Hook


2h 11m 1991
Hook

Brief Synopsis

A grown up Peter Pan has to fight off the return of Captain Hook.

Photos & Videos

Film Details

Also Known As
Capitaine Crochet, Hook: ou la revanche du Capitaine Crochet
MPAA Rating
Genre
Comedy
Adventure
Family
Fantasy
Adaptation
Release Date
1991
Production Company
Tove Blue Valentine
Distribution Company
TriStar Pictures
Location
Los Angeles, California, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
2h 11m

Synopsis

An update of "Peter Pan" from the original stage play and books of James M. Barrie, finds an adult Peter Pan returning to Neverland to rescue his own children from the vengeful Captain Hook.

Crew

Adelbert Acevedo

Makeup Assistant

Jonathan Ackley

Visual Effects

Gary Adelson

Coproducer

Barbara Affonso

Visual Effects

Henry Alberti

Set Designer

Jon Alexander

Conceptual Illustrator

Kenny Alexander

Stunts

Yarek Alfer

Art Department

Steven A Antoine

Lighting Technician

Leah Anton

Graphics

James M Arnett

Stunts

Seth Arnett

Stunts

Philip A Aromando

Production Assistant

Joel Aron

Visual Effects

James Ashwill

Foley Mixer

Rick Avery

Stunts

Debra Bainum

Rotoscope Animator

Gordon Baker

Visual Effects

Mark Ballentine

Lighting Technician

Perry Barndt

Stunts

Craig Barnett

Production Assistant

David Barnett

Other

William Barr

Other

James M Barrie

Book As Source Material

Daniel W. Barringer

Stunts

David M Bartholme

Stunts

Bobby D Bartlett

Grip

Kevin Bartnof

Foley Artist

Craig Baumgarten

Coproducer

Randall K Bean

Other

David Beasley

Special Effects

Kathleen Beeler

Visual Effects

Linda Benevente-notaro

Production

Tom Bertino

Rotoscope Animator

Thomas Betts

Set Designer

David Biedny

Visual Effects

Richard L Blackwell

Stunts

Kim Blank

Choreographer

Deborah 'cha' Blevins

Costumes

Nathalie B Bollinger

Stunts

Jean Bolte

Visual Effects

Sarah Bowman

Associate Producer

Joey Box

Stunts

Jon Boyden

Other

Laurie Brandt

Assistant

Steven Braund

Foreman

Nick Brett

Stunts

Eric Brevig

Visual Effects Supervisor

Charles Brewer

Stunts

Leslie Bricusse

Song

Scott Brody

Stand-In

Gregory Broussard

Extras Casting Assistant

Jeffrey S Brown

Other

Jophery Brown

Stunts

Judy Brown

Other

Raul A Bruce

Boom Operator

Clyde E Bryan

Assistant Camera Operator

Jan Bryant

Technical Advisor

Katarino Bueno Sr.

Grip

Steve Bunyea

Special Effects

James H Burk

Stunts

Bobby Burns

Stunts

Gary Burritt

Negative Cutting

Richard Burton

Other

Richard Butler

Stunts

Edwin Butterworth

Makeup Artist

Randy Cabral

Special Effects

Beth Cahn

Assistant

Anne Calanchini

Production Coordinator

Charles L Campbell

Sound Editor

Colin Campbell

Camera

Keith Campbell

Stunts

Mary Kay Campbell

Other

Cindy Canejo

Rotoscope Animator

Greg Cannom

Special Makeup Effects

Desmond Cannon

Adr

Ron Cardarelli

Key Grip

Steven Cardarelli

Grip

Paul Carden

Sound Editor

Andrew Carroll

Lighting Technician

Dave Carson

Graphics

Kim Bromley Carson

Production Coordinator

Mike Cassidy

Stunts

Nick Castle Jr.

