Quentin Durward


1h 43m 1955
Quentin Durward

Brief Synopsis

A gallant Scots knight falls in love with his uncle's future wife.

Film Details

Also Known As
Sir Walter Scott's Quentin Durward
Genre
Adventure
Historical
Adaptation
Release Date
Oct 21, 1955
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Corp.
Distribution Company
Loew's Inc.
Country
Great Britain and United States
Location
France; United Kingdom; Elstree, England, Great Britain; Loire Valley, France; France
Screenplay Information
Based on the novel Quentin Durward by Sir Walter Scott (Edinburgh, 1823).

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 43m
Sound
4-Track Stereo
Color
Color (Eastmancolor)
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
2.55 : 1
Film Length
9,059ft (11 reels)

Synopsis

In 1465 Scotland, honorable knight Quentin Durward meets with his elderly uncle, the distinguished but impoverished Lord Crawford, who seeks to marry the young and wealthy Isabelle, Countess of Marcroy in France. Crawford requests that his nephew carry his proposal to France and also determine that Isabelle is worthy of the union. In France, at the Peronne chateau of Charles, Duke of Burgundy, the duke is angered when his ward Isabelle refuses to receive Lord Malcolm, the Scottish ambassador. Outraged that the duke has already approved of her marriage in order to secure the alliance with Crawford as well as to gain access to her great fortune and vast property, Isabelle rejects the proposed wedding. That evening, Quentin attends a banquet given by Charles in honor of Malcolm, but the festivities are interrupted by the news that Isabelle has run away. Learning that Isabelle's coach and guards have fled, Quentin follows. Later, Isabelle's coach makes a brief stop at an inn where a local man overhears mention of Isabelle's large jewelry box and reports the information to Count William de la Marck, a renegade aristocrat-turned-criminal, who rules the forest with a thousand men. Arriving at the inn after Isabelle's departure, Quentin discovers the countess is in danger and, outflanking the count's forces, reaches Isabelle's escort in time to warn them. With the assistance of Isabelle's guards, Quentin sets up an ambush for de la Marck and his men, allowing Isabelle to escape safely. After losing his horse in the attack, Quentin returns on foot to Malcolm, who suspects that Isabelle has sought refuge at the court of King Louis XI. Malcolm reveals if this is true, Charles will believe Isabelle has betrayed him and declare war on Louis to regain control of her lands. Malcolm beseeches Quentin to go to the French court for the good of Scotland's ally, Burgundy, warning him not to count on the principles of knightly honor, which have given way to violence and duplicity. Upon arriving at the chateau of King Louis in Plessis les Tours, Quentin is rebuffed by the palace guards when he requests an audience with the king. Later in the nearby forest, Quentin frees a gypsy who has been hung, but the man is then shot by several armed men. When the men's leader offers Quentin money to join them, Quentin berates him for his attempted bribery only to be shocked to learn the man is King Louis. Declaring that he cannot trust a man he cannot buy, Louis orders Quentin to depart France. That evening as Quentin lurks outside the king's castle, he is befriended by a gypsy, Hayraddin, the brother of the man killed in the forest. Hayraddin admits that he is a spy and acknowledges that Isabelle has indeed come to the castle, but is now being held under guard by Louis. Fearful that Quentin's virtuous behavior will place him in danger, Hayraddin urges Quentin to break into the castle while he distracts the guards. Once in the castle, Quentin sneaks into Louis' private chamber and demands that the king allow him to serve France. Impressed with Quentin's bravery and daring, Louis welcomes him and orders him to guard Isabelle. Unknown to Quentin, Louis then meets Charles's representative, Count Phillip de Creville, who demands that Isabelle be released. When Louis denies Isabelle's presence, de Creville declares Charles's intention to go to war unless the countess is returned. Louis offers Charles thirty days to reconsider and vows to come to Burgundy personally at the end of that time to negotiate with Charles. Privately, Louis assures his shocked advisors that he has no intention of going to Burgundy and intends to use de la Marck against Charles. Meanwhile, Isabelle takes a liking to Quentin who laments that the virtues of honor and decency have fallen out of fashion. Later in private, Louis tells Isabelle that her presence in the castle is too much of a danger and he can no longer protect her. Isabelle agrees to depart, declaring she will return to Burgundy to seek sanctuary with the Bishop of Liege. Louis promises her an escort through the dangerous Ardennes forest, but then secretly arranges with his confidant, Master Oliver, to have Hayraddin pay de la Marck to kidnap Isabelle to bring her back to his court. Louis then orders Quentin to lead Isabelle's escort guard to Liege. On the evening of the first day of travel, Isabelle grows suspicious of Quentin when he refuses to explain his relationship with Lord Crawford or his presence in France. The next day, Isabelle's coach loses a wheel and during the repair, she attempts to escape. Quentin catches her and confesses that despite having fallen in love with her, he is obliged to deliver her to Liege. Later, Hayraddin joins Isabelle's party as the guide promised by Louis. Realizing that Quentin is incapable of suspecting the king of duplicity, Hayraddin reveals the impending assault by de la Marck. When the count's men attack, Isabelle escapes her kidnappers and distracts the soldiers by throwing them her jewelry box. Quentin is wounded while escaping with Isabelle, and Hayraddin takes them to hide in a gypsy camp. Leaving the next morning so as not to endanger the gypsies, the group continues in disguise to Liege where the bishop welcomes Isabelle. Quentin recovers over the next few weeks, then admits his relationship with Crawford and Charles to Isabelle, who fears that Quentin's integrity will prevent any chance for their personal happiness. When the thirty-day period reaches an end, Charles is amazed that Louis comes to Burgundy as promised. On that same day, Hayraddin spots de la Marck's men at a Liege inn and on his way to advise Quentin, is shot and killed. In front of Charles and his court, Louis insists that he did not go against Burgundy by sheltering Isabelle. Meanwhile, de la Marck leads an attack on Liege and finding Isabelle, demands that the bishop marry them in order to disrupt Louis' plans and gain access to Isabelle's fortune and land for himself. Spotting the burning church walls, set on fire during the initial assault, Quentin arrives and rescues Isabelle before meeting de la Marck in a duel in a burning bell tower where the count is killed. Quentin returns to Perrone to discover from Malcolm that Crawford has unexpectedly died and that Charles has arrested Louis on the belief that he ordered the murder of the bishop. Quentin attends Louis' trial and presents de la Marck's severed head, swearing the count murdered the bishop and that he killed the count at Louis' behest to defend Isabelle, a citizen of Burgundy. Freed by the court, Louis then challenges Charles to work with him to create a united France. When the men then bicker about which of their lieutenants should marry Isabelle, Louis abruptly makes the radical suggestion that the countess be allowed to select her own husband. Isabelle joyfully chooses Quentin and the two are wed.

