Jailhouse Rock


1h 36m 1957
Jailhouse Rock

Brief Synopsis

After learning to play the guitar in prison, a young man becomes a rock 'n' roll sensation.

Photos & Videos

Jailhouse Rock - Elvis Presley Publicity Stills
Jailhouse Rock - Behind-the-Scenes Photos

Film Details

Genre
Drama
Musical
Release Date
Nov 1957
Premiere Information
New York opening: 13 Nov 1957
Production Company
Avon Productions, Inc.; Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Corp.
Distribution Company
Loew's Inc.
Country
United States

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 36m
Sound
Stereo
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
2.35 : 1
Film Length
8,677ft (5 reels)

Synopsis

Convicted of manslaughter for beating a man to death while defending a woman, hot-tempered Vince Everrett is sentenced to up to ten years in the state penitentiary. His cellmate Hunk Houghton, is a grumpy old-timer who runs a prison racket using cigarettes as currency. On days when the inmates' harsh living conditions breed animosity among the men, Hunk sings ballads on his guitar to calm them. After Vince shows interest in his musical skill, Hunk, an old country-western singer, helps the young man master the chords and rhythm. One day, the warden assigns Hunk to produce a nationally televised prison talent show to divert the attention of the state investigators visiting the prison. Hunk showcases Vince, whose performance inspires thousands of young viewers around the country to send letters to the prison. Surmising that Vince's appeal will lead to success upon his release from prison, Hunk pays off the mailroom clerks to keep the fan mail a secret and offers Vince a contract, which makes Hunk his manager and divides the profits 50/50 between them. Days later, Vince receives a flogging for getting into a brawl, but Hunk shows little sympathy and advises him to "do unto others as they would do unto you, but do it first." When Vince's release date arrives, the warden hands him fifty-four dollars and, to Vince's surprise, a large sack of fan mail. After taking a room at run-down hotel, Vince buys a guitar from a pawnshop and goes to club owner Sam Brewster, a friend of Hunk's, to ask for a job. When Sam offers him work as a busboy, Vince boldly performs a number without Sam's permission. Although the patrons show little interest, Peggy Van Alden, who works in the exploitation division of a record company, becomes smitten with Vince and suggests that he record the song at a studio session to improve it. Days later at the studio, after a mediocre recording, Peggy encourages Vince to try the song again but "with a little fire." Excited by the second recording, Peggy asks Geneva Records executive Jack Lease to release the song, and although Jack suggests the song is too experimental, he asks to keep the recording for the evening. When Peggy later secures a contract with a smaller label, a sullen Vince refuses to celebrate until he reaps some of the profit from his efforts. Wanting to introduce Vince to her father, a professor, and mother, Peggy takes Vince to her parents' house for a party, but when the academic crowd tries to engage the young musician in a conversation about progressive jazz, insecure Vince insults her parents and leaves. As Peggy argues that his conduct is unforgivable, Vince's kisses break her resolve. Days later, Peggy and Vince learn that Jack has recorded Vince's song using popular singer Mickey Alba and stolen Vince's arrangement. Undeterred, Vince suggests to Peggy that they start their own record label, Laurel Recordings, in which Vince will record his songs while Peggy promotes and distributes the product. Peggy agrees to a forty percent cut of the company's profits; however, she is soon frustrated with Vince's myopic drive for money and his lack of interest in furthering their romantic relationship. Finding it difficult to secure any airtime for Vince's first album, Peggy asks old friend and disc jockey Teddy Talbot to play a single from it. When the song is a smash hit, Vince quickly becomes a successful performer and playboy. One night, Peggy visits Vince at one of his many lavish parties and catches him kissing singer Laury Jackson. Peggy then brusquely agrees that their relationship should remain solely business and leaves. Soon after, Hunk, just released from prison, asks his old friend for a spot on an upcoming television show and Vince reluctantly consents. At the television recording, Vince sings the catchy "Jailhouse Rock" accompanied by dancers in prison fatigues, but Hunk's old-fashioned country number is cut from the show. Vince's cold response to his friend's disappointment prompts Hunk to pressure Vince with the contract written in prison. Reminding Hunk of his dishonorable scheme to hide the fan mail and then rob Vince of his profits, Vince instead offers Hunk ten percent in exchange for being his lackey. Soon after, Vince signs a contract to star in a Hollywood movie with actress Sherry Wilson. The established leading lady is not amused with Vince's common ruffian interests, but during their first love scene rehearsal, Vince's powerful kiss melts her and a romance develops. Days later at a party, after Vince sings a number about loving Sherry despite her "square" ways, then he tells Peggy about a profitable offer from Geneva Records to buy out Laurel Records. Vince's greed and disregard for the company they built together leads Peggy to flee the party. Later, Vince orders Hunk to complete another menial task, humiliating his friend. When Peggy arrives at the apartment to discuss business, Vince's thoughtlessness drives her to tears and causes a now drunk Hunk to take several punches at the star, accidentally hitting Vince's throat. After an emergency tracheotomy at the hospital, Vince is forced to recuperate in silence for several weeks, unsure of whether he will sing again. Weeks later, a healed Vince is scared of singing again, but with the support of his loyal friend Hunk and Peggy's love, he attempts an enchanting ballad for Peggy and discovers his unique voice is still intact.