From Story

Jaime A Caudillo

Lighting Technician

Clete Cetrone

Foreman

Donald E Chafey

Swing Gang

Steve Chambers

Stunts

Steve Chandler

Lighting Technician

Doc D Charbonneau

Stunts

Ethan Chase

Other

Tim Chau

Sound Editor

Eric Chauvin

Matte Painter

Ronald D Chong

Assistant Director

Terry Chostner

Camera

Linda Ciarimboli

Other

Glenn Close

Other

Murray Close

Photography

Caryl Codon-tharp

Hair Stylist

Alan Cody

Assistant Editor

Gary J Coelho

Foreman

Bruce Cohen

Associate Producer

Bruce Cohen

Assistant Director

Martin Cohen

Post-Production Supervisor

Susan Adele Colletta

Other

Rick Colosimo

Dolly Grip

Jim Connors

Stunts

Michael Conte

Visual Effects

Angelo Corallis

Craft Service

James F Cornick

Lighting Technician

Judith A. Cory

Hair

Alexander Courage

Original Music

James M. Cox

Other

Patrick Crane

Assistant Editor

Charlie Croughwell

Stunts

Nathan Crowley

Set Designer

Judy Crown

Hair Stylist

James P Cullen

Costumes

Michael Cummins

Visual Effects

Dean Cundey

Director Of Photography

Jeffrey Cupernell

Foley Artist

Bonnie Curtis

Assistant

David Cutler

Visual Effects

Gary Cyr

Grip

Laura Dash

Stunts

Kate Davey

Assistant Director

Bud Davis

Stunts

Larry Dean Davis

Assistant Camera Operator

Richard Dearmas

Other

Mike Deluna

Stunts

Debbie Denise

Other

Greg Dennen

Other

Justin Derosa

Stunts

Yannick Derrien

Stunts

Kim Derry

Special Effects

Gerard Dery

Other

Larry Deunger

Special Effects

Maria Devane

Assistant Production Accountant

Mitch Devane

Production

Delbert Diener

Props

Marty Dobkousky

Grip

Rob Doherty

Other

Giovanni Donovan

Visual Effects

Michael Doqui

Production

Jeff Doran

Conceptual Illustrator

Daniel T. Dorrance

Assistant Art Director

Dick Dova

Other

Dean Drabin

Adr Mixer

Lisa Drostova

Rotoscope Animator

Gregory M Dultz

Driver

Wayne L. Duncan

Grip

Chris Durmick

Stunts

Paul Ecker

Props

George Edds

Makeup Artist

Selwyn Eddy

Conceptual Illustrator

Jerry Edemann

Sound

Louis L Edemann

Sound Editor

Ernest R Eells

Lighting Technician

Leslie George Ekker

Visual Effects

Donald Elliott

Special Effects Foreman

John Ellis

Photography

Mike Ellis

Visual Effects

Garry Elmendorf

Special Effects

Ronald Elmer

Other

Gary Epper

Stunts

William Esparza

Driver

Leonardo Esqueda

Stunts

Christopher Evans

Matte Painter

Lois Evans

Extras Casting Assistant

Donna Evans Merlo

Stunts

Edward C Eyth

Visual Effects

Rachel Falk

Graphics

Michael Fallavollita

Production Assistant

Mat Falls

Production

Michelle Fandetti

Post-Production Coordinator

Dodi Fayed

Executive Producer

David Fedele

Animatronics

Bob Fernley

Conceptual Illustrator

Frank Ferrara

Stunts

Robert Finley Iii

Other

George Fisher

Stunts

Brett Fletcher

Dolly Grip

Anne C. Ford

Accountant

Sandra R Ford

Digital Effects Supervisor

Jack Forwalter

Swing Gang

Dorothy D Fox

Hair Assistant

Chris Franco

Lighting Technician

Rick Franklin

Sound Editor

Jonathan French

Graphics

Wally Frick

Driver

Tom Furginson

Swing Gang

David Gabrielli

Construction Coordinator

George Gambetta

Other

Carol Gans

Other

Alex Gaona

Stunts

Richie Gaona

Stunts

Bean Garby

Extras Casting Assistant

Hank Garfield

Sound Mixer

Scott Garrett

Swing Gang

Norman Garwood

Production Designer

Film Details

Also Known As
Capitaine Crochet, Hook: ou la revanche du Capitaine Crochet
MPAA Rating
Genre
Comedy
Adventure
Family
Fantasy
Adaptation
Release Date
1991
Production Company
Tove Blue Valentine
Distribution Company
TriStar Pictures
Location
Los Angeles, California, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
2h 11m

