996

Released in United States on Video March 18, 1997

Shown at London Film Festival (Opening Night) November 7-24, 1996.

Co-stars Goldie Hawn, Bette Midler, Diane Keaton and the entire cast of "The First Wives Club" (USA/1996) received the 1996 award for outstanding achievement in an ensemble performance from the National Board of Review.

Began shooting December 4, 1995.

Completed shooting March 19, 1996.

Parker Posey was originally cast as Phoebe.

Released in United States on Video March 18, 1997

Released in United States Fall September 20, 1996

Released in United States November 1996 (Shown at London Film Festival (Opening Night) November 7-24, 1996.)