Photo Collections

Jailhouse Rock - Elvis Presley Publicity Stills
Here are several Publicity Stills taken of Elvis Presley for Jailhouse Rock (1957). Publicity stills were specially-posed photos, usually taken off the set, for purposes of publicity or reference for promotional artwork.
Jailhouse Rock - Behind-the-Scenes Photos
Here are some photos taken behind-the-scenes during production of Jailhouse Rock (1957), starring Elvis Presley.

Film Details

Genre
Drama
Musical
Release Date
Nov 1957
Premiere Information
New York opening: 13 Nov 1957
Production Company
Avon Productions, Inc.; Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Corp.
Distribution Company
Loew's Inc.
Country
United States

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 36m
Sound
Stereo
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
2.35 : 1
Film Length
8,677ft (5 reels)

Articles

Jailhouse Rock


In Elvis Presley's second film, Loving You (1957), which is closer to an autobiography than any other Elvis film, the rock 'n roll king is depicted as just a humble but extremely talented musician trying to keep a clear head while experiencing overnight success. MGM scrapped this nice guy image in his third outing - Jailhouse Rock (1957) - to create a rebel persona more in line with the James Dean character in Rebel Without a Cause (1955) or Marlon Brando in The Wild One (1954). True to form, Elvis gets slapped with a manslaughter charge and sent to the state penitentiary at the beginning of the film. Although he eventually becomes a singing sensation after making an appearance at his cellmate's prison revue, his rise to fame is not a pretty picture, revealing a darker side to the public performer which is never again explored in his movies.

Of all the Elvis films, Jailhouse Rock just might be his finest song showcase, featuring first rate rock 'n roll numbers by two masters of the form, Jerry Leiber and Mike Stoller. The real showstopper is the "Jailhouse Rock" production number, which Elvis choreographed himself, but there are other gems along the way like "(You're So Square) Baby I Don't Care," performed by an outdoor swimming pool, "Treat Me Nice," and "I Want to Be Free." One of Presley's most famous ballads, "Young and Beautiful," (written by Abner Silver and Aaron Schroeder), is also featured here in three different versions, strategically placed throughout the film to show the singer's development.

Tragically, Elvis's co-star Judy Tyler would die in an automobile accident with her husband shortly before the film was released. But several of her scenes with Elvis will live on in the "Hall of Fame for Immortal Movie Quotes", particularly the one where Presley puts the moves on her. "How do you think such cheap tactics would work on me?" Tyler asks, pushing him away. "That ain't cheap tactics honey. That's just the beast in me" is the classic Elvis response.

Producer: Pandro S. Berman, Kathryn Hereford
Director: Richard Thorpe
Screenplay: Nedrick Young (story), Guy Trosper
Cinematography: Robert J. Bronner
Editing: Ralph E. Winters
Art Direction: Randall Duell, William A. Horning
Original music: Roy C. Bennett, Jerry Leiber, Aaron Schroeder, Abner Silver, Mike Stoller, Sid Tepper, Ben Weisman
Cast: Elvis Presley (Vince Everett), Judy Tyler (Peggy Van Alden), Mickey Shaughnessy (Hunk Houghton), Jennifer Holden (Sherry Wilson), Dean Jones (Teddy Talbot), Anne Neyland (Laury Jackson), Vaughn Taylor (Mr. Shores).
BW-97m. Letterboxed. Closed captioning. Descriptive Video.

