Scott Rudin


Producer

About

Also Known As
Scott D. Rudin
Birth Place
New York City, USA
Born
July 14, 1958

Biography

A leading producer of diverse Hollywood features and Broadway productions, Scott Rudin was seen as a show business wunderkind when he was named President of Production at 20th Century Fox at the age of 27. Rudin went on to spend nearly a decade producing steady box office hits for Paramount Pictures, earning as much of a reputation for delivering high quality dramas, comedies and thrille...

Notes

In November 2001, Scott Rudin was sued by composer Stephen Sondheim and book writer John Weidman over the rights to a musical in development called "Gold!" (formerly "Wise Guys"). Ruding countersued claiming fraud and breach of contract. The matter was resolved in February 2002 and allowed the production to continue without Rudin's participation.

"Whenever Scott was insisting on something, I'd take the pillows off the couch and go under the desk and build a fort with them. The way to deal with Scott is to out juvenile him. He's a two-year-old in an old Jewish man's body." --Director Barry Sonnenfeld on how to work with Rudin, from New York Newsday, November 30, 1993.

Biography

A leading producer of diverse Hollywood features and Broadway productions, Scott Rudin was seen as a show business wunderkind when he was named President of Production at 20th Century Fox at the age of 27. Rudin went on to spend nearly a decade producing steady box office hits for Paramount Pictures, earning as much of a reputation for delivering high quality dramas, comedies and thrillers, as for his notoriously quick temper and revolving door of employees. Shortly after settling into a deal with Disney in 2004, Rudin hit a career high mark when the Coen Brothers' "No Country for Old Men" (2007) - which he had produced - and Paul Thomas Anderson's "There Will be Blood" (2007) -which he had executive produced - were both nominated for Academy Awards for Best Picture. Along with the Coen Brothers, he would win Best Picture for "No Country for Old Men."

Scott Rudin was born in New York City, NY, on July 14, 1958, and raised in the town of Baldwin on Long Island. At the age of 15, he landed a job as an assistant to the legendary theater producer Kermit Bloomgarten and went on to work for producers Robert Whitehead and Emanuel Azenberg. With one foot already firmly planted in the career of his choice, Rudin eschewed college and went right to work as a casting agent, eventually running his own firm and casting such Broadway shows as "Pippin" (1972) for Stuart Ostrow and Bob Fosse, and "Annie" (1977) for producer Mike Nichols. In addition, he cast several New York-produced films like "King of the Gypsies" (1978) and "The Wanderers" (1979).

In 1980, Rudin accepted a producing offer with Edgar J. Scherick Associates and moved to Los Angeles, CA, where he served as producer on feature dramas including "I'm Dancing as Fast as I Can" (1981) starring Jill Clayburgh; the Gloria Vanderbilt biopic miniseries "Little Gloria ... Happy at Last" (NBC, 1982), and the Oscar-winning documentary "He Makes Me Feel Like Dancin'" (1983). Following that string of successes, Rudin formed his own production company - Scott Rudin Productions - and helmed "Mrs. Soffel" (1984), Australian director Gillian Armstrong's turn-of-the century romantic drama which earned its star, Diane Keaton, a Golden Globe nomination.

Before long Rudin was wooed by 20th Century-Fox, where he briefly served as an executive producer before being promoted to President of Production in 1986. But by the following year, he resigned from the top job, reportedly to work on more independent films. Scott Rudin Productions was revived and struck a deal with Paramount, and over the next five years, Rudin was responsible for films by John Schlesinger ("Pacific Heights," 1990), Mike Nichols ("Regarding Henry" 1991), first-time director Jodie Foster ("Little Man Tate" 1991) and Barry Sonnenfeld ("The Addams Family" 1991). Rudin enjoyed a surprise comedy hit with "Sister Act" (1992) starring Whoopi Goldberg, but his other 1992 ventures - "White Sands" and "Jennifer 8" - were box office disappointments.

