Christopher Challis


Director Of Photography

About

Birth Place
London, England, GB
Born
March 18, 1919
Died
May 31, 2012

Biography

Outstanding color cinematographer who established himself after World War II with a series of Michael Powell/Emeric Pressburger films, notably the black-and-white, "Small Back Room" (1948) and the lushly colorful "The Red Shoes" (1948) and "Tales of Hoffman" (1951), and the dazzling "Arabesque" (1966)....

Biography

Outstanding color cinematographer who established himself after World War II with a series of Michael Powell/Emeric Pressburger films, notably the black-and-white, "Small Back Room" (1948) and the lushly colorful "The Red Shoes" (1948) and "Tales of Hoffman" (1951), and the dazzling "Arabesque" (1966).

Filmography

 

Cast (Feature Film)

Cameraman: The Life and Work of Jack Cardiff (Do Not Use) (2011)
Himself

Cinematography (Feature Film)

Steaming (1985)
Director Of Photography
The Riddle of the Sands (1984)
Director Of Photography
Top Secret! (1984)
Director Of Photography
Secrets (1982)
Director Of Photography
Evil Under The Sun (1982)
Director Of Photography
The Mirror Crack'd (1980)
Director Of Photography
Why Not Stay For Breakfast? (1979)
Cinematographer
S.O.S. Titanic (1979)
Director Of Photography
Force Ten From Navarone (1978)
Director Of Photography
The Deep (1977)
Director Of Photography
White Rock (1977)
Cinematographer
The Incredible Sarah (1976)
Director Of Photography
Mr. Quilp (1975)
Director Of Photography
The Little Prince (1974)
Director Of Photography
The Public Eye (1972)
Director of Photography
Villain (1971)
Director of Photography
Mary, Queen of Scots (1971)
Director of Photography
Catch Me a Spy (1971)
Director Of Photography
The Private Life of Sherlock Holmes (1970)
Director of Photography
Staircase (1969)
Director of Photography
A Dandy in Aspic (1968)
Director of Photography
Chitty Chitty Bang Bang (1968)
Director of Photography
Two for the Road (1967)
Director of Photography
Kaleidoscope (1966)
Director of Photography
Arabesque (1966)
Director of Photography
Those Magnificent Men in Their Flying Machines; or How I Flew From London to Paris in 25 Hours and 11 Minutes (1965)
Director of Photography
An Evening With The Royal Ballet (1965)
Photographer for "Les Sylphides"
Return From the Ashes (1965)
Director of Photography
The Long Ships (1964)
Director of Photography
The Americanization of Emily (1964)
Addl Photographer
A Shot in the Dark (1964)
Director of Photography
The Victors (1963)
Director of Photography
Damn the Defiant! (1962)
Director of Photography
Flame in the Streets (1962)
Director of Photography
Never Let Go (1962)
Director of Photography
The Grass Is Greener (1961)
Director of Photography
Five Golden Hours (1961)
Director of Photography
Surprise Package (1960)
Director of Photography
Sink the Bismarck! (1960)
Director of Photography
Chance Meeting (1959)
Director Of Photography
Floods of Fear (1958)
Director Of Photography
Night Ambush (1958)
Director Of Photography
WINDOM'S WAY (1958)
Director Of Photography
Rooney (1958)
Cinematographer
Miracle In Soho (1957)
Cinematographer
Pursuit of the Graf Spee (1957)
Director Of Photography
The Spanish Gardener (1956)
Director Of Photography
Footsteps in the Fog (1955)
Director of Photography
Quentin Durward (1955)
Director of Photography
Raising a Riot (1955)
Director Of Photography
Oh... Rosalinda! (1955)
Director Of Photography
The Fighting Pimpernel (1954)
Photography
Flame and the Flesh (1954)
Director of Photography
Fire over Africa (1954)
Director of Photography
Saadia (1954)
Director of Photography
Genevieve (1954)
Director Of Photography
Affair in Monte Carlo (1953)
Director of Photography
The Story of Gilbert and Sullivan (1953)
Cinematographer
The Tales of Hoffmann (1951)
Cinematographer
Gone to Earth (1950)
Cinematographer
Hour of Glory (1949)
Cinematographer
Hour of Glory (1949)
Cinematographer
The Red Shoes (1948)
Camera Operator

Misc. Crew (Feature Film)

Cameraman: The Life and Work of Jack Cardiff (Do Not Use) (2011)
Other
Force Ten From Navarone (1978)
Dp/Cinematographer
The Deep (1977)
Dp/Cinematographer

Cinematography (Short)

The Sorcerer's Apprentice (1955)
Director Of Photography

Life Events

1938

First feature as camera assistant, "Drums"