Film Details

Also Known As
Sir Walter Scott's Quentin Durward
Genre
Adventure
Historical
Adaptation
Release Date
Oct 21, 1955
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Corp.
Distribution Company
Loew's Inc.
Country
Great Britain and United States
Location
France; United Kingdom; Elstree, England, Great Britain; Loire Valley, France; France
Screenplay Information
Based on the novel Quentin Durward by Sir Walter Scott (Edinburgh, 1823).

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 43m
Sound
4-Track Stereo
Color
Color (Eastmancolor)
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
2.55 : 1
Film Length
9,059ft (11 reels)

Articles

Quentin Durward


Quentin Durward (1955) took actor Robert Taylor to MGM's British studios for the fifth time. For over 30 years he remained one of MGM's leading principal players, starring opposite some of the screen's most glamorous leading ladies. Quentin Durward brought Taylor's London score to four hits out of five and gave him an exceptionally striking heroine in Kay Kendall.

Filmed on location in English and French countryside castles, the story is set in 15th-century France. Quentin Durward (Robert Taylor) is a poor but noble Scot in the service of his uncle who plans to wed Isabelle, Countess of Marcroy (Kay Kendall). When Durward is sent to France to inspect his uncle's prospective bride, the Countess slips away from her protector, the Duke of Burgundy (Alec Clunes), who has arranged the match. Finding brief refuge with King Louis XI (Robert Morley), Isabelle is forced to flee again when she learns the crafty Louis is plotting against her with a renegade count. Naturally, the dashing Durward foils the plot and falls in love as a consequence. But can a romance fit into the politics of imperialism?

The supporting cast is wonderful with Robert Morley a standout in his role. The film also highlights the beauty of Kay Kendall, who was to die much too young (three years after the film was made). Robert Taylor made eight films with director Richard Thorpe, four prior to Quentin Durward including; The Crowd Roars (1938), Ivanhoe (1952), All the Brothers Were Valiant (1953) and Knights of the Round Table (1953). Thorpe, by now an old hand at costume films, directs for maximum action and throws in a dash of humor.