When Rudin's contract with Paramount expired in 1992, he did not renew; instead signing on with Tri-Star pictures, where he felt he would have more freedom to purchase and develop material. The news was seen as a boon to the studio, which was experiencing a flagging reputation and purported financial woes. Several more titles he had worked on at Paramount were released before his scheduled move to TriStar the following year, including the star-studded legal blockbuster "The Firm" (1993), and the critically acclaimed "Searching for Bobby Fischer" (1993), a sharply observed drama about a young chess prodigy.

Expanding into theatrical territory, Rudin entered into a partnership with Jujamcyn Theaters to develop and produce new work; his first effort, a co-production with Stuart Ostrow and Jujamcyn Theaters, of the unsuccessful pre-Broadway production "Face Value." The misstep was quickly forgotten the following year when Rudin won a Best Musical Tony Award for his production of Stephen Sondheim and James Lapine's "Passion." When the summer of 1994 rolled around and Rudin was scheduled to relocate to TriStar, it was announced that the producer had delayed the move for another year. Subsequently, still with Paramount, Rudin oversaw production of the romantic comedy "I.Q." (1994) and the Paul Newman vehicle "Nobody's Fool" (1994), as well as the hit "Clueless" (1995), which made a star of Alicia Silverstone and reinvigorated the teen feature market. The same year, he helmed Sydney Pollack's remake of "Sabrina" (1995) and on Broadway, scored again as a producer on Kathleen Turner's "Indiscretion" and Ralph Fiennes' New York theatre debut, "Hamlet." In 1996, Rudin was involved with producing the revival of the Sondheim-Larry Gelbart musical, "A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum," starring Nathan Lane, Ernie Sabella and Mark Linn-Baker.

Still working with Paramount, Rudin produced the Bette Midler, Goldie Hawn and Diane Keaton comedy, "The First Wives Club;" the Meryl Streep and Robert De Niro drama "Marvin's Room;" Albert Brooks' "Mother;" and the Ron Howard thriller, "Ransom" in 1996. He also diversified into television, serving as producer on the series inspired by "Clueless" (ABC, 1996-99). In 1997 Rudin - openly gay himself - scored another big comedy hit with "In & Out, starring Kevin Kline. The following year, he put together the BAFTA Best Picture nominee "The Truman Show" and "A Civil Action."

Over the next several years, Rudin's name was attached to such critically-acclaimed and diverse fare as "Sleepy Hollow" (1999), "Wonder Boys" (2000), "Zoolander" (2001), "The Royal Tenenbaums" (2001), "Iris" (2001) and "The Hours" (2002) - the latter of which received an Academy Award nomination for Best Picture. In 2004 - prompted by the resignation of Paramount chairwoman Sherry Lansing and studio president Johnathan Dolgen - Rudin decided to finally leave the studio (he had never actually hung his shingle at TriStar), opting for a first-look deal with Disney. The deal would offer him the chance to release films under any of the Mouse's four labels, including Miramax, which appealed to Rudin's taste in art films.

Following a successful run of a Rudin-produced revival of "Fiddler on the Roof," he produced his first Disney projects including "M. Night Shyalaman's The Village" (2004), quirky comedies like "I Heart Huckabees" (2004) and "The Life Aquatic with Steve Zissou" (2004), the family film "Lemony Snicket's A Series of Unfortunate Events" (2004), as well as British dramas "The Queen" (2006) and "Notes on a Scandal" (2006). Rudin hit a career high mark and fulfilled his desire to bring more art house fare into the mainstream the following year, producing two Oscar Best Picture nominees - one with the Coen Brothers' "No Country for Old Men" and the other, with Paul Thomas Anderson's "There Will Be Blood." Along with the Coen Brothers, he would take home the Best Picture Oscar for "No Country for Old Men." Rudin's career continued on that high level, continuing to work with filmmakers like the Coen Brothers and Wes Anderson on high-profile, high-prestige projects. However, Rudin's public profile took a hit in late 2014 when a computer hacking at Sony Pictures caused thousands of private emails to be published, including many exchanges with studio head Amy Pascal in which Rudin mocked and insulted a number of Hollywood stars, as well as President Barack Obama.