Award Nominations

Best Art Direction

1991
Norman Garwood

Best Costume Design

1991
Anthony Powell

Best Makeup

1991

Best Song

1991

Best Visual Effects

1991

Articles

Hook


Hook takes the Peter Pan tale in a direction few could have imagined it before Steven Spielberg's adaptation appeared in 1991. Robin Williams stars as middle-aged real-estate speculator Peter Banning, a man who can't remember his birth parents because he was placed with an adoptive family by Wendy Darling (Maggie Smith), whose granddaughter, Moira (Caroline Goodall), he later marries. On a return visit to the Darling residence in London, Banning's children are kidnapped from the nursery where Wendy claims she and her brothers conjured the stories from which J.M. Barrie created his Peter Pan tales. That's when Banning learns the stories are true and that he is Peter Pan, but grew up so that he could marry Moira. He's then carried by Tinker Bell (Julia Roberts) back to Neverland to meet Captain Hook (Dustin Hoffman), whose ransom demand is a fight to the finish. But Peter's been out of circulation for quite a while and can't even remember how to fly, let alone vanquish Hook, so the Lost Boys, (there are now a lot of them) get him back into shape and he's finally ready to save his kids and return to his former life but as a much loosier and self-confident person.

Hook was big on budget, scale and top marquee names. Even its extras were big: David Crosby, Jimmy Buffet and Glenn Close show up as pirates, Carrie Fisher and George Lucas appear in additional cameos and Phil Collins pops up as a police inspector. Due to its size and the number of cast members, costumes, etc., the production was hard to manage. It ran 40 days over its 76 day shooting schedule and was rife with personality conflicts. Julia Roberts was said to be emotionally overwrought during filming and reportedly became known as "Tinker Hell". Dustin Hoffman was a perfectionist and had his own writer on hand, and the Lost Boys, seemingly endless numbers of them, were an ever changing lineup of amateur actors.

Hook was apparently not a happy time for Spielberg, either, who commented on the experience in Steven Spielberg: A Biography by Joseph McBride, stating, "For some reason this movie was such a dinosaur coming out of the gate. It dragged me along behind it...Every day I came on the set I thought, 'Is this flying out of control?'"

The story of Peter Pan is an important one to Spielberg and film critics have spent much time charting its development through his career. Pan is a figure with whom Spielberg has readily aligned himself, as noted in a Time interview from 1985: "I have always felt like Peter Pan...It has been very hard for me to grow up...I'm a victim of the Peter Pan Syndrome."

It was the filmmaker's favorite tale as a child and when he was 11, he had his first taste of directing it, that time as a school production. In the early 80s Spielberg developed a live-action version of Peter Pan for Disney and later for Paramount and considered casting Michael Jackson in the title role. He had already discovered that Hoffman would make his ideal Hook. The project was abandoned with the birth of Spielberg's first child, Max, in 1985. In McBride's biography he recalls, "Peter Pan came at a time when I had my first child and I didn't want to go to London...I wanted to be home as a dad, not a surrogate dad."

The decision is one that the theme of Hook wholeheartedly endorses. Much has been made about Spielberg's parents' divorce, its effect on him and his own struggle to keep marriage and family intact while managing a superstar career. The collision between responsibility and eternal boyhood that has defined Spielberg's personal and creative life is key to understanding the director's attraction to Hook, so much so, that Spielberg asked John Bradshaw, the popular psychologist who sent everyone looking for his or her inner child, for advice on the script and had him on set, even casting his daughter in the film. Not surprisingly, those portions of the film that involve Peter Banning and his family are considered the most genuine and affecting aspects of Hook.