1946

Worked as 2nd unit cinematographer on "A Matter of Life and Death", first of six films made with Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger

1947

First feature as director of photography, "The End of the River"

Videos

Movie Clip

Chitty Chitty Bang Bang (1968) - Definitely Unstable Just rescued after a near-accident by friendly motorist “Truly Scrumptious” (Sally Ann Howes), Jemima and Jeremy (Heather Ripley, Adrian Hill), who never go to school, indirectly introduce their crackpot inventor father Potts (Dick Van Dyke), and later his father (Lionel Jeffries, headed to “Inja!”), early in Chitty Chitty Bang Bang, 1968, from an Ian Fleming novel, and 007 producer Albert R. Broccoli.
Chitty Chitty Bang Bang (1968) - She's Not Just Any Old Car After an elaborate opening confirming the (title) car’s lineage, we meet Jemima and Jeremy (Heather Ripley, Adrian Hill) at play, Victor Maddern making an offer to Coggins (Desmond Llewelyn, James Bond’s “Q”) then meeting Sally Ann Howes (as Truly Scrumptious), in the family musical and technical marvel from Bond producer Albert R. Broccoli, Chitty Chitty Bang Bang, 1968, starring Dick Van Dyke.
Chitty Chitty Bang Bang (1968) - Baron Bomburst, Title Song Inventor dad Potts (Dick Van Dyke) with sweetheart Truly (Scrumptious! Sally Ann Potts) on a beach picnic has just confabulated the evil Baron Bomburst (Gert Fröbe, a.k.a. Goldfinger) for the kids (Heather Ripley, Adrian Hill), cueing another Richard M. and Robert B. Sherman original and one of the first big tech sequences, in Chitty Chitty Bang Bang, 1968, from James Bond producer Albert R. Broccoli.
Chitty Chitty Bang Bang (1968) - Toot Sweets Joining nutty inventor Potts (Dick Van Dyke) making a pitch to candy kingpin Lord Scrumptious (James Robertson Justice), cajoled by daughter Truly (Sally Ann Howes) and his own kids (Heather Ripley, Adrian Hill), the first big production number, and another Richard M. and Robert B. Sherman original, in Chitty Chitty Bang Bang, 1968.
Shot In The Dark, A (1964) - Back On The Case Snoozing Inspector Clouseau (Peter Sellers) inevitably leads to his first clash with his man Kato (Burt Kwouk), and a call from the boss (Herbert Lom), in Blake Edwards' first Pink Panther sequel, A Shot In The Dark, 1964.
Shot In The Dark, A (1964) - This Pen Has Been Fired Recently First appearance of Peter Sellers as Inspector Clouseau, in the first sequel to The Pink Panther, 1964, Graham Stark his aide, meeting Lafarge (Douglas Wilmer), big-shot Ballon (George Sanders), Maurice (Martin Benson) and Elke Sommer as Maria at the murder site, in Blake Edwards’ A Shot In The Dark, 1964.
Long Ships, The (1964) - I'm No Dreamer The nervous Viking adventurer Rolfe (Richard Widmark), captured by Moorish Sheikh El Mansuh (Sidney Poitier) improvises an escape in The Long Ships, 1964.
Two For The Road (1967) - How Can You Be So Callous? Joanna (Audrey Hepburn) has narrated a leap back to the European trip when she and Mark (Albert Finney) first met, her traveling with a singing troupe fronted by dazzling Jackie (Jacqueline Bisset), him a footloose young architect, in Stanley Donen’s Two For The Road, 1967.
Two For The Road (1967) - Quite Happy In The MG Having leapt back in time maybe seven years, to an earlier trip from England to France, in the old MG they remember, Mark amd Joanna (Albert Finney, Audrey Hepburn) relatively friendly, except for a jump back to the current trip in the Mercedes, in Stanley Donen’s Two For The Road, 1967.
Shot In The Dark, A (1964) - A Rit Of Fealous Jage! Just the ending of the famous encounter at the billiard table between Inspector Clouseau (Peter Sellers) and his gracious if droll prime suspect Ballon (George Sanders), early in Blake Edwards' A Shot In The Dark, 1964.
Shot In The Dark, A (1964) - A Passionate Spaniard Inspector Clouseau (Peter Sellers) is eager to interrogate maid Maria (Elke Sommer) about the murder of her chauffeur boyfriend, early in Blake Edwards' A Shot In The Dark, 1964.
Two For The Road (1967) - They Don't Look Very Happy Opening from producer-director Stanley Donen, from Frederic Raphael’s original screenplay, less-than blissful couple Audrey Hepburn and Albert Finney as Joanna and Mark, starting out in the Mercedes (Donen’s own car), in the bittersweet rom-com Two For The Road, 1967.

Trailer

Bibliography