Filmography

 

Producer (Feature Film)

Woman in the Window (2020)
Producer
The French Dispatch (2020)
Producer
Uncut Gems (2019)
Producer
The Girl in the Spider's Web (2018)
Producer
Isle of Dogs (2018)
Producer
Norway (2018)
Producer
Game Over, Man! (2018)
Producer
The Legacy of a Whitetail Deer Hunter (2018)
Producer
Eighth Grade (2018)
Producer
Annihilation (2018)
Producer
Mid-90's (2018)
Producer
Step (2017)
Executive Producer
The Meyerowitz Stories (2017)
Producer
Lady Bird (2017)
Producer
Fences (2016)
Producer
Zoolander 2 (2016)
Producer
Steve Jobs (2015)
Producer
Mistress America (2015)
Producer
Aloha (2015)
Producer
Ex Machina (2015)
Executive Producer
While We're Young (2015)
Producer
Inherent Vice (2014)
Executive Producer
The Grand Budapest Hotel (2014)
Producer
Top Five (2014)
Producer
Rosewater (2014)
Producer
Man Under (2013)
Producer
Captain Phillips (2013)
Producer
Red Light Winter (2013)
Producer
Inside Llewyn Davis (2013)
Producer
The Dictator (2012)
Producer
Moonrise Kingdom (2012)
Producer
Frances Ha (2012)
Producer
Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close (2011)
Producer
Moneyball (2011)
Executive Producer
Margaret (2011)
Producer
The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo (2011)
Producer
True Grit (2010)
Producer
Greenberg (2010)
Producer
The Social Network (2010)
Producer
The Way Back (2010)
Executive Producer
It's Complicated (2009)
Producer
The Fantastic Mr. Fox (2009)
Producer
Julie & Julia (2009)
Executive Producer
The Other Boleyn Girl (2008)
Executive Producer
Towelhead (2008)
Executive Producer
Stop-Loss (2008)
Producer
I Could Never Be Your Woman (2008)
Producer
Doubt (2008)
Producer
Revolutionary Road (2008)
Producer
The Darjeeling Limited (2007)
Producer
There Will Be Blood (2007)
Executive Producer
Margot at the Wedding (2007)
Producer
Reprise (2007)
Executive Producer
No Country for Old Men (2007)
Producer
Venus (2006)
Executive Producer
Wild Tigers I Have Known (2006)
Executive Producer
Failure to Launch (2006)
Producer
Freedomland (2006)
Producer
Notes on a Scandal (2006)
Producer
The Queen (2006)
Executive Producer
The Life Aquatic With Steve Zissou (2004)
Producer
The Stepford Wives (2004)
Producer
The Village (2004)
Producer
Team America: World Police (2004)
Producer
Closer (2004)
Executive Producer
I Heart Huckabees (2004)
Producer
The Manchurian Candidate (2004)
Producer
Lemony Snicket's A Series of Unfortunate Events (2004)
Executive Producer
Marci X (2003)
Producer
School of Rock (2003)
Producer
The Hours (2002)
Producer
Changing Lanes (2002)
Producer
Orange County (2002)
Producer
The Royal Tenenbaums (2001)
Producer
Zoolander (2001)
Producer
Iris (2001)
Producer
Wonder Boys (2000)
Producer
Rules of Engagement (2000)
Producer
Shaft (2000)
Producer
Sleepy Hollow (1999)
Producer
South Park: Bigger, Longer & Uncut (1999)
Executive Producer
Angela's Ashes (1999)
Producer
Bringing Out the Dead (1999)
Producer
A Civil Action (1998)
Producer
The Truman Show (1998)
Producer
Twilight (1998)
Producer
In & Out (1997)
Producer
Mother (1996)
Producer
Marvin's Room (1996)
Producer
Ransom (1996)
Producer
The First Wives Club (1996)
Producer
Sabrina (1995)
Producer
Clueless (1995)
Producer
I.Q. (1994)
Executive Producer
Nobody's Fool (1994)
Producer
Searching for Bobby Fischer (1993)
Producer
Life with Mikey (1993)
Producer
The Firm (1993)
Producer
Addams Family Values (1993)
Producer
Sister Act 2: Back in the Habit (1993)
Producer
White Sands (1992)
Producer
Sister Act (1992)
Executive Producer
Jennifer Eight (1992)
Executive Producer
Little Man Tate (1991)
Producer
The Addams Family (1991)
Producer
Regarding Henry (1991)
Producer
Pacific Heights (1990)
Producer
Flatliners (1990)
Executive Producer
Mrs. Soffel (1984)
Producer
Reckless (1984)
Producer
I'm Dancing as Fast as I Can (1982)
Producer
Revenge of the Stepford Wives (1980)
Producer