by Jeff Stafford

Jailhouse Rock

Jailhouse Rock

In Elvis Presley's second film, Loving You (1957), which is closer to an autobiography than any other Elvis film, the rock 'n roll king is depicted as just a humble but extremely talented musician trying to keep a clear head while experiencing overnight success. MGM scrapped this nice guy image in his third outing - Jailhouse Rock (1957) - to create a rebel persona more in line with the James Dean character in Rebel Without a Cause (1955) or Marlon Brando in The Wild One (1954). True to form, Elvis gets slapped with a manslaughter charge and sent to the state penitentiary at the beginning of the film. Although he eventually becomes a singing sensation after making an appearance at his cellmate's prison revue, his rise to fame is not a pretty picture, revealing a darker side to the public performer which is never again explored in his movies. Of all the Elvis films, Jailhouse Rock just might be his finest song showcase, featuring first rate rock 'n roll numbers by two masters of the form, Jerry Leiber and Mike Stoller. The real showstopper is the "Jailhouse Rock" production number, which Elvis choreographed himself, but there are other gems along the way like "(You're So Square) Baby I Don't Care," performed by an outdoor swimming pool, "Treat Me Nice," and "I Want to Be Free." One of Presley's most famous ballads, "Young and Beautiful," (written by Abner Silver and Aaron Schroeder), is also featured here in three different versions, strategically placed throughout the film to show the singer's development. Tragically, Elvis's co-star Judy Tyler would die in an automobile accident with her husband shortly before the film was released. But several of her scenes with Elvis will live on in the "Hall of Fame for Immortal Movie Quotes", particularly the one where Presley puts the moves on her. "How do you think such cheap tactics would work on me?" Tyler asks, pushing him away. "That ain't cheap tactics honey. That's just the beast in me" is the classic Elvis response. Producer: Pandro S. Berman, Kathryn Hereford Director: Richard Thorpe Screenplay: Nedrick Young (story), Guy Trosper Cinematography: Robert J. Bronner Editing: Ralph E. Winters Art Direction: Randall Duell, William A. Horning Original music: Roy C. Bennett, Jerry Leiber, Aaron Schroeder, Abner Silver, Mike Stoller, Sid Tepper, Ben Weisman Cast: Elvis Presley (Vince Everett), Judy Tyler (Peggy Van Alden), Mickey Shaughnessy (Hunk Houghton), Jennifer Holden (Sherry Wilson), Dean Jones (Teddy Talbot), Anne Neyland (Laury Jackson), Vaughn Taylor (Mr. Shores). BW-97m. Letterboxed. Closed captioning. Descriptive Video. by Jeff Stafford

Quotes

I think I'm going to just hate you!
- Peggy Van Alden
No, you ain't gonna hate me. I ain't gonna let you hate me.
- Vince Everett
How dare you think such cheap tactics would work with me!
- Peggy Van Alden
That ain't tactics, honey. It's just the beast in me.
- Vince Everett

Trivia

Elvis Presley refused to watch this movie because of Judy Tyler's tragic death just before it was released.

The swank apartment for Elvis was a slightly redressed set previously used as Lauren Bacall's in Designing Woman (1957).

One day, while filming a scene, Elvis swallowed a tooth cap and had to be hospitalized to remove it.

Notes

The film's opening credits read: "Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer presents, An Avon Production, Starring Elvis Presley in Jailhouse Rock." Throughout the film Vaughn Taylor, as the lawyer "Mr. Shores" provides voice-over narration about the financial success of "Vincent Everett's" business. As noted in the October 16, 1957 Variety review, the film was producer Pandro S. Berman's first as an independent producer. His company, which went on to produce a number of films, was called Avon Productions, Inc. A biography about Presley attributes the film's initial idea to Berman's wife, the film's associate producer, Kathryn Hereford. The biography also credits the dance direction for the "Jailhouse Rock" stage sequence to Alex Romero and lists the following persons as the backup band during the first recording session scene in the film: Scotty Moore, Bill Blade, D. J. Fontana and composer Mike Stoller. Soon after completing work on Jailhouse Rock, Judy Tyler died in a car accident on July 3, 1957. The actress had only recently made her film debut in Bop Girl Goes Calypso, which was released in July 1957. Jennifer Holden also made her film debut in the film.
       Although 1950s legendary popular music entertainer Presley appeared in two film musicals previous to Jailhouse Rock, the film marked a departure in characterization for the star. Presley, as Vincent Everret, was a cunning entrepreneur whose success causes his own moral demise. According to a biography of the star, Presley disliked the film. A March 4, 1960 Hollywood Reporter news item notes that M-G-M reissued Jailhouse Rock that year to capture the wave of publicity following Presley's return from military service. The song "Jailhouse Rock" became one of the biggest hits of Presley's career. A March 23, 2001 Daily Variety article stated that screenwriters Dick Clement and Ian La Frenais were writing a stage musical adaptation of Jailhouse Rock. Producer Rene Sheridan had acquired the rights to the picture, but as of June 2005, the stage musical had not been produced. For more information about Presley please see the entry below for the 1956 film Love Me Tender.

Miscellaneous Notes

Selected in 2004 for inclusion in the Library of Congress' National Film Registry.

Released in United States Fall October 1957

Released in United States on Video November 1988

Broadcast over TNT (colorized version) August 10, 1989.

CinemaScope

Released in United States Fall October 1957

Released in United States on Video November 1988