Apparently Michael Jackson, also notably obsessed with Peter Pan, was disappointed that he wasn't able to play the role on screen and not just on his Neverland Ranch. Vanity Fair reported in a 2000 article that he tried to put a lethal voodoo curse on Spielberg as a result of not winning the lead role.

Largely considered one of Spielberg's least successful films, Hook nonetheless did well at the box office. Made for a budget of $70 million, it grossed $119 million on U.S. screens. It was nominated for five Oscars®, including those for Art Direction, Costumes, Visual Effects, Makeup and Music. For fans of John Williams, the score for Hook is considered one of his best.

Producer: Frank Marshall, Kathleen Kennedy and Gerald R. Molen
Director: Steven Spielberg
Screenplay: Jim V. Hart and Malia Scotch Marmo, J.M. Barrie (books and play), Jim V. Hart and Nick Castle (screen story)
Cinematography: Dean Cundey
Art Direction: Andrew Precht and Thomas E. Sanders
Music: John Williams
Film Editing: Michael Kahn
Cast: Dustin Hoffman (Captain Hook), Robin Williams (Peter Banning), Julia Roberts (Tinkerbell), Bob Hoskins (Smee), Maggie Smith (Granny Wendy), Caroline Goodall (Moira Banning), Charlie Korsmo (Jack 'Jackie' Banning), Amber Scott (Maggie Banning).
C-142m. Letterboxed. Closed Captioning.

by Emily Soares
Hook

Hook

Hook takes the Peter Pan tale in a direction few could have imagined it before Steven Spielberg's adaptation appeared in 1991. Robin Williams stars as middle-aged real-estate speculator Peter Banning, a man who can't remember his birth parents because he was placed with an adoptive family by Wendy Darling (Maggie Smith), whose granddaughter, Moira (Caroline Goodall), he later marries. On a return visit to the Darling residence in London, Banning's children are kidnapped from the nursery where Wendy claims she and her brothers conjured the stories from which J.M. Barrie created his Peter Pan tales. That's when Banning learns the stories are true and that he is Peter Pan, but grew up so that he could marry Moira. He's then carried by Tinker Bell (Julia Roberts) back to Neverland to meet Captain Hook (Dustin Hoffman), whose ransom demand is a fight to the finish. But Peter's been out of circulation for quite a while and can't even remember how to fly, let alone vanquish Hook, so the Lost Boys, (there are now a lot of them) get him back into shape and he's finally ready to save his kids and return to his former life but as a much loosier and self-confident person. Hook was big on budget, scale and top marquee names. Even its extras were big: David Crosby, Jimmy Buffet and Glenn Close show up as pirates, Carrie Fisher and George Lucas appear in additional cameos and Phil Collins pops up as a police inspector. Due to its size and the number of cast members, costumes, etc., the production was hard to manage. It ran 40 days over its 76 day shooting schedule and was rife with personality conflicts. Julia Roberts was said to be emotionally overwrought during filming and reportedly became known as "Tinker Hell". Dustin Hoffman was a perfectionist and had his own writer on hand, and the Lost Boys, seemingly endless numbers of them, were an ever changing lineup of amateur actors. Hook was apparently not a happy time for Spielberg, either, who commented on the experience in Steven Spielberg: A Biography by Joseph McBride, stating, "For some reason this movie was such a dinosaur coming out of the gate. It dragged me along behind it...Every day I came on the set I thought, 'Is this flying out of control?'" The story of Peter Pan is an important one to Spielberg and film critics have spent much time charting its development through his career. Pan is a figure with whom Spielberg has readily aligned himself, as noted in a Time interview from 1985: "I have always felt like Peter Pan...It has been very hard for me to grow up...I'm a victim of the Peter Pan Syndrome." It was the filmmaker's favorite tale as a child and when he was 11, he had his first taste of directing it, that time as a school production. In the early 80s Spielberg developed a live-action version of Peter Pan for Disney and later for Paramount and considered casting Michael Jackson in the title role. He had already discovered that Hoffman would make his ideal Hook. The project was abandoned with the birth of Spielberg's first child, Max, in 1985. In McBride's biography he recalls, "Peter Pan came at a time when I had my first child and I didn't want to go to London...I wanted to be home as a dad, not a surrogate dad." The decision is one that the theme of Hook wholeheartedly endorses. Much has been made about Spielberg's parents' divorce, its effect on him and his own struggle to keep marriage and family intact while managing a superstar career. The collision between responsibility and eternal boyhood that has defined Spielberg's personal and creative life is key to understanding the director's attraction to Hook, so much so, that Spielberg asked John Bradshaw, the popular psychologist who sent everyone looking for his or her inner child, for advice on the script and had him on set, even casting his daughter in the film. Not surprisingly, those portions of the film that involve Peter Banning and his family are considered the most genuine and affecting aspects of Hook. Apparently Michael Jackson, also notably obsessed with Peter Pan, was disappointed that he wasn't able to play the role on screen and not just on his Neverland Ranch. Vanity Fair reported in a 2000 article that he tried to put a lethal voodoo curse on Spielberg as a result of not winning the lead role. Largely considered one of Spielberg's least successful films, Hook nonetheless did well at the box office. Made for a budget of $70 million, it grossed $119 million on U.S. screens. It was nominated for five Oscars®, including those for Art Direction, Costumes, Visual Effects, Makeup and Music. For fans of John Williams, the score for Hook is considered one of his best. Producer: Frank Marshall, Kathleen Kennedy and Gerald R. Molen Director: Steven Spielberg Screenplay: Jim V. Hart and Malia Scotch Marmo, J.M. Barrie (books and play), Jim V. Hart and Nick Castle (screen story) Cinematography: Dean Cundey Art Direction: Andrew Precht and Thomas E. Sanders Music: John Williams Film Editing: Michael Kahn Cast: Dustin Hoffman (Captain Hook), Robin Williams (Peter Banning), Julia Roberts (Tinkerbell), Bob Hoskins (Smee), Maggie Smith (Granny Wendy), Caroline Goodall (Moira Banning), Charlie Korsmo (Jack 'Jackie' Banning), Amber Scott (Maggie Banning). C-142m. Letterboxed. Closed Captioning. by Emily Soares