Production Companies (Feature Film)

The Hours (2002)
Company

Casting (Feature Film)

Simon (1980)
Casting
Resurrection (1980)
Casting
Hide In Plain Sight (1980)
Casting
Sanctuary of Fear (1979)
Casting
Last Embrace (1979)
Casting
The Wanderers (1979)
Casting
King Of The Gypsies (1978)
Casting

Special Thanks (Feature Film)

Up Close and Personal (1996)
Special Thanks To

Misc. Crew (Feature Film)

Rules of Engagement (2000)
Other

Producer (TV Mini-Series)

Little Gloria, Happy At Last (1982)
Executive Producer

Casting (TV Mini-Series)

The Lathe of Heaven (1980)
Casting
Verna: USO Girl (1978)
Casting

Life Events

1978

First film credit as casting director, "King of the Gypsies"

1980

Moved to Los Angeles; joined Edgar J. Scherick Associates

1981

First film as producer, "I'm Dancing As Fast As I Can"

1983

Formed Scott Rudin Productions

1984

Became producer for 20th Century Fox

1986

Appointed President of Production, 20th Century Fox

1987

Resigned from Fox

1992

Signed a three-year, first-look deal with Tristar Pictures

1993

First project with Jujamcyn, David Henry Hwang's "Face Value"; production closed during previews and lost $1.2 million

1993

Joined Jujamcyn Theaters to help in the development of new theater

1993

Signed a first-look deal with Paramount

1994

Produced Stephen Sondheim-James Lapine musical "Passion"

1995

Was one of the producers of the ill-fated remake of "Sabrina"

1995

Had a critical and box-office hit with Amy Heckerling directed comedy "Clueless"

1996

Had a hit with "The First Wives' Club," which starred Bette Midler, Goldie Hawn, and Diane Keaton

1996

In partnership with Robert Fox, Roger Berlind, the Shubert Organization and others, produced the acclaimed Broadway play "Skylight," written by David Hare

1996

Was a producer of the screen version of the play "Marvin's Room," starring Keaton

1996

Served as a producer of the hit Broadway revival of "A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum"

1997

Enjoyed a box-office hit with "In & Out"

1998

Produced David Hare's "The Judas Kiss," a play about Oscar Wilde starring Liam Neeson

1998

Co-produced David Hare's "The Blue Room" which marked the Broadway debut of Nicole Kidman

1998

Served as one of the producers on the acclaimed film "The Truman Show"

1998

Co-produced the Tony-nominated production of "The Chairs"

1999

Served as a producer on "South Park: Bigger, Longer & Uncut"

1999

Was a producer of two Broadway transfers of hit London plays, "Closer" by Patrick Marber and "Amy's View" by Hare

2000

With Richard D Zanuck, co-produced "Rules of Engagement," starring Tommy Lee Jones and Samuel L Jackson

2000

Was a producer on the award-winning play "Copenhagen"; also teamed with the Shubert Organization and others to present Arthur Miller's drama "The Ride Down Mt. Morgan" on Broadway