Director: Richard Thorpe
Producer: Pandro S. Berman
Screenplay: Robert Ardrey, George Froeschel (based on the novel by Sir Walter Scott)
Cinematography: Christopher Challis
Editor: Ernest Walter
Music: Bronislau Kaper
Art Design: Alfred Junge
Costume Design: Elizabeth Haffenden
Cast: Robert Taylor (Quentin Durward), Kay Kendall (Isabelle, Countess of Marcroy), Robert Morley (King Louis XI), George Cole (Hayraddin), Alec Clunes (Charles, Duke of Burgundy), Duncan Lamont (Count William de la Marck)
C-101m. Letterboxed. Closed captioning.

by Celia Reilly
Quentin Durward

Quentin Durward

Quentin Durward (1955) took actor Robert Taylor to MGM's British studios for the fifth time. For over 30 years he remained one of MGM's leading principal players, starring opposite some of the screen's most glamorous leading ladies. Quentin Durward brought Taylor's London score to four hits out of five and gave him an exceptionally striking heroine in Kay Kendall. Filmed on location in English and French countryside castles, the story is set in 15th-century France. Quentin Durward (Robert Taylor) is a poor but noble Scot in the service of his uncle who plans to wed Isabelle, Countess of Marcroy (Kay Kendall). When Durward is sent to France to inspect his uncle's prospective bride, the Countess slips away from her protector, the Duke of Burgundy (Alec Clunes), who has arranged the match. Finding brief refuge with King Louis XI (Robert Morley), Isabelle is forced to flee again when she learns the crafty Louis is plotting against her with a renegade count. Naturally, the dashing Durward foils the plot and falls in love as a consequence. But can a romance fit into the politics of imperialism? The supporting cast is wonderful with Robert Morley a standout in his role. The film also highlights the beauty of Kay Kendall, who was to die much too young (three years after the film was made). Robert Taylor made eight films with director Richard Thorpe, four prior to Quentin Durward including; The Crowd Roars (1938), Ivanhoe (1952), All the Brothers Were Valiant (1953) and Knights of the Round Table (1953). Thorpe, by now an old hand at costume films, directs for maximum action and throws in a dash of humor. Director: Richard Thorpe Producer: Pandro S. Berman Screenplay: Robert Ardrey, George Froeschel (based on the novel by Sir Walter Scott) Cinematography: Christopher Challis Editor: Ernest Walter Music: Bronislau Kaper Art Design: Alfred Junge Costume Design: Elizabeth Haffenden Cast: Robert Taylor (Quentin Durward), Kay Kendall (Isabelle, Countess of Marcroy), Robert Morley (King Louis XI), George Cole (Hayraddin), Alec Clunes (Charles, Duke of Burgundy), Duncan Lamont (Count William de la Marck) C-101m. Letterboxed. Closed captioning. by Celia Reilly

Quotes

Tell me, gypsy. Do you know this castle?
- Quentin Durward
Of course. Like the palm of your hand.
- Hayraddin

Trivia

Notes

The opening title card reads: "Sir Walter Scott's Quentin Durward." The following written acknowledgment appears in the onscreen credits: "Producers gratefully acknowledge permissions accorded them to photograph: Bodiam Castle, England, Chateau de Chambord, France, Chateau de Chenonceaux, France, Chateau de Maintenon, France." Publicity also lists Chateau Fontainebleau as a location site. As dramatized in the film, Louis XI, King of France (1461-1483) made two unsuccessful attempts to overthrow his father before finally ascending to the throne at Charles VII's death. As king, Louis broke the power of the nobility led by Charles "the Bold" of Burgundy. By 1483 Louis had united most of France (with the exception of Brittany) under one crown and laid the foundations for absolute monarchy in France.
       According to a Hollywood Reporter news item, Grace Kelly was considered for the role of "Isabelle," but declined after recently having starred in M-G-M's 1954 costume drama Green Fire. Charles Goldner was originally cast as "Hayraddin," but upon his death in April 1955, British comedian George Cole was assigned the part. Hollywood Reporter casting lists add Norman Wooland, Georgette Anys, Gloria Lasso, Yvette Clermont, Gitana Lazora and Michael Brooke to the cast, but their appearance in the finished film has not been confirmed. In 1988 a Russian adaptation of the Scott novel was produced, and in 1971 a short-lived television series based on the Scott novel was broadcast in France.

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States Fall October 1955

CinemaScope

Released in United States Fall October 1955