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States Winter December 11, 1991

Released in United States on Video July 24, 1992

Released in United States December 8, 1991

Released in United States April 7, 1992

Shown at premiere to benefit the Peter Pan Children's Fund and the Great Ormond Street Children's Hospital December 8, 1991 in Los Angeles.

Shown at royal premiere in London to benefit the Great Ormond Street Children's Hospital April 7, 1992.

In a deal brokered by Creative Artists Agency (CAA), Steven Spielberg, Dustin Hoffman, Robin Williams and Julia Roberts split 40% of TriStar's first $50,000,000 in worldwide revenues (not boxoffice grosses). After the studio's first $50,000,000 in revenues, the deal calls for TriStar to keep all the proceeds up to $120,000,000. Thereafter, the director and stars will receive at least 40% of each additional dollar in studio revenues.

Gwyneth Paltrow, who portrays Young Wendy, is the daughter of actress Blythe Danner and television producer-director Bruce Paltrow.

Began shooting February 21, 1991.

Completed shooting August 8, 1991.

The Great Ormond Street Hospital, a London hospital for seriously ill children, will receive a percentage of royalties from the film, including money from premieres and box office grosses. James M. Barrie donated all future rights to his 1904 play to the hospital in 1929.

Released in United States Winter December 11, 1991

Released in United States on Video July 24, 1992

Released in United States December 8, 1991 (Shown at premiere to benefit the Peter Pan Children's Fund and the Great Ormond Street Children's Hospital December 8, 1991 in Los Angeles.)

Released in United States April 7, 1992 (Shown at royal premiere in London to benefit the Great Ormond Street Children's Hospital April 7, 1992.)