2000

Produced John Singleton's loose remake of "Shaft," starring Jackson

2000

With the New York Shakespeare Festival and others, produced the Tony-nominated musical "The Wild Party"

2001

Produced "The Royal Tenenbaums" starring Gene Hackman and Anjelica Huston and directed by Wes Anderson

2002

Produced "The Hours" starring Nicole Kidman and Meryl Streep based on the novel by Michael Cunningham

2004

Produced "Closer," which starred Natalie Portman, Jude Law, Julia Roberts and Clive Owen and is based on the play by Patrick Marber; film was nominated for a Golden Globe for Best Picture (Drama)

2006

Produced the award winning films, "Notes on a Scandal" starring Cate Blanchett and Judi Dench, "Venus" starring Peter O'Toole and "The Queen" starring Helen Mirren

2007

Produced the Coen brothers' award winning feature "No Country for Old Men"

2010

Produced "The Social Network," a film directed by David Fincher about the founding of the social networking website Facebook

Videos

Movie Clip

Hours, The (2002) - Sort Of Like Black Fire Continuing his complex shifts of time and place, director Stephen Daldry gives us Meryl Streep as Clarissa in Manhattan buying flowers (from Eileen Atkins) for a ceremony honoring her AIDS-stricken friend and ex-lover, novelist Richard (Ed Harris), who lives in the famous Triangle Buiiding, with visits to Nicole Kidman as Virginia Woolf, and Julianne Moore as mom Laura, in 1951 LA, whose son, though we don’t know it yet, is the same Richard, in The Hours, 2002.
Hours, The (2002) - She Would Buy The Flowers Herself Having established settings in Richmond, England, 1923, Los Angeles, 1951, and New York City 2001, director Stephen Daldry working from David Hare’s script based on Michael Cunningham’s novel pivots between Nicole Kidman as Virginia Woolf with husband Stephen Dillane, Julianne Moore as housewife Laura (John C. Reilly her husband, Jack Rovello her son) and Meryl Streep as New Yorker Clarissa, Allison Janney her partner, the links not yet elaborated, in The Hours, 2002.
Hours, The (2002) - Open, The Best Thing To Do With barely-recognizable Nicole Kidman as writer Virginia Woolf, in her Academy Award-winning performance, directed by Stephen Daldry, from David Hare’s script and Michael Cunningham’s Pulitzer Prize-wining novel, the shocking and factual opening of The Hours, 2002, also starring Meryl Streep and Julianne Moore.
Mrs. Soffel (1984) - It's His Blood The famous Biddle brothers, Ed and Jack (Mel Gibson, Matthew Modine), convicted of murder in Pittsburgh, 1902, their guilt not ascertained, needling a guard (Maury Chaykin) and meeting the title character, Diane Keaton, soul-saving wife of the warden, in Gillian Armstrong's Mrs. Soffel, 1984.
Mrs. Soffel (1984) - Biddles Must Not Hang At the real Allegheny County Jail in Pittsburgh, introducing the kids (Trini Alvarado, Jennifer Dundas, Danny Corkill, Harley Cross), the Biddles (Mel Gibson, Matthew Modine), warden (Edward Hermann) and wife, risen from her sick bed, Diane Keaton, the title character, in Mrs. Soffel, 1984.

Trailer

Bibliography

Notes

In November 2001, Scott Rudin was sued by composer Stephen Sondheim and book writer John Weidman over the rights to a musical in development called "Gold!" (formerly "Wise Guys"). Ruding countersued claiming fraud and breach of contract. The matter was resolved in February 2002 and allowed the production to continue without Rudin's participation.

"Whenever Scott was insisting on something, I'd take the pillows off the couch and go under the desk and build a fort with them. The way to deal with Scott is to out juvenile him. He's a two-year-old in an old Jewish man's body." --Director Barry Sonnenfeld on how to work with Rudin, from New York Newsday, November 30, 1993.

"I'm incredibly loyal, but being nice is not my natural instinct." --Rudin quoted in New York Newsday, November 11, 1993.