Live a Little, Love a Little


1h 30m 1968
Live a Little, Love a Little

Brief Synopsis

A photographer tries to keep his conservative boss from learning that he's moonlighting for a girlie magazine.

Film Details

MPAA Rating
Genre
Comedy
Drama
Musical
Adaptation
Release Date
Jan 1968
Premiere Information
Los Angeles opening: 23 Oct 1968
Production Company
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, Inc.
Country
United States
Screenplay Information
Based on the novel Kiss My Firm but Pliant Lips by Dan Greenburg (New York, 1965).

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 30m
Sound
Mono
Color
Color (Metrocolor)
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
2.35 : 1

Synopsis

Greg, a freelance photographer, is chased from a California beach into the surf by a Great Dane. When Greg emerges from the freezing water, Bernice, the dog's owner, takes him to her house to dry out. As a result of the escapade, Greg develops a high fever and is obliged to stay on as a houseguest for 5 days. Greg finally returns to his own place, however, but learns from his landlady that Bernice has moved all of his things into her house. His life becomes even more complicated when he lands two jobs for the same hours in the same building. By carefully arranging his coffee breaks and lunch hours, he manages to circulate back and forth and please both bosses, the informal Mike Lansdown and the straitlaced Penlow. Though Bernice rents a house for Greg, she fakes a serious illness so that she may become his temporary tenant. Despite the girl's eccentric behavior, Greg eventually realizes that he has fallen in love with her. Disconcerted, now that their relationship has become serious, Bernice disappears; but her friend Harry leads Greg to find her on the beach, where the couple are reunited.

Film Details

MPAA Rating
Genre
Comedy
Drama
Musical
Adaptation
Release Date
Jan 1968
Premiere Information
Los Angeles opening: 23 Oct 1968
Production Company
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, Inc.
Country
United States
Screenplay Information
Based on the novel Kiss My Firm but Pliant Lips by Dan Greenburg (New York, 1965).

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 30m
Sound
Mono
Color
Color (Metrocolor)
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
2.35 : 1

Articles

Live a Little, Love a Little


The swinging sixties were a time of great confusion in Hollywood and a perfect example of that is Live a Little, Love a Little (1968), Elvis Presley's 28th movie. For the first time, you see a studio wrestling with the dilemma of trying to make Elvis relevant to the new, emerging pop culture. Based on the novel, Kiss My Firm But Pliant Lips by Dan Greenburg, Live a Little, Love a Little presents a hipper Elvis more in keeping with the permissive times. That means he gets to moonlight as a Playboy Magazine-type photographer while also working for a conservative advertising agency. He also gets to use some mild cuss words and break a former Elvis taboo which was never to show Elvis in bed with his leading lady. Another sign of the times are groovy visual touches here and there like a surrealistic dream sequence to the tune of "Edge of Reality," a fantasy sequence with a talking dog, and a nifty snapshot montage of Elvis in the sea.

During the filming of Live a Little, Love a Little, Elvis got the bum rush from two little old ladies on a Los Angeles street. He was literally knocked off his feet as the pair pushed past him to get autographs from their idol, Elvis's co-star Rudy Vallee. The famous crooner from the thirties is best remembered for his theme song, "My Time is Your Time" and his amusing performance in Preston Sturges' The Palm Beach Story.

Live a Little, Love a Little marked the second appearance of Vernon Presley, Elvis' father, as a background extra. His other cameo was in Loving You. Another interesting tidbit involves guitarist and composer Mac Davis. His composition, "A Little Less Conversation," was one of the standout musical numbers in the film and was used again in Elvis' 1968 TV comeback special later that year. Davis went on to write some major hits for Elvis, including "In the Ghetto" and "Don't Cry, Daddy."

Director: Norman Taurog
Cast: Elvis Presley, Michele Carey, Don Porter, Rudy Vallee, Dick Sargent, Sterling Holloway, Eddie Hodges
C-90m.Letterboxed.

by Jeff Stafford
Live A Little, Love A Little

Live a Little, Love a Little

The swinging sixties were a time of great confusion in Hollywood and a perfect example of that is Live a Little, Love a Little (1968), Elvis Presley's 28th movie. For the first time, you see a studio wrestling with the dilemma of trying to make Elvis relevant to the new, emerging pop culture. Based on the novel, Kiss My Firm But Pliant Lips by Dan Greenburg, Live a Little, Love a Little presents a hipper Elvis more in keeping with the permissive times. That means he gets to moonlight as a Playboy Magazine-type photographer while also working for a conservative advertising agency. He also gets to use some mild cuss words and break a former Elvis taboo which was never to show Elvis in bed with his leading lady. Another sign of the times are groovy visual touches here and there like a surrealistic dream sequence to the tune of "Edge of Reality," a fantasy sequence with a talking dog, and a nifty snapshot montage of Elvis in the sea. During the filming of Live a Little, Love a Little, Elvis got the bum rush from two little old ladies on a Los Angeles street. He was literally knocked off his feet as the pair pushed past him to get autographs from their idol, Elvis's co-star Rudy Vallee. The famous crooner from the thirties is best remembered for his theme song, "My Time is Your Time" and his amusing performance in Preston Sturges' The Palm Beach Story. Live a Little, Love a Little marked the second appearance of Vernon Presley, Elvis' father, as a background extra. His other cameo was in Loving You. Another interesting tidbit involves guitarist and composer Mac Davis. His composition, "A Little Less Conversation," was one of the standout musical numbers in the film and was used again in Elvis' 1968 TV comeback special later that year. Davis went on to write some major hits for Elvis, including "In the Ghetto" and "Don't Cry, Daddy." Director: Norman Taurog Cast: Elvis Presley, Michele Carey, Don Porter, Rudy Vallee, Dick Sargent, Sterling Holloway, Eddie Hodges C-90m.Letterboxed. by Jeff Stafford

Quotes

Trivia

Albert, the Great Dane in the movie was played by Elvis' own dog Brutus.

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States Fall October 1968

Released in United States on Video December 6, 1988

Released in United States Fall October 1968

Released in United States on Video December 6, 1988